Current Biomedical Engineering News and Events | Page 2

Current Biomedical Engineering News and Events, Biomedical Engineering News Articles.
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Innovation spins spider web architecture into 3D imaging technology
Purdue University innovators are taking cues from nature to develop 3D photodetectors for biomedical imaging. The Purdue researchers used some architectural features from spider webs to develop the technology. (2020-10-21)

Removal of synthetic estrogen from water
Synthetic estrogens from pharmaceuticals contaminate rivers and threaten the health of humans and fish. An effective and cost-efficient method for removing synthetic estrogen from bodies of water (2020-10-20)

University of Sydney research could lead to customised cochlear implants
A School of Biomedical Engineering researcher has analysed the accuracy of predictions for cochlear implant outcomes, with a view to further improve their performance in noisy environments. (2020-10-19)

Gel instrumental in 3D bioprinting biological tissues
The eventual creation of replacement biological parts requires fully three-dimensional capabilities that two-dimensional and three-dimensional thin-film bioprinting cannot supply. Now, using a yield stress gel, Penn State engineers can place tiny aggregates of cells exactly where they want to build the complex shapes that will be necessary to replace bone, cartilage and other tissues. (2020-10-16)

Golden meat: Engineering cow cells to produce beta carotene
Scientists exploit carotenoid pathway used in golden rice to grow nutritionally enhanced, cell-cultured meat. (2020-10-15)

Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)

All-terrain microrobot flips through a live colon
A rectangular robot as tiny as a few human hairs can travel throughout a colon by doing back flips, Purdue University engineers have demonstrated in live animal models. (2020-10-15)

New test can target and capture most lethal cells in fatal brain cancer
A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults. (2020-10-15)

Researchers use lab-grown tissue grafts for personalized joint replacement
A multidisciplinary team from Columbia Engineering, Columbia's College of Dental Medicine and Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University, LaCell LLC, and Obatala Sciences has now bioengineered living cartilage-bone temporomandibular joint grafts, precisely matched to the recipient, both biologically and anatomically. Their new study, published today in Science Translational Medicine, builds upon a long series of their previous work on bioengineering functional cartilage and bone for regenerative medicine and tissue models of disease. (2020-10-14)

Turning excess noise into signal
Excess noise fluctuations of light are widely considered to be detrimental in optics and photonics. Here, scientists from the United States report that incoherent excess noise spectrally encodes broadband light, providing a unique tool to characterize spectrometers. With this tool, they improve spectrometer performance in visible light Optical Coherence Tomography. The resulting retinal images reveal a new and subtle photoreceptor band. This work motivates the search for other useful applications of excess noise. (2020-10-14)

Layer of strength, layer of functionality for biomedical fibers
Wound dressing, tissue scaffolding, controlled and sustained drug delivery, and cardiac patching are all biomedical processes requiring a material that combines strength with functionality. Core-sheath polymer fibers, fibers comprised of a strong core surrounded by a biologically applicable sheath layer, are an affordable way to meet these requirements. In the journal Applied Physics Reviews, researchers discuss methods of producing core-sheath polymer fibers and their promising applications. (2020-10-13)

New method uses noise to make spectrometers more accurate
Optical spectrometers are instruments with a wide variety of uses. By measuring the intensity of light across different wavelengths, they can be used to image tissues or measure the chemical composition of everything from a distant galaxy to a leaf. Now researchers at the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering have come up a with a new, rapid method for characterizing and calibrating spectrometers, based on how they respond to ''noise.'' (2020-10-13)

Scientists develop new precise therapeutic leukemia vaccine
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University have developed a new type of precise therapeutic vaccine against leukemia. It utilizes self-healing polylactic acid microcapsules for co-encapsulating a new epitope peptide and PD-1 antibody. (2020-10-12)

New therapy improves treatment for multiple sclerosis
A new therapy that binds a cytokine to a blood protein shows potential in treating multiple sclerosis, and may even prevent it. (2020-10-12)

Researchers 3D print unique micro-scale fluid channels used for medical testing
In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications. (2020-10-09)

UCI biochip innovation combines AI and nanoparticle printing for cancer cell analysis
In a new paper in Advanced Biosystems, researchers at the University of California, Irvine describe how they combined artificial intelligence, microfluidics and nanoparticle inkjet printing in a device that enables the examination and differentiation of cancers and healthy tissues at the single-cell level. (2020-10-07)

Enhancing blood sugar control boosts brain health for people with type 2 diabetes
Controlling blood sugar levels improved the ability to clearly think, learn and remember among people with type 2 diabetes who were overweight, a new study shows. But losing weight, especially for people who were obese, and increasing physical activity produced mixed results. (2020-10-02)

Biomedical sciences researchers find new way to prevent and cure rotavirus, other viral infections
A combination of two substances secreted by the immune system can cure and prevent rotavirus infection, as well as potentially treat other viral infections that target epithelial cells, which cover body surfaces such as skin, blood vessels, organs and the urinary tract, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-10-02)

General data protection regulation hinders global biomedical research
The European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was designed to give EU citizens greater protection and control of their personal data, particularly when transferred to entities outside the EU. (2020-10-01)

Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue. (2020-09-30)

Researchers create artificial lung to support pre-term babies in distress
An international team led by current and former McMaster University researchers has developed an artificial lung to support pre-term and other newborn babies in respiratory distress. (2020-09-29)

Exosome treatment improves recovery from heart attacks in a preclinical study
Research in pigs shows that using the exosomes naturally produced from a mixture of heart muscle cells, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells -- which were all derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells -- yields regenerative benefits equivalent to the injected human induced pluripotent stem cell-cardiac cells. (2020-09-29)

New discovery helps researchers rethink organoid cultures
Organoids are stem cell-based tissue surrogates that can mimic the structure and function of organs, and they have become a key component of numerous types of medical research in recent years. But researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have uncovered problems with the conventional method for growing organoids for common experiments that may cause misleading results. (2020-09-29)

An app monitors cancer patients' health status and rewards participation
Gamification is becoming increasingly common in educational settings, but can also be used in other fields such as health. Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Zaragoza have developed the Close2U application, which enables healthcare staff to monitor cancer patients' mood and physical discomfort using daily questionnaires. In return for the information they provide, users receive motivational resources such as advice or songs that they can exchange with other patients, fostering interaction. (2020-09-25)

A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech
Self-erasing chips developed at the University of Michigan could help stop counterfeit electronics or provide alerts if sensitive shipments are tampered with. (2020-09-24)

Alcohol, nicotine mix during pregnancy increases health risk in newborns
In the first study of its kind, University of Houston researchers are reporting that during early pregnancy, the mix of alcohol and nicotine significantly alters the gene regulatory pathways of the developing fetus, which can lead to major deficiencies in brain development. (2020-09-23)

Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages. (2020-09-21)

Artificial intelligence detects osteoarthritis years before it develops
Researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm that can pick up on subtle signs of osteoarthritis - too abstract to register in the eye of a trained radiologist - on an MRI scan taken years before symptom onset. (2020-09-21)

Researchers create better material for wearable biosensors
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have used electrospinning to make porous silicone that allows sweat to evaporate. (2020-09-16)

Researchers use soy to improve bone cancer treatment
Researchers showed that the slow release of soy-based chemical compounds from a 3D-printed bone-like scaffold resulted in a reduction in bone cancer cells while building up healthy cells and reducing harmful inflammation. (2020-09-15)

Dipanjan Pan demonstrates new method to produce gold nanoparticles in cancer cells
Researchers published a seminal study in Nature Communications that demonstrates for the first time a method of biosynthesizing plasmonic gold nanoparticles within cancer cells, without the need for conventional bench-top lab methods. It has the potential to notably expand biomedical applications. (2020-09-11)

Oxygen-releasing bioink for 3D bioprinting
Newly developed bioink enhances the ability of implanted cells to grow and regenerate new tissue (2020-09-09)

New surgical tools with smart sensors can advance cardiac surgery and therapy
Researchers developed a new class of medical instruments equipped with an advanced soft electronics system that could dramatically improve the diagnoses and treatments of a number of cardiac diseases and conditions. (2020-09-07)

Research brief: Researchers 3D print lifelike heart valve models
Researchers from the University of Minnesota, with support from Medtronic, have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient. (2020-08-28)

Lipid-Oligonucleotides (LONs) --- Promising materials for bioapplications
Lipid-oligonucleotides (LONs) are promising biological materials with special amphiphilic structures and unique functionalities of two moieties, contributing to different bioapplications (from biosensors to biomedicines). LONs have been employed in cellular microenvironment monitoring and mechanical forces measurements, and have shown potential in developing targeted theranostics as well as controllable nanoreactors. This review will discuss the recent progress of using LONs in various bioapplications and the remaining challenges, while leaving some suggestions for future improvement. (2020-08-20)

Dinosaurs' unique bone structure key to carrying weight
A unique collaboration between paleontologists, mechanical engineers and biomedical engineers revealed that the trabecular bone structure of hadrosaurs and several other dinosaurs is uniquely capable of supporting large weights, and different than that of mammals and birds. (2020-08-20)

Microscopy approach poised to offer new insights into liver disease
Researchers have developed a new way to visualize the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in mouse models of the disease. (2020-08-19)

Researchers one step closer to bomb-sniffing cyborg locusts
Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has determined that locusts can smell explosives and determine where the smells originated -- an important step in engineering cyborg bomb-sniffing locusts. (2020-08-14)

Improving treatment of spinal cord injuries
A group led by UC Riverside bioengineering professor Victor G. J. Rodgers and UC Riverside School of Medicine professor Devin Binder has created an osmotic therapy device that gently removes fluid from the spinal cord to reduce swelling in injured rats with good results. The device can eventually be scaled up for testing in humans. (2020-08-12)

Brain-NET, a deep learning methodology, accurately predicts surgeon certification scores based on neuroimaging data
In a new article in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, researchers demonstrated how a deep learning framework they call ''Brain-NET'' can accurately predict a person's level of expertise in terms of their surgical motor skills, based solely on neuroimaging data. (2020-08-11)

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