Current Biomedical Research News and Events

Current Biomedical Research News and Events, Biomedical Research News Articles.
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Extreme blood sugar swings in people with type 2 diabetes may increase heart disease risk
In patients with type 2 diabetes, big swings in blood sugar levels between doctors' visits are associated with an increased risk of heart disease. (2021-02-03)

Improved macaque genome enhances biomedical utility
Using advanced sequencing technology, researchers present a new, improved and far more complete reference genome for the rhesus macaque - one of the most important animal models in biomedical research. (2020-12-17)

Magnetic spray: Giving inanimate objects new bionergy
Recently, researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with the City University of Hong Kong (CityU), have developed an agglutinate, reprogrammable, disintegrable and biocompatible magnetic spray (M-spray) that can easily turn inanimate objects into millirobots. (2020-11-18)

Enhancing blood sugar control boosts brain health for people with type 2 diabetes
Controlling blood sugar levels improved the ability to clearly think, learn and remember among people with type 2 diabetes who were overweight, a new study shows. But losing weight, especially for people who were obese, and increasing physical activity produced mixed results. (2020-10-02)

Biomedical sciences researchers find new way to prevent and cure rotavirus, other viral infections
A combination of two substances secreted by the immune system can cure and prevent rotavirus infection, as well as potentially treat other viral infections that target epithelial cells, which cover body surfaces such as skin, blood vessels, organs and the urinary tract, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-10-02)

General data protection regulation hinders global biomedical research
The European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was designed to give EU citizens greater protection and control of their personal data, particularly when transferred to entities outside the EU. (2020-10-01)

Dipanjan Pan demonstrates new method to produce gold nanoparticles in cancer cells
Researchers published a seminal study in Nature Communications that demonstrates for the first time a method of biosynthesizing plasmonic gold nanoparticles within cancer cells, without the need for conventional bench-top lab methods. It has the potential to notably expand biomedical applications. (2020-09-11)

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)

Flu vaccine may reduce risk of Alzheimer's disease, new study shows
People who received at least one flu vaccination were 17% less likely to get Alzheimer's disease over the course of a lifetime, according to researchers at UTHealth. (2020-07-27)

Why is obesity so common in COVID-19 patients?
A hormone that connects the body's metabolism and immune response system may explain why COVID-19 is so dangerous for people with obesity. (2020-07-24)

The new tattoo: Drawing electronics on skin
One day, people could monitor their own health conditions by simply picking up a pencil and drawing a bioelectronic device on their skin. In a new study, University of Missouri engineers demonstrated that the simple combination of pencils and paper could be used to create devices that might be used to monitor personal health. (2020-07-13)

Study discovers BAM15 as a potential treatment for obesity
A new study offers the first evidence that a protein named BAM15 acts as an energy uncoupler and could be an effective drug for treating obesity and related diseases. (2020-06-10)

Pilot program aims to improve reproducibility, utility, and ethics of biomedical research
Addressing the widespread concern over transparency and reproducibility in biomedical research, one of the largest institutions in German science has begun to provide a framework, interventions, and incentives for improving the quality and value of translational research. The program is described by its leader, Ulrich Dirnagl of Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), and colleagues in a new article publishing on Feb. 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. (2020-02-11)

FASEB Journal: Anesthetic drug sevoflurane improves sepsis outcomes, animal study reveals
Patients with sepsis often require surgery or imaging procedures under general anesthesia, yet there is no standard regimen for anesthetizing septic patients. Of volatile (inhaled) anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane are the most commonly used drugs, despite their undetermined mechanisms of action. A novel study in The FASEB Journal suggests that the type of drug used in general anesthesia could be critical to the survival of patients with sepsis. (2019-09-12)

Gut microbiota linked to organ damage in patients with sepsis
Sepsis is a serious condition that can result in organ failure and even death. A novel human study published in The FASEB Journal demonstrates for the first time that the gut microbiota of patients with sepsis plays a major role in organ damage. (2019-08-29)

Researchers design superhydrophobic 'nanoflower' for biomedical applications
Plant leaves have a natural superpower -- they're designed with water repelling characteristics. Called a superhydrophobic surface, this trait allows leaves to cleanse themselves from dust particles. Inspired by such natural designs, a team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to control the hydrophobicity of a surface to benefit to the biomedical field. (2019-07-02)

Researchers find fecal marker could help diagnose early signs of chronic gut conditions
Small molecules found in fecal matter could provide clues to the early inflammation found in chronic gut conditions, such as intestinal bowel disease (IBD), and serve as new biomarkers for diagnosis, according to a study led by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-06-27)

Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement
Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study published in The Biological Bulletin. In 'Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the Behavior of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus in Its Natural Habitat,' Meghan Owings and her colleagues report the results of an investigation of the behavioral and physiological effects that the bleeding process has on horseshoe crabs that are released back into their natural environment. (2019-06-20)

The FASEB Journal: New psoriatric arthritis mouse model developed
Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that can reduce mobility and agility in patients. PsA is known to increase the risk of type II diabetes. A recent study published in The FASEB Journal tested a novel mouse model that may one day lead to therapeutic approaches or reagents for human skin pathology, as well as joint erosion and disc degeneration, that would improve quality of life for patients with PsA. (2019-06-06)

The FASEB Journal: New strategy to reduce cancer drug's cardiotoxic effects
Doxorubicin (Doxo) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug for cancer, though it can have toxic effects on the heart. A recent animal study published in The FASEB Journal investigated whether the cardioregulatory protein chromogranin A (CgA) contributes to the regulation of the cardiotoxic and antitumor activities of Doxo. (2019-04-11)

New data suggests nicotine while pregnant alters genes
A University of Houston biomedical research team is reporting that a possible cure for addiction may be found by following the pathways of significantly altered dopamine neurons in newborns who were chronically exposed to nicotine in utero. (2019-02-05)

New review of scientific studies confirms food cravings can be reduced
Food craving, the intense desire to eat certain foods, can sabotage efforts to maintain healthy eating habits and body weight, no matter the time of year. However, an examination of 28 current peer-reviewed scientific studies largely substantiates findings that changes in diet, prescription medications, physical activity and bariatric surgery reduce craving, said Candice Myers, PhD, assistant professor - research at LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center. (2018-12-11)

Texas A&M team develops new way to grow blood vessels
Formation of new blood vessels, a process also known as angiogenesis, is one of the major clinical challenges in wound healing and tissue implants. To address this issue, researchers from Texas A&M University have developed a clay-based platform to deliver therapeutic proteins to the body to assist with the formation of blood vessels. (2018-08-17)

New study provides next clue to prevent dangerous episodes of low blood sugar in diabetics
A new LSU Pennington Biomedical Research Center study reveals that a novel biomarker might give us new answers necessary to creating a diagnostic tool for hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF). No objective diagnostic tool currently exists for this condition which, if left untreated, can lead to ever-worsening and possibly life-threatening episodes of dangerously low blood sugar. (2018-08-10)

Rutgers researchers develop automated robotic device for faster blood testing
Rutgers researchers have created an automated blood drawing and testing device that provides rapid results, potentially improving the workflow in hospitals and other health-related institutions to allow health care practitioners to spend more time treating patients. A study describing the fully automated device is published online in the journal TECHNOLOGY. (2018-06-13)

Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty
Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty. (2018-01-17)

Faster, more accurate cancer detection using nanoparticles, Rutgers-led study finds
Using light-emitting nanoparticles, Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have invented a highly effective method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread, potentially leading to earlier cancer detection and more precise treatment. (2017-12-12)

Nebraska discovery offers clues to why Zika became more dangerous
Virus with a certain sugar in its protein envelope more readily passes to the brain in infected mice, causing inflammation and death. (2017-10-04)

Shedding light deeper into the human brain
The inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. The reality is that light scattering is the major obstacle for deep penetration into tissue. (2017-07-26)

Spanish researchers review the state-of-the-art text mining technologies for chemistry
In a recent Chemical Reviews article, the Biological Text Mining Unit at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) together with with researchers at the Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), of the University of Navarra, in Pamplona, and the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre (BSC-CNS) have published the first exhaustive revision of the state-of-the-art methodologies underlying chemical search engines, named entity recognition and text mining systems. (2017-06-21)

Team science critical to diagnosis, prevention, treatment of diseases
Tackling complex biomedical research increasingly requires the development of new approaches to facilitate innovative, creative and impactful discoveries. A group of scientists from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) show that a team science approach is critical to solving complex biomedical problems and advancing discoveries in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human disease. (2017-04-27)

Public funding essential for advances in biomedical research
Article shows that publicly-funded research creates knowledge that links to private companies' efforts to develop drugs, medical devices, and other patented biomedical products. (2017-03-30)

Accounting for sex differences in biomedical research
When it comes to health, a person's sex can play a role. More women in the US have autoimmune diseases than men, for example, whereas boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than girls. Yet biomedical research on disease and possible new treatments often studies only one sex. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores efforts to change this practice. (2017-03-22)

Professor, researcher in brain machine interfaces to speak at Louisiana Tech
Louisiana Tech University's Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS) and its Consortium on Neuronal Networks in Epilepsy and Memory (NeuroNEM) will host a presentation by Dr. Jose C. Principe, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, as part of the Seminar Series on Probing and Understanding the Brain. (2017-03-13)

Paper pumps power portable microfluidics, biomedical devices
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools. (2017-03-08)

$1.1 million grant funds study on why early pregnancy prevents breast cancer
Biomedical scientist Rajkumar Lakshmanaswamy, Ph.D., has received a $1.1 million research grant from the US Department of Defense (DOD) to study how early pregnancy reduces a woman's risk for breast cancer. (2017-03-06)

Biomedical Engineering hosts national conference on STEM education for underserved students
The University of Akron hosts a national conference aimed at ensuring underserved students have access to opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Taking place March 8-10, 2017, the conference is expected to draw 200 K-12 teachers and academics from across the nation. Through workshops and speakers, attendees explore why participation lags among underrepresented racial, ethnic and socioeconomic students. The LeBron James Family Foundation, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Facing History will be presenters. (2017-03-03)

UVA School of Medicine sees huge increase in federal research funding
Federal funding for UVA's medical research surged from $101.2 million in 2015 to more than $126 million in 2016, according to new figures. (2017-01-26)

New study finds postdocs don't yield positive labor market returns
A new study by Boston University and University of Kansas researchers has found that postdoc jobs don't yield a positive return in the labor market, and that these positions likely cost graduates roughly three years worth of salary in their first 15 years of their careers. (2017-01-10)

FASEB announces new database of research organism providers
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) launched a new tool to help biomedical and life science investigators identify US suppliers of research organisms ranging from algae to mice, fruit flies, and maize. The Database of US Providers of Research Organisms aids researchers searching for stock centers, living collections, and commercial providers, all of which play an essential role in providing scientists access to quality research organisms. (2016-12-20)

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