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Current Bird Species News and Events

Current Bird Species News and Events, Bird Species News Articles.
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Innocent and highly oxidizing
Freiburg chemists produce new oxidants as a tool for preparative chemistry (2020-06-03)
Human activity threatens 50 billion years of vertebrate evolutionary history
A new study maps for the first time the evolutionary history of the world's terrestrial vertebrates: amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles. (2020-06-03)
Global warming will lift agriculture weed threat
Invasive weeds pose a significant threat to global agriculture productivity -- and their threat will become more pronounced if the Earth's climate is affected by increased greenhouse gas concentration, according a Flinders University climate researcher. (2020-06-02)
Blood markers predict Humboldt penguin nest type, reproductive success
In a new study, researchers looked at metabolic markers in the blood of 30 Humboldt penguins nesting in the Punta San Juan Marine Protected Area in Peru. (2020-06-02)
Researchers study genetic outcomes of great gray owl population in four states
When compared to some other bird species, researchers found that great gray owls seem to have lower genetic diversity. (2020-06-02)
Big vegetarians of the reef drive fish evolution
New research finds fish diets, not geography, dictate how fast species evolve. (2020-06-01)
Loss of land-based vertebrates is accelerating, according to Stanford biologist and others
Analysis of thousands of vertebrate species reveals that extinction rates are likely much faster than previously thought. (2020-06-01)
Extended parenting helps young birds grow smarter
The current study analyzes social and life-history data from several thousand songbirds, including 127 corvids, the family that includes jays, crows, ravens, and magpies. (2020-05-31)
The wildlife trade encompasses all major branches of the biological tree of life
The wildlife trade is a multibillion-dollar industry that threatens biodiversity. (2020-05-26)
Can e-learning help stem the threat of invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed?
E-learning could be a crucial tool in the biosecurity fight against invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed, Zebra Mussels and Signal Crayfish according to a new study published in the academic journal 'Biological Invasions'. (2020-05-26)
Warming climate is changing where birds breed
Spring is in full swing. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and birds are singing. (2020-05-26)
A new Critically Endangered frog named after 'the man from the floodplain full of frogs'
A new species of a Critically Endangered miniaturised stump-toed frog of the genus Stumpffia found in Madagascar is named Stumpffia froschaueri after ''the man from the floodplain full of frogs'', Christoph Froschauer. (2020-05-25)
Marine species are outpacing terrestrial species in the race against global warming
Global warming is causing species to search for more temperate environments in which to migrate to, but it is marine species -- according to the latest results of a Franco-American study mainly involving scientists from the CNRS, Ifremer, the Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier and the University of Picardy Jules Verne -- that are leading the way by moving up to six times faster towards the poles than their terrestrial congeners. (2020-05-25)
What information is coded in bird alarm calls -- a new study from Korea
Recordings of the Oriental tit's alarm responses showed that alarm calls to snakes have special acoustic properties different from calls to chipmunks, even though both predators can enter bird's nests and destroy broods. (2020-05-25)
Scientists take first census of Arctic freshwater molluscs in 130 years
Based on previously released data and their own investigations, researchers at the St Petersburg University Laboratory of Macroecology and Biogeography of Invertebrates have assessed the diversity of freshwater molluscs in the Circumpolar region of the World. (2020-05-25)
New native grass species have been discovered on the Iberian Peninsula and Menorca
The new species belong to the genus Aira, delicate herbaceous plants, which enjoy their greatest diversity in the Mediterranean Region. (2020-05-22)
CRISPR a tool for conservation, not just gene editing
The gene-editing technology CRISPR has been used for a variety of agricultural and public health purposes -- from growing disease-resistant crops to, more recently, a diagnostic test for the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-05-21)
Divergence in flowering time contributes reproductive isolation between wild rice species
This study chose a pair of wild rice species (Oryza rufipogon and O. nivara) as a unique system to investigate the between-species reproductive isolation based on artificial crossing experiment and the flowering census from the common garden experiment. (2020-05-20)
Hunting threatens one of the world's most amazing wildlife migrations
As the world looks to tighten up the illegal capture of wildlife, migratory birds are being threatened by widespread and unsustainable hunting across the Asia-Pacific region. (2020-05-20)
Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
University of Tsukuba researchers identified a species of sea urchin with a relatively short breeding cycle of six months. (2020-05-19)
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind (2020-05-19)
How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?
The 'PaNDiv' experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases in nitrogen affect grasslands. (2020-05-19)
Ecosystem diversity drives the origin of new shark and ray species
Biologists how different oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of California and the Baja California Peninsula influenced formation of new species of sharks and rays. (2020-05-19)
Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds
Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology. (2020-05-18)
Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol. (2020-05-18)
Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals. (2020-05-18)
Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems. (2020-05-18)
New study records dual hand use in early human relative
Research by anthropologists at the University of Kent has identified hand use behavior in fossil human relatives that is consistent with modern humans. (2020-05-18)
Early Bird uses 10 times less energy to train deep neural networks
Rice engineers have found a way to train deep neural networks for a fraction of the energy required today. (2020-05-18)
Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
In a paper published in the journal Urban Ecosystems, University of Illinois at Chicago students from the departments of earth and environmental sciences and biological sciences have measured both the extent of wetland loss in Cook County since the time of the river reversal and the alterations in the animal populations. (2020-05-18)
Scientists discover why some birds live fast and die young
Size, safety and parenting all have an impact on how quickly a species of bird matures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield that could help scientists to understand and predict how animals will respond to climate breakdown and the destruction of habitats. (2020-05-14)
Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-05-14)
Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health. (2020-05-14)
Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Some birds are iridescent because of the physical make-up of their feathers, but scientists had never found evidence of this structural color in the group of birds containing ostriches and cassowaries -- until now. (2020-05-13)
The butterfly effect: Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
The long-term effects of climate change suggests that the butterfly effect is at work on butterflies in the alpine regions of North America, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists -- and the predictions don't bode well. (2020-05-12)
Early experiences determine how birds build their first nest
Early life experiences of zebra finches have a big effect on the construction of their first homes, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Science and the University of St. (2020-05-12)
Alaskan rainforests are a global lichen hotspot, new study shows
The rainforest fjords of Southeastern Alaska harbor one of the highest concentrations of lichen diversity found anywhere on Earth, according to a new study spearheaded by University of Alberta scientists. (2020-05-12)
New test identifies lobster hybrids
Scientists have developed a test that can identify hybrids resulting from crossbreeding between European and American lobsters. (2020-05-11)
Medicinal plants thrive in biodiversity hotspots
Scientists from Leipzig have shown a way to considerably simplify this search for bioactive natural compounds using data analyses on the phylogenetic relationships, spatial distribution and secondary metabolites of plants. (2020-05-11)
Seahorse and pipefish study by CCNY opens window to marine genetic diversity May 08, 2020
The direction of ocean currents can determine the direction of gene flow in rafting species, but this depends on species traits that allow for rafting propensity. (2020-05-08)
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