Current Biomineralization News and Events

Current Biomineralization News and Events, Biomineralization News Articles.
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Life of a pure Martian design
Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient crustal materials from Mars, led by ERC grantee Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna, now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material. (2021-02-19)

Quantum leaps in understanding how living corals survive
A new imaging technique has been developed to improve our ability to visualize and track the symbiotic interactions between coral and algae in response to globally warming sea surface temperatures and deepening seawaters. (2021-02-15)

Can we make bones heal faster?
A new paper in Science Advances describes for the first time how minerals come together at the molecular level to form bones and other hard tissues, like teeth and enamel. (2020-12-03)

Metal pollution in British waters may be threatening scallops, study reveals
Research, led by an interdisciplinary team at the University of York, suggests that the contamination of Isle of Man seabed sediments with zinc, lead and copper from the mining of these metals, which peaked on the island in the late 19th century, is causing the shells of king scallops to become significantly more brittle (2020-11-05)

Experts elucidate latest knowledge on phosphate metabolism and related disorders
Special issue of Calcified Tissue International features expert reviews that give state-of-the-art insights into the underlying mechanisms of phosphate metabolism and discuss advances in knowledge and management of hypo- and hyperphosphatemia, as well as oncogenic osteomalacia. (2020-08-17)

Biosignatures may reveal a wealth of new data locked inside old fossils
Step aside, skeletons -- a new world of biochemical ''signatures'' found in all kinds of ancient fossils is revealing itself to paleontologists, providing a new avenue for insights into major evolutionary questions. (2020-07-12)

HKUST researchers unlock genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail
Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have decoded for the first time the genome of Scaly-foot Snail, a rare snail inhabited in what scientists called 'the origin of life'- deep-sea hydrothermal vents characterized with impossible living condition. Unraveling the genome of this unique creature will not only shed light on how life evolved billions of years ago, but will also lay foundation for the discovery of potential remedies offered by these ancient creatures. (2020-04-28)

Understanding mechanics and materials though evolution and biomaterials
Studying the evolution of bodily processes millions of years ago as well as the properties of today's biomaterials could improve soft robotics design and inform materials science research. At the 2020 American Physical Society March Meeting in Denver, scientists will present research on mineralized skeletons, other biomaterials, and the mathematics of aging. (2020-03-02)

Montana State researcher harnesses microorganisms to make living building materials
Chelsea Heveran, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, is the lead author of a new study showing that certain bacteria can be used to create an easily recyclable, concrete-like substance. (2020-01-22)

Bacteria and sand engineered into living concrete
Cement and concrete haven't changed much as technology in over a hundred years, but researchers in Colorado are revolutionizing building materials by literally bringing them to life. The method developed, presented Jan. 15 in the journal Matter, combines sand and bacteria to build a living material that has structural load-bearing and biological function. (2020-01-15)

Study reveals breach of 'dancing' barrier governs crystal growth
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago used computer-based simulations to analyze how atoms and molecules move in a solution and identified a general mechanism governing crystal growth that scientists can manipulate when developing new materials. (2019-11-12)

Promising new solar-powered path to hydrogen fuel production
Engineers at Lehigh University are the first to utilize a single enzyme biomineralization process to create a catalyst that uses the energy of captured sunlight to split water molecules to produce hydrogen. The synthesis process is performed at room temperature and under ambient pressure, overcoming the sustainability and scalability challenges of previously reported methods. (2019-08-01)

Microaerobic Fe(II) oxidation could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil
Carbon assimilation process is important to maintain the production and ecological function of paddy field. The recent publication from Professor Fangbai LI's group has found that microaerobic Fe(II) oxidation could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil that was developed from iron-rich red soil, which provides an insight into the ecological function of iron cycling in the critical zone of red soil. (2019-05-27)

Using bacteria to protect roads from deicer deterioration
Special bacteria that help form limestone and marble could soon have a new job on a road crew. Recent research from Drexel University's College of Engineering shows how the bacteria, called Sporosarcina pasteurii, can be used to prevent the road degradation caused by ice-melting salt. (2019-04-09)

Nanomaterials give plants 'super' abilities (video)
Science-fiction writers have long envisioned human-machine hybrids that wield extraordinary powers. However, 'super plants' with integrated nanomaterials may be much closer to reality. Today, scientists report the development of plants that can make nanomaterials called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and the application of MOFs as coatings on plants. The augmented plants could potentially perform useful new functions. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-04-03)

Magnetic teeth hold promise for materials and energy
For the first time, a team led by Okayama University and the University of California, Riverside has discovered a piece of the genetic puzzle that allows the chiton to produce magnetite nanomaterials. (2019-02-01)

Chirality switching in biomineral structures
Researchers at McGill University have discovered a mechanism by which helical biomineral structures can be synthesized to spiral clockwise or counterclockwise using only either the left-handed or right-handed version of a single acidic amino acid. (2018-08-01)

Researchers build artificial cellular compartments as molecular workshops
How to install new capabilities in cells without interfering with their metabolic processes? A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have altered mammalian cells in such a way that they formed artificial compartments in which sequestered reactions could take place, allowing the detection of cells deep in the tissue and also their manipulation with magnetic fields. (2018-05-22)

New cellular insights in bone development
Most of us don't think about our teeth and bones until one aches or breaks. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis looked deep within collagen fibers to see how the body forms new bone and teeth, seeking insights into faster bone healing and new biomaterials. (2018-04-06)

Cracking eggshell nanostructure
How is it that fertilized chicken eggs manage to resist fracture from the outside, while at the same time, are weak enough to break from the inside during chick hatching? It's all in the eggshell's nanostructure, according to a new study led by McGill University scientists. (2018-03-30)

A crystal method
UCSB researchers unlock another piece of the puzzle that is crystal growth. (2018-01-30)

Plant defense following the iron-maiden principle
Calcium phosphate is a typical component of teeth. It has recently been shown that plants of the rock nettle family also use this very hard mineral in their „teeth (2017-12-20)

Silky secrets to make bones
A study activated genes in human stem cells that initiate biomineralization, a key step in bone formation, according to a science team from Tufts University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Nottingham Trent University. Scientists engineered spider web silk combined with silica to activate cell membrane protein receptor integrin. The research will help scientists model intracellular pathways that govern bone formation and efforts to cure diseases such as osteoporosis and calcific aortic valve disease. (2017-12-19)

The sea cucumber genome points to genes for tissue regeneration
A new high-definition genome sequence of the sea cucumber provides molecular insights into its ability to regenerate, according to a new study publishing Oct. 12, in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Xiaojun Zhang, Lina Sun, Hongsheng Yang and Jianhai Xiang, of the Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and colleagues. (2017-10-12)

Korean researchers discover the biomechanism behind the formation of mother-of-pearl
Professor Hyung Joon Cha and Dr. So Yeong Bahn at Pohang University of Science and Technology, in collaboration with Professor Yoo Seong Choi at Chungnam National University, have shed light on the key mechanism behind the formation of nacre. The team has discovered the role of the matrix protein Pif80 from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and its involvement in the development of the nacre. (2017-09-03)

Virus with an eggshell
Avian flu can be transmitted from birds to humans; transmission among humans, however, is limited. The reason may be an eggshell-like mineral layer that the virus acquires due to the high calcium concentration in the intestines of birds. As reported by Chinese researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie, these mineralized viruses are significantly more infectious and, in addition, more robust and heat stable than the native viruses. (2017-08-18)

Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technology
When it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice -- even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics. Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed bio-inspired dynamic templates used to manufacture organic semiconductor materials that produce printable electronics. It uses a process similar to biomineralization -- the way that bones and teeth form. This technique is eco-friendly, which gives the researchers the chance to return the favor to nature. (2017-07-13)

New approach improves ability to predict metals' reactions with water
The wide reach of corrosion, a multitrillion-dollar global problem, may someday be narrowed considerably thanks to a new, better approach to predict how metals react with water. (2017-06-16)

Utilizing tumor suppressor proteins to shape nanomaterials
A new method combining tumor suppressor protein p53 and biomineralization peptide BMPep successfully created hexagonal silver nanoplates, suggesting an efficient strategy for controlling the nanostructure of inorganic materials. (2017-05-03)

Making spines from sea water
How do creatures like sea urchins take up the calcium they need to build hard structures? (2017-04-06)

Nanocages for gold particles: What is happening inside?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have used high-resolution crystallography to uncover the mechanism behind protein-assisted synthesis of gold nanoparticles, providing a platform for designing nanomaterials tailored for biomedical application. (2017-03-16)

Making spines from sea water
How do creatures like sea urchins take up the calcium they need to build hard structures? (2016-12-05)

5 USC professors named fellows of prestigious science organization
Five USC scientists have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their academic peers. (2016-11-21)

Atom-by-atom growth chart for shells helps decode past climate
For the first time scientists can see how the shells of tiny marine organisms grow atom-by-atom, a new study reports. The advance provides new insights into the mechanisms of biomineralization and will improve our understanding of environmental change in Earth's past. (2016-10-24)

Natural mother of pearl structure, synthetic replication
Chemists at the University of Konstanz, in cooperation with the University of Science and Technology of China, synthetically reproduced the structural configuration of natural mother of pearl or 'nacre.' (2016-08-19)

Plants are 'biting' back
Calcium phosphate is a widespread biomineral in the animal kingdom: Bones and teeth largely consist of this very tough mineral substance. Researchers from Bonn University could now for the first time demonstrate the presence of calcium phosphate as a structural biomineral in higher plants. The substance provides the necessary 'bite' to the stinging hairs of representatives of the rock nettle family (Loasaceae). It hardens the trichomes, which serve as a herbivore defense. (2016-05-19)

New insights on how oysters form shells
Researchers know that several proteins are involved in oyster shell formation, but how expression of these proteins is controlled is not well understood. Now investigators report that they have identified a protein called Pf-POU3F4 that promotes expression of two of these proteins, called Aspein and Prismalin-14. (2016-05-03)

Coral 'toolkit' allows floating larvae to transform into reef skeletons
In a study published today, researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Rutgers University, and the University of Haifa identified key and novel components of the molecular 'toolkit' that allow corals to build their skeletons (called biomineralization) and described when -- in the transformation from floating larvae to coral skeleton -- these components are used. (2016-04-26)

Could bread mold build a better rechargeable battery?
You probably don't think much of fungi, and especially those that turn bread moldy, but researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 17, 2016 have evidence that might just change your mind. Their findings suggest that a red bread mold could be the key to producing more sustainable electrochemical materials for use in rechargeable batteries. (2016-03-17)

A surprising makeover turns an ordinary protein into a magnetic sculptor
By studying an unusual group of magnetic microorganisms, scientists at UC Berkeley have uncovered a new and unexpected function for a ubiquitous protein family. In a paper publishing in the open-access journal PLOS Biology on March 16, the Komeili lab and collaborators, have now shown that a bacterial protein called MamO has been transformed from a common protease to an inactive enzyme that helps to build magnetic nanoparticles using a novel metal-binding motif. (2016-03-16)

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