Current Biomolecules News and Events

Current Biomolecules News and Events, Biomolecules News Articles.
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Quantum leaps in understanding how living corals survive
A new imaging technique has been developed to improve our ability to visualize and track the symbiotic interactions between coral and algae in response to globally warming sea surface temperatures and deepening seawaters. (2021-02-15)

Lasing mechanism found in water droplets
As reported in Advanced Photonics, Chen's NTU team recently discovered that when a water droplet interacts with a surface to form a contact angle, the interfacial molecular forces determine the geometry of a droplet resonator. Dramatic mechanical changes at the interface play a significant role in the optical oscillation of droplet resonators. (2021-01-28)

Nanomedicine's 'crown' is ready for its close up
An international team of researchers led by Michigan State University's Morteza Mahmoudi has developed a new method to better understand how nanomedicines -- emerging diagnostics and therapies that are very small yet very intricate -- interact with patients' biomolecules. (2021-01-25)

Titanium oxide nanotubes facilitate low-cost laser-assisted photoporation
Toyohashi University of Technology developed a nanosecond pulse laser-assisted photoporation method using titanium-oxide nanotubes (TNTs) for highly efficient and low-cost intracellular delivery. HeLa - human cervical cancer cells were cultured in the nanotubes and submerged in a solution of biomolecules. After cells were exposed to nanosecond pulse laser, we successfully delivered propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent dextran into cells with high efficiency and cell viability. (2021-01-25)

Not as simple as thought: How bacteria form membrane vesicles
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which bacteria form membrane vesicles, which bacteria employ to communicate with each other or to defend themselves against antibiotics. By studying mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MCB), which also includes tuberculosis-causing bacteria, the researchers demonstrated that environmental stimuli dictate the route by which the MCB form membrane vesicles. Further, their observations were consistent among various MCB. This study has implications for vaccine development as well as novel therapies. (2021-01-14)

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life
A breakthrough that has implications for molecular biology, pharmacology and nanotechnologies. The fields of application are many. Identifying the mechanisms behind neurodegenerative processes in some proteins, for example, can help limit their proliferation. Understanding how a protein takes on a certain shape can open the way to use the nanomachines that nature has designed to cut, edit or block damaged or defective genes. Their study was published in the international academic journal Physical Review Letters (2021-01-14)

Johns Hopkins scientist develops method to find toxic chemicals in drinking water
Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts. (2021-01-12)

How the circadian clock regulates liver genes in time and space
EPFL scientists have carried out the first comprehensive study of how genes in the liver perform their metabolic functions in both space and time of day. Monitoring almost 5000 genes at the level of the individual cell across a 24-hour period, the researchers have modelled how the circadian clock and liver functions crosstalk throughout the day in sync with the feeding-fasting cycle. (2021-01-11)

Faulty metabolism of Parkinson's medication in the brain linked to severe side effects
Until now, the reason why the drug levodopa (L-Dopa), which reduces the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, declines in efficacy after a few years' use has been unknown. A side effect that then often occur is involuntary movements. A Swedish-French collaboration, led from Uppsala University, has now been able to connect the problems with defective metabolism of L-Dopa in the brain. The study is published in Science Advances. (2021-01-07)

High-speed atomic force microscopy takes on intrinsically disordered proteins
Kanazawa University's pioneering high-speed atomic force microscope technology has now shed light on the structure and dynamics of some of life's most ubiquitous and inscrutable molecules - intrinsically disordered proteins. The study is reported in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-12-28)

Covid-19: contaminated surfaces as a risk factor
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic poses a threat to the health of millions of people worldwide. Respiratory viruses, including the pathogen SARS-CoV-2, can be transmitted both via the air and through contact with contaminated objects. Scientists from the Department of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry at Paderborn University have investigated what promotes the adhesion of viruses to surfaces. This involved examining the proteins that make up the viral envelope. (2020-12-18)

Natural environmental conditions facilitate the uptake of microplastics into living cells
The environment is polluted by microplastics worldwide. A research team at the University of Bayreuth has now discovered that microplastic particles find their way into living cells more easily if they were exposed to natural aquatic environments, i.e. fresh water and seawater. Biomolecules occurring in the water are deposited on the microplastic surfaces, which promote the internalization of the particles into cells. (2020-12-10)

Weathered microplastic particles, readily internalized by mouse cells, may pose a greater risk than pristine ones
Microplastic particles exposed to freshwater or saltwater environments for several weeks are about 10 times more likely than pristine particles to be absorbed by mouse cells, due to a crust of microorganisms and biomolecules that forms on the particles' surfaces, according to a new study. The results indicate that this crust acts as a biomolecular 'Trojan horse.' (2020-12-09)

New plant-based gel to fast-track 'mini-organs' growth, improve cancer treatment
Monash University researchers have created the world's first bioactive plant-based nanocellulose hydrogel to support organoid growth for biomedical applications. This includes cancer development and treatment. (2020-11-24)

New findings speed progress towards affordable gene therapy
In a promising advance for affordable, personalised medicine, researchers have used metal-organic frameworks to successfully deliver the genetic snipping tool CRISPR/Cas9 into human cancer cells. (2020-11-20)

Sensors get a laser shape up
Laser writing breathes life into high-performance sensing platforms. (2020-11-15)

Lighting the way to selective membrane imaging
A team of scientists at Kanazawa University have shown how water-soluble tetraphenylethene molecules can become fluorescent when aggregating at a biomembrane-mimetic liquid-liquid interface. This work may lead to new optical molecular probes and smart vesicles for delivering pharmaceuticals directly to cells. (2020-11-04)

Dynamic photonic barcodes record energy transfer at the biointerface
Chen's group recently developed bioresponsive dynamic barcodes, introducing the concept of resonance energy transfer at the interface of the microcavity. (2020-10-30)

Identifying biomolecule fragments in ionising radiation
In a new study published in EPJ D, researchers define for the first time the precise exact ranges in which positively and negatively charged fragments can be produced when living cells are bombarded with fast, heavy ions. (2020-10-29)

Discovery of pH-dependent 'switch' in interaction between pair of protein molecules
All biological processes are in some way pH-dependent. Our human bodies, and those of other organisms, need to maintain specific- and constant- pH regulation in order to function. Changes in pH can have serious biological consequences or, as researchers at the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) found, serious benefits. (2020-10-23)

Making bones is less difficult than was previously thought
The way in which bone formation occurs needs to be redefined. This was revealed by Radboud university medical center researchers and their colleagues in a publication in Nature Communications. It turns out that bone formation does not require complex biomolecules in collagen at all. This means that the production of bone substitutes and biomaterials is less complicated than was previously thought. (2020-10-08)

Searching for the chemistry of life
In the search for the chemical origins of life, researchers have found a possible alternative path for the emergence of the characteristic DNA pattern: According to the experiments, the characteristic DNA base pairs can form by dry heating, without water or other solvents. The team led by Ivan Halasz from the Ru?er Boškovi? Institute and Ernest Meštrovi? from the pharmaceutical company Xellia presents its observations from DESY's X-ray source PETRA III in the journal Chemical Communications. (2020-10-02)

Research shows cell perturbation system could have medical applications
Research by a team from Northwestern Engineering shows that the Nanofountain Probe Electroporation system may lead to quicker and more customized medical treatment plans. (2020-10-02)

Dipanjan Pan demonstrates new method to produce gold nanoparticles in cancer cells
Researchers published a seminal study in Nature Communications that demonstrates for the first time a method of biosynthesizing plasmonic gold nanoparticles within cancer cells, without the need for conventional bench-top lab methods. It has the potential to notably expand biomedical applications. (2020-09-11)

A spicy silver lining
Researchers David Omar Oseguera-Galindo and Eden Oceguera-Contreras, both of the University of Guadalajara, Mexico, and Dario Pozas-Zepeda of the University of Colima, Mexico, recently studied the effect of habanero pepper in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Their research, published in the Journal of Nanophotonics, resulted in a simple, low-cost, ecofriendly method of obtaining silver nanoparticles. (2020-09-03)

Attacking tumors directly on identification
The combination of a biomolecule and a metal complex can target, bind, mark and damage cancer cells. A German-Spanish team has manufactured such a theranostic agent that visualises tumour cells by irradiation with visible light, and proved its effectiveness against lung cancer cells. (2020-09-02)

Nanocatalysts that remotely control chemical reactions inside living cells
POSTECH professor In Su Lee's research team develops a magnetic field-induced heating 'hollow nanoreactors'. (2020-08-09)

Measuring electron emission from irradiated biomolecules
Through a study published in EPJ D, researchers have successfully determined the characteristics of electron emission when high-velocity ions collide with adenine - one of the four key nucleobases of DNA. (2020-08-07)

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)

'Seeing' and 'manipulating' functions of living cells
Toyohashi University of Technology has given greater functionalities to atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our research team has succeeded in minimally invasive surgery to living cells using photocatalytic oxidation controlled in a nanoscale space and visualizing dynamic information on intracellular biomolecules. This proposed technique for controlling and visualizing the process of cell function expression on a high level has significant potential as a strong nanofabrication and nanomeasurement system to solve the mystery of life. (2020-07-22)

Biosignatures may reveal a wealth of new data locked inside old fossils
Step aside, skeletons -- a new world of biochemical ''signatures'' found in all kinds of ancient fossils is revealing itself to paleontologists, providing a new avenue for insights into major evolutionary questions. (2020-07-12)

Oncotarget: Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning can drive resistance to EMT
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 published ''Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning during cell division can drive resistance to EMT'' by Jia et al. which reported that Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse process mesenchymal-epithelial transition are central to metastatic aggressiveness and therapy resistance in solid tumors. (2020-07-07)

Regenerating the body from within using biomaterials
Successful tissue regeneration can have major benefits in healing injuries or replacing portions of diseased or damaged tissue But the effectiveness of the body's own system for repairing such damage can vary greatly. In a recent publication in Nature Reviews Materials, Ali Khademhosseini, Ph.D., Director and CEO of the Terasaki Institute, and colleagues discuss the use of biomaterials, which can be used in various ways to boost the body's ability to heal, for tissue regeneration. (2020-07-06)

Well packed
Biomacromolecules incorporated into tailored metal-organic frameworks using peptide modulators are well shielded but highly active thanks to carefully tuned nanoarchitecture. As scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this strategy can be used to synthesize an ''artificial cell'' that functions as an optical glucose sensor. (2020-07-01)

New indication of a link between Alzheimer's and diabetes
Pathological protein clumps are characteristic of a series of diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and type 2 diabetes. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, and Maastricht University have now used cryo-electron microscopy to obtain a sharp image for the first time of how individual molecules are arranged in protein strings, which constitute the deposits typical for diabetes. The structure of the fibrils is very similar to that of Alzheimer's fibrils. (2020-06-15)

Ancient asteroid impacts created the ingredients of life on Earth and Mars
A new study reveals that asteroid impact sites in the ocean may possess a crucial link in explaining the formation of the essential molecules for life. The study discovered the emergence of amino acids that serve as the building blocks for proteins - demonstrating the role of meteorites in bringing life's molecules to earth, and potentially Mars. (2020-06-08)

Fluorescence bioimaging
Scientists can monitor biomolecular processes in live tissue by noninvasive optical methods, such as fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent dyes used for that purpose are often rather unstable, and photobleaching, lack of specificity, and poor pharmacokinetics are recurrent issues. US scientists have developed a molecular shield that stabilizes near-infrared fluorescent dyes and enhances their functionality. Their synthesis and characterization are reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-06-04)

Taking a deep look into animals
Advances in neuroscience research and microscopy: a new technique makes it possible to clear a wide variety of different animals, making them transparent and allowing researchers to look deep into their organs and nervous systems. (2020-05-29)

CSIC researchers use whole living cells as 'templates' to seek for bioactive molecules
A study performed by researchers at the Institute for Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia (IQAC-CSIC) from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) pioneers the use of whole living cells (human lung adenocarcinoma) in dynamic combinatorial chemistry systems. This research, published in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, proposes a new methodology to discover new bioactive molecules in a realistic biological medium. This methodology could help in the future to develop methods to differentiate healthy versus cancer cells, or to protect the extracellular matrix against pathogens. (2020-05-27)

Lighting up cells with genetically-encoded X-ray-sensitive probes
Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy provides a unique approach for direct imaging a whole cell with its intrinsic nanoscale resolution. However, the lack of appropriate labels hampers its widespread use as compared to fluorescence super-resolution microscopy. A group of scientists in China repurposed peroxidases as genetically-encoded endogenous X-ray-sensitive tags, which allows nanoscale localization of protein-of-interest in mammalian cells. (2020-05-18)

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