Current Biomaterials News and Events | Page 2

Current Biomaterials News and Events, Biomaterials News Articles.
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New heart valve could transform open heart surgery for millions of patients globally
A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. The team's latest in-vitro results, published in Biomaterials Science, suggest that the PoliValve could last for up to 25 years. (2020-06-29)

Direct reprogramming: Defying the contemporary limitations in cardiac regeneration
Repair and regeneration of myocardium are the best possible therapy for the end-stage heart failure patients because the current therapies that can help restore the lost cardiomyocytes are limited to heart transplantation only. Emerging interests to directly reprogram a mammalian heart with minimal regenerative capacity holds a promising future in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. (2020-06-22)

Researchers study a novel type of extracellular vesicles
Researchers from Sechenov University and the University of Pittsburgh compared the properties of two groups of extracellular vesicles. Either present in a liquid phase or attached to the fibres of the extracellular matrix, these vesicles facilitate metabolism and cell-cell communication. A better understanding of their structure, production and movement can help create new bioengineered materials and repair damaged tissues more quickly. Findings are published in Science Advances. (2020-06-18)

3D X-ray reveals secrets from inside bones
An international team of researchers from Aarhus University, the European Synchotron (ESRF), Chalmers University and the Paul Scherrer Institute have uncovered a previously unknown substructure in bone tissue using a new X-ray technique to produce 3D images of the internal structure of bones. The discovery potentially questions fundamentally a number of the models of bone tissue and the mechanical properties of bones that, among other things, is used to describe the process of bone formation. (2020-06-15)

Increased usability and precision in vascular imaging
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments. (2020-05-26)

New therapy for triple negative breast cancer
Researchers at the Principe Felipe Research Center (CIPF), the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), CIBER-BBN and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) of Barcelona have inhibited tumor growth and reduced metastasis, as well as the toxicity of the antitumor drug Navitoclax in preclinical animal models of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). (2020-05-25)

Combinatorial screening approach opens path to better-quality joint cartilage
High-throughput platform identifies complex conditions with biomaterial compositions, and mechanical and chemical stimuli that help stem cells produce more robust cartilage. (2020-05-22)

Texas A&M lab engineers 3D-functional bone tissues
Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar, associate professor, has developed a highly printable bioink as a platform to generate anatomical-scale functional tissues. (2020-05-19)

New bone-graft biomaterial gives patients a nicer smile and less pain
A new recipe for a bone-graft biomaterial that is supercooled before application should make it easier to meet dental patients' expectation of a good-looking smile while eliminating the pain associated with harvesting bone from elsewhere in their body. (2020-05-15)

Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
EPFL scientists have developed a new computational approach to create artificial proteins, which showed promising results in vivo as functional vaccines. This approach opens the possibility to engineer safer and more effective vaccines. (2020-05-14)

Biomaterial immune control discoveries could reduce implant rejection
Scientists have discovered how the materials used in medical implants like artificial joints can be adapted to control the immune response to them and reduce the risk of rejection. (2020-05-04)

UCLA scientists invent nanoparticle that could improve treatment for bone defects
In a test on mice, UCLA researchers showed that their sterosome, when implanted in a bone defect, activated bone regeneration without needing additional drugs. In the second phase of their study, they saw an average reduction of roughly 50% in the size of the defects after they implanted a drug-loaded sterosome on a 3D scaffold. (2020-04-22)

Insect wings hold antimicrobial clues for improved medical implants
Some insect wings such as cicada and dragonfly possess nanopillar structures that kill bacteria upon contact. However, to date, the precise mechanisms that cause bacterial death have been unknown. Using a range of advanced imaging tools, functional assays and proteomic analyses, a study by the University of Bristol has identified new ways in which nanopillars can damage bacteria. (2020-04-06)

New 3D cultured cells mimic the progress of NASH
A research team led by scientists from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has successfully established 3D cultured tissue that mimics liver fibrosis, a key characteristic of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). For making the 3D culture, cells were collected from liver tissues of NASH model mice. Their findings open up a new avenue for developing drugs for NASH patients, identifying new markers for early diagnosis, and better understanding the disease progression. (2020-04-01)

Adjusting processing temperature results in better hydrogels for biomedical applications
Biohydrogels have been studied closely for their potential use in biomedical applications, but they often move between sols and gels, depending on their temperature, changes that can pose issues depending on the intended use. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their work studying the effect of temperature on hydrogels. They found that creating hydrogels at room temperature or below results in more robust materials that function more effectively when used in the body. (2020-03-24)

A genetic nano-toolkit for the generation of new biomaterials
Magnetic bacteria might soon be used for the production of novel biomaterials. A team of microbiologists at the University of Bayreuth led by Prof. Dr. Dirk Schüler developed a modular system for the genetic reprogramming of bacteria, thereby turning the organisms into cell factories for multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles that combine various useful functions and properties. (2020-03-24)

Superior 'bio-ink' for 3D printing pioneered
Rutgers biomedical engineers have developed a 'bio-ink' for 3D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body. The study was published in the journal Biointerphases. (2020-02-10)

Mapping the future direction for bioprinting research
The way research in bioprinting will be taken forward has been laid out in a roadmap for the field. Published today in IOP Publishing's Biofabrication, leading researchers define the status, challenges and opportunities in the field, and forecast the required advances in science & technology to overcome the challenges to a range of bioprinting techniques and applications. (2020-02-07)

Scientists create 'Chemical gardens' that can be used as bone substitute materials
A new way of making bone-replacement materials that allows for cells to grow around and inside them has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-02-06)

Programmed vascular endothelium remodeling using a remote-controlled 'smart' platform
Vascular regeneration is of high significance in cardiovascular disease treatment, while it remains challenging due to the difficulty of endothelialization. The endothelialization of native blood vessels involves of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mediated stepwise modulation of different vascular endothelial cell functions at different stages. Recently, scientists in China develop a remote-controlled ''smart'' platform capable of directing different vascular endothelial cell functions in temporally controllable manners, successfully replicating the dynamic ECM-mediated effects and thereby significantly promoting vascular regeneration. (2020-02-05)

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy. (2020-02-04)

Grooves hold promise for sophisticated healing
Rice University bioengineers print 3D implants with layered cells destined to become distinct combinations of tissue, like bone and cartilage. The scaffolds degrade over time to leave the natural tissues in place. (2020-02-04)

Predicting the degradation behavior of advanced medical devices
Polymer materials play a vital role in today's medicine. While many applications demand for long-lasting devices, others benefit from materials that disintegrate once their job is done. The design of such materials largely depends on the capability to predict their degradation behavior. A team of researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht led by Prof. Andreas Lendlein established a method to faster and more reliably predict the degradation of these polymer materials with sophisticated molecular architectures. (2020-01-23)

Using a chip to find better cancer fighting drugs
Kyoto researchers have developed a new 'tumor-on-a-chip' device that can better mimic the environment inside the body, paving the way for improved screening of potential cancer fighting drugs. The device, has a 1 mm well at the center flanked by a series of 100 μm 'microposts'. The culture is placed in the middle well, and cells that construct blood vessels are places along the microposts. Over a few days the vessels grow and attaches to the culture. (2019-12-20)

Artificial 'inclusion bodies' created for controlled drug release
A new study by the UAB, the CIBER-BBN, and the Hospital de Sant Pau describes the development of a new biomaterial with sustained drug release. The results were recently published in Advanced Science and describe the creation of artificial inclusion bodies for uses in precision biotechnology and nanomedicine. The structures contain functional proteins released similarly to how human hormones are released by the endocrine system. (2019-12-19)

Scientists find way to supercharge protein production
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found a way to increase production of proteins in bacteria up to a thousandfold, a discovery that could aid production of proteins used in the medical, food, agriculture, chemical and other industries. (2019-12-18)

Bone bandage soaks up pro-healing biochemical to accelerate repair
Researchers at Duke University have engineered a patch or bandage that captures a pro-healing molecule called adenosine that briefly surges at the site of a bone break or fracture to accelerate and improve the natural healing process. In a proof-of-principle study with mice, the bandage helped to accelerate callus formation and vascularization to achieve better bone repair by three weeks. (2019-12-13)

New remote-controlled 'smart' platform helps in cardiovascular disease treatment
A joint research group led by Dr. DU Xuemin at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently demonstrated a remote-controlled 'smart' platform that effectively directs programmed vascular endothelium remodeling in a temporally controllable manner. (2019-12-03)

Researchers create 'smart' surfaces to help blood-vessel grafts knit better, more safely
Researchers at McMaster University have created a new coating to prevent clotting and infection in synthetic vascular grafts, while also accelerating the body's own process for integrating the grafted vessels. (2019-11-27)

Protection for pacemakers
A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers developed at ETH Zurich has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. The next step is to test the protective membrane in patients. (2019-11-21)

New antitumoral drug release strategy created for breast cancer treatment
Researchers from the CIBER-BBN and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona use bioengineering to design non-toxic drug-release granules to be administered locally and with prolonged therapeutic effects. (2019-11-21)

Chemists create new route to PHAs: naturally degradable bioplastics
Eugene Chen, professor in the Colorado State University Department of Chemistry, has led a new study demonstrating a chemical catalysis path for making an existing class of biomaterials called PHAs -- already gaining momentum in industrial settings -- even more commercially viable and structurally diverse. (2019-11-21)

Gene therapy: Development of new DNA transporters
Scientists at the Institute of Pharmacy at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed new delivery vehicles for future gene therapies. A team of researchers led by Dr Christian Wölk are using artificial fats to transport DNA into cells. The scientists demonstrate how well this technique works in a study conducted in collaboration with pharmacists from the University of Marburg. The study has been published in 'Biomaterials Science'. (2019-11-18)

New 3D printing technique produces 'living' 4D materials
UNSW Sydney researchers have successfully merged 3D/4D printing with a chemical process to produce 'living' resin, which has huge potential for fields as diverse as recycling and biomedicine. (2019-11-18)

Study reveals breach of 'dancing' barrier governs crystal growth
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago used computer-based simulations to analyze how atoms and molecules move in a solution and identified a general mechanism governing crystal growth that scientists can manipulate when developing new materials. (2019-11-12)

Study results may provide a better understanding of Alzheimer's disease
Research suggests that the complex meshwork of proteins and potentially other biomolecules that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells in the brain may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease. (2019-10-31)

Researchers explore spinal discs' early response to injury and ways to improve it
Researchers showed in animal models that the default injury response of spinal discs can be temporarily stopped to allow for better treatment. (2019-10-14)

New 3D printing technique for biomaterials
A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. (2019-10-04)

Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury
A team of NJIT biomedical engineers are developing a therapy which shows early indications it can protect neurons and stimulate the regrowth of blood vessels in damaged tissue. (2019-10-03)

Using unconventional materials, like ice and eggshells, as scaffolds to grow tissues
In a review publishing Sept. 18, 2019 in the journal Trends in Biotechnology, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell explore recent efforts to use everyday materials like ice, paper, and spinach as tissue scaffolds. These unconventional materials, they argue, are more functional, more sustainable, and less expensive, as well as being available around the globe and applicable to many areas of biomedical research. (2019-09-18)

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