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Current Bird Species News and Events, Bird Species News Articles.
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There are way more species of horseshoe bats than scientists thought
Horseshoe bats are bizarre-looking animals with giant ears and elaborate flaps of skin on their noses that they use like satellite dishes. (2019-08-21)
Environmental DNA proves the expansion of invasive crayfish habitats
Environmental DNA (eDNA) has successfully proven the presence of invasive crayfish in almost all the small streams around Lake Akan in Japan, suggesting that eDNA analysis is an efficient and highly sensitive method to assess the distribution of aquatic organisms. (2019-08-21)
Poo transplants to help save koalas
Poo transplants are helping expand koala microbiomes, allowing the marsupials to eat a wider range of eucalypts and possibly survive habitat loss. (2019-08-20)
Connected forest networks on oil palm plantations key to protecting endangered species
Set-aside patches of high-quality forest on palm oil plantations may help protect species like orangutans, as well as various species of insects, birds and bats -- many of which are threatened with extinction in areas of Indonesia and Malaysia, where 85% of the world's palm oil is produced. (2019-08-20)
Climate is changing faster than animal adaptation
An international team of scientists reviewed more than 10,000 published climate change studies and has reached a sobering conclusion. (2019-08-20)
Some pregnant women are exposed to gadolinium in early pregnancy
A small but concerning number of women are exposed to a commonly used MRI contrast agent early in their pregnancy, likely before many of them are aware that they're pregnant, according to a new study. (2019-08-20)
Longline fishing hampering shark migration
Longline fisheries around the world are significantly affecting migrating shark populations, according to an international study featuring a University of Queensland researcher. (2019-08-20)
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon, study finds
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green sturgeon, a threatened species adapted to warmer water. (2019-08-20)
Global change is triggering an identity switch in grasslands
Since the first Homo sapiens emerged in Africa roughly 300,000 years ago, grasslands have sustained humanity and thousands of other species. (2019-08-19)
Early species developed much faster than previously thought, OHIO research shows
When Earth's species were rapidly diversifying nearly 500 million years ago, that evolution was driven by complex factors including global cooling, more oxygen in the atmosphere, and more nutrients in the oceans. (2019-08-15)
Extinct Caribbean bird yields DNA after 2,500 years in watery grave
Scientists have recovered the first genetic data from an extinct bird in the Caribbean, thanks to the remarkably preserved bones of a Creighton's caracara from a flooded sinkhole on Great Abaco Island. (2019-08-15)
Climate change 'disrupts' local plant diversity, study reveals
Researchers have discovered that the numbers of plant species recorded by botanists have increased in locations where the climate has changed most rapidly, and especially in relatively cold parts of the world. (2019-08-15)
Monkey malaria breakthrough offers cure for relapsing malaria
A breakthrough in monkey malaria research by two University of Otago scientists could help scientists diagnose and treat a relapsing form of human malaria. (2019-08-15)
AI used to test evolution's oldest mathematical model
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to make new discoveries, and confirm old ones, about one of nature's best-known mimics, opening up whole new directions of research in evolutionary biology. (2019-08-14)
New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed
The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. (2019-08-14)
Monster penguin find in Waipara, New Zealand
A new species of giant penguin -- about 1.6 metres tall -- has been identified from fossils found in Waipara, North Canterbury in New Zealand. (2019-08-14)
What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals
Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved. (2019-08-14)
Research bias may leave some primates at risk
Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University. (2019-08-14)
Rare antelopes and black cats
Numerous large mammals have been documented with video traps on Mount Kilimanjaro by a research group of W├╝rzburg University. (2019-08-14)
DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early
A team of scientists led by the University of Southampton have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely. (2019-08-13)
Scientists identify brain region that enables young songbirds to change their tune
In a scientific first, Columbia scientists have demonstrated how the brains of young songbirds become tuned to the songs they learn while growing up. (2019-08-12)
Scent brings all the songbirds to the yard
Lehigh University scientists found that not only can chickadees smell, but the males and females prefer the smell of their own species over the smell of the opposite species. (2019-08-12)
New diagnostic method for fungal infections could combat a major global health risk
A new study from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) has demonstrated how dual DNA barcoding could help improve the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases, giving patients access to potentially life-saving treatment much sooner. (2019-08-09)
Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife
Researchers conducted camera trap surveys within Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and five surrounding remnant forest fragments, finding 28 mammal species in the protected forest and 21 in the fragments -- including critically endangered species such as Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), along with species of conservation concern such as marbled cat (Pardofelis marmorata) and Asiatic golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii). (2019-08-08)
88% decline of big freshwater animals
Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: from 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88% -- twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean. (2019-08-08)
NZ big bird a whopping 'squawkzilla'
Australasian palaeontologists have discovered the world's largest parrot, standing up to 1m tall with a massive beak able to crack most food sources. (2019-08-06)
Knowing berry pests' varied diets may help control them
A Cornell University study, published in Ecological Entomology, investigates for the first time what spotted-wing drosophila adults and larvae eat, and where they lay their eggs, when these short-lived fruits are not in season. (2019-08-06)
A hog in wolf's clothing
Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. (2019-08-06)
How can robots land like birds?
Birds can perch on a wide variety of surfaces, thick or thin, rough or slick. (2019-08-06)
Wits University PhD student discovers new species of early dinosaur
The team of scientists, led by PhD Student Kimberley Chapelle, recognised that the dinosaur was not only a new species of sauropodomorph, but an entirely new genus. (2019-08-06)
'Mega-fires' may be too extreme even for a bird that loves fire
Fire is a natural part of western forests, but the changing nature of fire in many parts of North America may pose challenges for birds. (2019-08-06)
New Zealand's biodiversity will take millions of years to recover
The arrival of humans in New Zealand, some 700 years ago, triggered a wave of extinction among native bird species. (2019-08-05)
It would take 50 million years to recover New Zealand's lost bird species
Half of New Zealand's birds have gone extinct since humans arrived on the islands. (2019-08-05)
Study finds native bighorn sheep herds retain migratory diversity
A study led by Blake Lowrey found notable distinctions in the migrations of different types of bighorn sheep herds. (2019-08-02)
Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands
A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. (2019-08-02)
New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps
New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species. (2019-08-02)
Study suggests economic growth benefits wildlife but growing human populations do not
Analysis shows that while national-level economic growth and social development -- including more women in government -- are associated with more abundant wildlife, growing human populations are linked to wildlife decline. (2019-08-02)
Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes
Eleven new frog species were described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2019-08-02)
Fishing for insights into evolutionary change in the genome of frozen fish
Using decades-old frozen fish, researchers have discovered roots of rapid evolutionary adaptation to human activity in the Anthropocene. (2019-08-01)
Species aren't adapting fast enough to cope with climate change, according to new study
Many species are adapting to climate change, but those adaptations aren't occurring fast enough to guarantee their long-term survival, according to a recent study that analyzed 10,000 published scientific papers. (2019-08-01)
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