Current Biosynthesis News and Events

Current Biosynthesis News and Events, Biosynthesis News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 11 | 436 Results
Integrating maths and plant science to explain how plant roots generate a hormone gradient
The research team that developed a biosensor that first recorded that a distinct gradient of the plant growth hormone gibberellin correlated with plant cell size has now revealed how this distribution pattern is created in roots. (2021-02-15)

How the 3-D structure of eye-lens proteins is formed
Chemical bonds within the eye-lens protein gamma-B crystallin hold the protein together and are therefore important for the function of the protein within the lens. Contrary to previous assumptions, some of these bonds, called disulphide bridges, are already formed simultaneously with the synthesis of the protein in the cell. This is what scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics and the French Institute de Biologie Structurale in Grenoble have discovered. (2021-02-10)

Combination therapy with radiation shows promise in treating glioblastoma
In a study of mice, researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new approach that combines an anti-psychotic drug, a statin used to lower high cholesterol levels, and radiation to improve the overall survival in mice with glioblastoma (2021-02-09)

Scientists extract pigments from algae for food supplements
In the framework of the Chlorella microalgae cultivation process, the researchers obtained microalgae biomass with a high content of carotenoid pigments, which is suitable for the food industry through targeted cultivation. (2021-02-04)

Synthesis of potent antibiotic follows unusual chemical pathway
Images of a protein involved in creating a potent antibiotic reveal the unusual first steps of the antibiotic's synthesis. The improved understanding of the chemistry behind this process, detailed in a new study led by Penn State chemists, could allow researchers to adapt this and similar compounds for use in human medicine. (2021-01-18)

Wistar reports new class of antibiotics active against a wide range of bacteria
Wistar Institute scientists have discovered a new class of compounds that uniquely combine direct antibiotic killing of pan drug-resistant bacterial pathogens with a simultaneous rapid immune response for combatting antimicrobial resistance (AMR). These finding were published today in Nature. (2020-12-23)

New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
Using an unusual, light-dependent enzyme and a newly discovered enzymatic mechanism, researchers from Aarhus University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have enabled the biological synthesis of high-yield industry relevant production of climate neutral drop-in fuels from biowaste. The study along with the new discovery has been published in Nature Communications. (2020-12-17)

Scientists found out genes involved in a compound in lichens with antiviral activity
Lichens are of great importance both ecologically and as a biological model. These organisms produce a wide range of secondary metabolites, including usnic acid, a compound with unknown biological function but which in-vitro studies have found to present antiviral, neuroprotective and anti-cancer activity. An international research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has identified the cluster of biosynthetic genes involved in the production of this compound. (2020-12-11)

A comprehensive review of biosynthesis of inorganic nanomaterials using microorganisms and bacteriophages
A KAIST bioprocess engineering research team conducted a summary of 146 biosynthesized single and multi-element inorganic nanomaterials covering 55 elements in the periodic table synthesized using wild-type and genetically engineered microorganisms. Their research highlights the diverse applications of biogenic nanomaterials and gives strategies for improving the biosynthesis of nanomaterials in terms of their producibility, crystallinity, size, and shape. (2020-12-07)

Warwick scientists design model to predict cellular drug targets against COVID-19
A computational model of a human lung cell has been used to understand how SARS-CoV-2 draws on human host cell metabolism to reproduce by researchers at the University of Warwick. This study helps understand how the virus uses the host to survive, and enable drug predictions for treating the virus to be made. (2020-11-25)

Tackling metabolic complexity
CRISPRi screens reveal sources of metabolic robustness in E. coli. (2020-11-24)

Newly discovered enzyme helps make valuable bioactive saponins
A team led by researchers from Osaka University discovered a new enzyme, closely related to the CSyGT family of enzymes involved in producing cellulose in plant cell walls. Unexpectedly, they found the new enzyme is responsible for a key step in the biosynthesis of saponins, bioactive products with high-value applications in medicine and the food industry. The new enzyme opens up novel routes for commercial production of these valuable compounds in microbial cells. (2020-11-16)

Trehalose 6-phosphate promotes seed filling by activating auxin biosynthesis
Plants undergo several developmental transitions during their life cycle. The differentiation of the young embryo from a meristem like structure into a highly specialized storage organ, is believed to be controlled by local connections between sugars and hormonal response systems. By modulating the trehalose 6?phosphate (T6P) content in growing embryos of pea (Pisum sativum), an international research team led by the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) investigated the role of this signaling sugar during the seed?filling process. (2020-11-05)

????Strain of rhizobacteria shown to naturally and sustainably promote rice growth
''Our study has demonstrated that B. pumilus LZP02 colonizes rice roots and promotes growth by improving carbohydrate metabolism and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis,'' explained Zhigang Wang, one of the scientists involved in the research. ''These findings show a new light on how microbes and plants communicate in a friendly way.'' (2020-11-04)

UC studies tobacco use, cancer connection
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have identified new clues into ways tobacco use impacts patients with kidney cancer. (2020-10-20)

Princeton lab discovers small "Cain-and-Abel" molecule
A new bacterial molecule with the unsavory tendency to track down and kill others of its own kind has been discovered in the human microbiome by researchers at Princeton's Department of Chemistry. Named Streptosactin, it is the first small molecule found to exhibit fratricidal activity, according to a paper published in JACS. (2020-09-14)

Dipanjan Pan demonstrates new method to produce gold nanoparticles in cancer cells
Researchers published a seminal study in Nature Communications that demonstrates for the first time a method of biosynthesizing plasmonic gold nanoparticles within cancer cells, without the need for conventional bench-top lab methods. It has the potential to notably expand biomedical applications. (2020-09-11)

Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilisers. (2020-09-04)

Imaging an estrogen related enzyme may help to predict obesity, self-control issues
Findings to be published in PNAS from a positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging study of the amygdala reveals that low levels of the enzyme aromatase, which catalyzes estrogen biosynthesis, are associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and lower self-control, as measured by a standard personality test. (2020-08-31)

New genetic markers of glucosinolates in rapeseed may help improve oil composition
A group of scientists performed a genetic analysis of the Russian rapeseed collection. The research was published in the Genes journal. Scientists described the genetic diversity of Russian rapeseed lines and discovered new candidate genes that are potentially involved in controlling the content of glucosinolates, toxic secondary metabolites in rapeseed oil. Their findings can be used by crop breeders to improve the rapeseed oil composition. (2020-08-27)

Discovery could lead to more potent garlic, boosting flavor and bad breath
Their work could boost the malodorous - yet delicious - characteristics that garlic-lovers the world over savor. (2020-08-05)

Projecting early molecular signatures of AD through the convergence study of Omics and AI
Dr. Cheon Mookyung of KBRI published the research results in an international academic journal of computational biology. (2020-08-05)

UQ researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unravelling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers. (2020-07-09)

Study reveals how bacteria build essential carbon-fixing machinery
Scientists from the University of Liverpool have revealed new insight into how cyanobacteria construct the organelles that are essential for their ability to photosynthesise. (2020-07-08)

UTEP researchers help bring biofriendly materials to drug design for neuro disorders
The contributions of researchers from The University of Texas at El Paso have yielded the first indication that carbon quantum dots, a class of nanoparticles, can be utilized to combat neurological disorders, according to a paper published in the journal Processes as part its special issue on protein biosynthesis and drug design and delivery. (2020-06-05)

Metal collector made of bacteria
Bacteria, fungi and plants sometimes produce metal-binding substances that can be harnessed, for example for the extraction of raw materials, for their separation, for cleaning soils or for medical purposes. Professor Dirk Tischler, Head of the Microbial Biotechnology research group at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB), outlines how these natural substances or modified semi-artificial variants of them can be produced according to genetic information in an article in Natural Product Reports from May 19, 2020. (2020-05-26)

Algal genome provides insights into first land plants
Cornell researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many clues to how aquatic plants first colonized land. (2020-05-22)

Deciphering the fine neuroendocrine regulatory system during development
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that Crz is a key molecule for body size adjustment during the larval stage. Using Drosophila melanogaster, they demonstrated that Crz controls basal ecdysteroid biosynthesis by acting on PTTH-producing neurons during only a specific larval stage to facilitate larval transition to the next stage. These findings help understand how growth and maturation are regulated during development. (2020-05-20)

New study by Clemson scientists could pave way to cure of global parasite
Clemson University scientists have taken another step forward in their quest to find a cure for a notorious parasite that has infected more than 40 million Americans and many times that number around the world. (2020-05-18)

How a mint became catmint
Catmint -- or catnip -- is well-known for its intoxicating effect on cats. The odor responsible for the cats' strange behavior is nepetalactone, a volatile iridoid. Researchers have now found that the ability to produce iridoids had already been lost in ancestors of catmint. Hence, nepetalactone biosynthesis is the result of 'repeated evolution.' However, nepetalactone differs considerably from other iridoids with regards to its chemical structure and properties, and most likely its ecological functions. (2020-05-13)

Leap forward in the discovery and development of new antibiotics
A powerful new insight, linked to recent studies by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), has provided a new understanding of Glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs) biosynthesis that allows new GPAs to be made and tested in the laboratory. This is vital in the quest to develop new antibiotics to keep pace with the ever-evolving 'superbugs' that continue to pose a serious threat to global public health. (2020-05-11)

Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in our body and thus ensure their survival. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now elucidated an important mechanism in this process. A transport protein involved in cell wall biosynthesis plays a key role, they report in the journal 'Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.' (2020-05-05)

IKBFU scientists have discovered a way to increase wheat immunity
A very original way to increase what can be conditionally called wheat immunity was suggested by the staff of the Laboratory of Natural Antioxidants at the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University. The results of the research, which were financed by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research and the government of the Kaliningrad region, were recently published in the Plants scientific journal. (2020-05-03)

Proteasome phase separation for destruction
Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMiMS) discovered proteasome-containing droplets, which are formed by acute hyperosmotic stress. The proteasome droplets also contain ubiquitin-tagged proteins and multiple interacting proteins, by which induce liquid-liquid phase separation of the proteasome for rapid degradation of unwanted proteins. The ubiquitin-dependent proteasome phase separation may be linked to clearance of aggregates that causes neurodegenerative diseases. These results were published in Nature. (2020-04-27)

High blood glucose levels may explain why some flu patients experience severe symptoms
Influenza A (a highly contagious virus that causes annual flu epidemics worldwide) may trigger an inflammatory 'cytokine storm' -- an excessive immune response that can lead to hospitalization or even death -- by increasing glucose metabolism, according to a new study. (2020-04-15)

Super-charging drug development for COVID-19
Researchers are using cell-free manufacturing to ramp up production of valinomycin, a promising drug that has proven effective in obliterating SARS-CoV in cellular cultures. (2020-04-13)

Skoltech researchers find a new HIT defense bacteria use against antibiotics
Scientists at the Severinov Laboratory in Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have uncovered a new mechanism of bacterial self-defense against microcin C, a potent antibiotic weapon in the microscopic world that can sometimes turn on its master. (2020-04-11)

UC San Diego researchers move closer to producing heparin in the lab
In a new study published in PNAS, UC San Diego researchers moved one step closer to the ability to make heparin in cultured cells. Heparin is a potent anti-coagulant and the most prescribed drug in hospitals, yet cell-culture-based production of heparin is currently not possible. Heparin is now produced by extracting the drug from pig intestines, which is a concern for safety, sustainability, and security reasons. (2020-04-10)

Wallflowers could lead to new drugs
Plant-derived chemicals called cardenolides - like digitoxin - have long been used to treat heart disease, and have shown potential as cancer therapies. But the compounds are very toxic, making it difficult for doctors to prescribe a dose that works without harming the patient. Researchers now show that the wormseed wallflower could be used as a model species to elucidate how plants biosynthesize cardenolides, knowledge that could aid the discovery and development of safer drugs. (2020-04-08)

An antibiotic masquerading as a natural compound in the Giant Madeiran Squill
A previous study has shown that a type of squill growing in Madeira produces a chemical compound that may be useful as a medicinal drug. But a new study from researchers at Uppsala University has shown that this is probably not true: instead, the plant had likely accumulated antibiotics from contaminated soil. (2020-04-03)

Page 1 of 11 | 436 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.