Current Bladder Cancer News and Events | Page 25

Current Bladder Cancer News and Events, Bladder Cancer News Articles.
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Investigating how 'chemo brain' develops in cancer patients
During and after chemotherapy, many cancer patients describe feeling a mental fog, a condition that has been dubbed 'chemo brain.' Why this happens is unclear, but researchers have found a new clue to understanding this syndrome. A study in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience reports that chemotherapy in rats affects their chemical messengers dopamine and serotonin, which are associated with cognition. (2016-05-25)

Study finds breast and ovarian cancer may have similar origins
While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. These facts reflect the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. A new study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, describes a new concept of how these two cancers may evolve in a similar way and may eventually lead to more effective therapies for both. (2016-05-23)

Understanding the mechanics of the urinary bladder
Dr. S. Roccabianca and Dr. T.R. Bush, researchers from Michigan State University compiled an extensive review of the key contributions to understanding the mechanics of the bladder ranging from work conducted in the 1970s through the present time with a focus on material testing and theoretical modeling. The review appears in a forthcoming issue of the journal TECHNOLOGY. (2016-05-20)

Researchers reveal how a new class of drugs kills cancer cells
A team of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers has worked out how a new class of anti-cancer drugs kills cancer cells, a finding that helps explain how cancer cells may become resistant to treatment. (2016-05-20)

Fighting cancer with the help of someone else's immune cells
A new step in cancer immunotherapy: researchers from the Netherlands Cancer Institute and University of Oslo/Oslo University Hospital show that even if one's own immune cells cannot recognize and fight their tumors, someone else's immune cells might. Their proof of principle study is published in the journal Science on May 19. (2016-05-19)

Hot tubs and swimming pools are not as clean as you may think
Whether water is hot in a tub or cold in a pool, it can bring immediate relief from stress or summer heat. But hot tubs and swimming pools are not always as clean as you might think, even when disinfected. In a new study in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, scientists have found that the more these facilities are used, the more potentially harmful compounds they contain. (2016-05-18)

Biomarker may predict endometrial cancer recurrences
New research from the lab of Martina Bazzaro, Ph.D., of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, suggests the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 as a promising biomarker for identifying risk of recurrence in endometrial cancer patients. (2016-05-18)

HIV-infected patients more likely to lack cancer treatment
A new study finds HIV-infected patients with cancer in the United States appear to be less likely to receive cancer treatment, regardless of insurance and other existing health conditions. (2016-05-17)

Blocking apoptotic response could preserve fertility in women receiving cancer treatments
Female cancer patients of reproductive age could preserve their fertility during radiation and chemotherapy through treatments that target the DNA damage response in oocytes (the cells that develop into eggs), an approach that works in animal models. (2016-05-17)

Physical activity associated with lower risk for many cancers
Higher levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with lower risks for 13 types of cancers, according to a new study published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. (2016-05-16)

E. coli 'anchors' provide novel way to hijack superbugs
Australian scientists may have found a way to stop deadly bacteria from infecting patients. The discovery could lead to a whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs.' The researchers have uncovered what may be an Achilles heel on the bacteria cell membrane that could act as a potential novel drug target. (2016-05-16)

Findings expand potential of cancer drug
New research from the Canadian Cancer Trials Group has discovered that a new subset of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer could benefit from taking the drug cetuximab. (2016-05-13)

More urinary tract stones are being treated with surgery
Researchers in Oxford who analyzed recent trends related to urinary tract stones in the UK found a sustained and high prevalence of the condition, with an increased trend to treat patients with surgery. (2016-05-12)

Quality of life meets cure for prostate cancer treatment
A new paper looks at how MRI and a clear understanding of the functional anatomy around the prostate can allow radiation oncologists to plan a course of treatment for patients with prostate cancer that spares these critical structures. (2016-05-11)

New research gives deeper understanding of why some breast cancers are hard to treat
Scientists have unearthed crucial new genetic information about how breast cancer develops and the genetic changes which can be linked to survival. (2016-05-10)

Research discovers mechanism that causes cancer cells to escape from the immune system
Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center found that when cancer cells are able to block the function of a gene called NLRC5, they are able to evade the immune system and form tumors, according to research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The discovery indicates NLRC5 as a novel biomarker for cancer patient survival and therapeutic response, as well as a potential target for new treatments. (2016-05-10)

Nuclear DNA gets cut and activates immune system to attack cancer cells
The enzyme MUS81 cuts DNA in the nucleus of cancer cells, causing the cut DNA to move to the cytoplasm instead of becoming degraded. The out-of-place DNA triggers an immune response against cancer cells. Discovering this new means of enhancing anti-cancer immune responses could lead to more effective cancer therapies using a combination of a MUS81-stimulating drug and an immunotherapy. (2016-05-10)

Can gender play a role in determining cancer treatment choices?
It is well known that men and women differ in terms of cancer susceptibility, survival and mortality, but exactly why this occurs at a molecular level has been poorly understood. (2016-05-09)

MUSC Hollings awarded $8.9 million to study sphingolipid signaling
The MUSC Hollings Cancer Center received an $8.9 million grant from the NCI designed to foster collaboration across clinical and laboratory research for the study of signaling in sphingolipids, a class of lipids known to be involved in the growth of solid tumor cancers. The PPG, led by Besim Ogretmen, Ph.D., includes a Phase II trial with a new therapy (YELIVA™ (ABC294640)) for liver cancer. (2016-05-09)

Discovery of lung cancer mutations responsive to targeted therapies and to immunotherapies
Researchers from several major US universities and ITMO University in Russia have identified a number of new driver mutations in lung cancer cells that may be responsive to genomically targeted therapies and to immunotherapy. (2016-05-09)

Patient-physician communication is critical for prostate cancer survivors' health
For prostate cancer patients who had their prostates surgically removed, patient-physician communication was key for helping them cope with their disease and for improving their health-related quality of life. (2016-05-04)

Ovary removal may increase the risk of colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer may rise in women who have their ovaries removed, according to new research. (2016-05-04)

Herbal remedies are an overlooked global health hazard
Scientists raise are raising awareness that long-term use of herbal remedies is no guarantee of their safety. Herbal remedies are an overlooked global hazard. (2016-05-03)

Double-blinded randomized controlled trial of the Xiao procedure in children
Researchers at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital report the results of a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of the 'Xiao procedure' in children with spina bifida who suffer from neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The Xiao procedure was touted for many years in China as being more than 80 percent effective in such patients. In the present study population, the researchers found the procedure to be ineffective in all patients at producing bladder control. (2016-05-03)

Elevated bladder cancer risk in New England and arsenic in drinking water
A new study has found that drinking water from private wells, particularly dug wells established during the first half of the 20th century, may have contributed to the elevated risk of bladder cancer that has been observed in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont for over 50 years. (2016-05-02)

Exposure to particulate air pollutants associated with numerous types of cancer
Long-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter, a mixture of environmental pollutants, was associated with increased risk of mortality for many types of cancer in an elderly Hong Kong population. (2016-04-29)

Exposure to particulate air pollutants associated with numerous cancers
Researchers have found that long-term exposure to environmental pollutants was associated with increased risk of mortality for many types of cancer in an elderly Hong Kong population. (2016-04-29)

Study pinpoints mechanism that allows cells with faulty DNA to reproduce
University of Minnesota researchers have figured out how some cells do an end-run on replication quality control -- opening the door to developing new cancer-quashing treatments. (2016-04-28)

Narrow band imaging can reduce recurrence of bladder tumors
Research into bladder tumor surgery has found that using narrow band imaging can significantly reduce the risk of disease recurrence. (2016-04-28)

UH Seidman Cancer Center first in the world to apply SBRT
University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center physicians have started the world's first clinical trial using a new form of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to deliver radiation to a specific area of the prostate invaded with cancer -- instead of the entire gland. The study aims to determine if treating a targeted cancer region within the prostate in early stage prostate cancer can increase treatment options and reduce the side effects of radiation. (2016-04-27)

Emergency general surgical procedures that account for most complications, deaths and costs
Only seven procedures account for approximately 80 percent of all admissions, deaths, complications, and inpatient costs attributable to operative emergency general surgery nationwide, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery. (2016-04-27)

Researchers look for causes of unexpected early bladder cancer recurrence after laparoscopic surgery
Although laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) and robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) continue to grow in popularity and are successful in the treatment of bladder cancer, they are still considered experimental approaches. Using data collected by the Section of Uro-Technology of the European Association of Urology, a team of researchers found that about 5 percent of patients experienced unexpected relapses of cancer after LRC, even with favorable pathology. Their results are reported in The Journal of Urology®. (2016-04-26)

Patients with low literacy levels get health information from commercial websites
When searching the internet for health information, people with less education and lower literacy levels are more likely to visit poorer quality commercial websites, according to a study published in the ARC Journal of Urology. (2016-04-26)

Infection alert in catheters could tackle hospital superbugs
A new infection alert system in catheters could prevent serious infections in millions of hospital patients worldwide. The system, detailed in a new paper in Biosensors and Bioelectronics, changes the color of the urine so patients and carers can see easily if bacteria are starting to block the catheter. (2016-04-25)

Risk of liver cancer from hepatitis B persists even after clearing the virus
Long-term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause liver inflammation and increase the risk of liver cancer. Researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, found that resolving HBV infection was not associated with reduced rates of liver cancer. (2016-04-22)

UChicago, Evelo Biosciences sign licensing deal for microbiome-based cancer immunotherapy
Evelo Biosciences and the University of Chicago have announced that they have entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement to develop and commercialize a microbiome-based cancer immunotherapy. The cancer therapy, developed in the laboratories of Thomas Gajewski, professor of medicine and pathology at UChicago, employs select gut microbes to boost the immune system's attack on cancer cells and improve the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs. (2016-04-21)

New technology quantifies effects of prostate tumor laser ablation
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed computational tools to use magnetic resonance images to quantitatively evaluate the effects on the form and structure of the prostate following treatment. The image analysis may uncover risks of ablation and whether shape changes are associated with recurrence. (2016-04-19)

Demand for radiotherapy will rise substantially over next 10 years
The demand for radiotherapy across all European countries will increase by an average of 16 percent between 2012 and 2025, with the highest expected increase being for prostate cancer cases (24 percent), according to a new study published in Radiotherapy and Oncology. (2016-04-18)

Three years and counting on atezolizumab for stage 4 CRC patient, Rodney Bearfoot
A symposium presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 offers updated results on the ongoing phase 1b clinical trial of anti-PDL1 immunotherapy atezolizumab in advanced stage colorectal cancer patients. Treated at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, one of the earliest trial participants is Rodney Bearfoot, who remains on trial with stable disease three years after being diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer. (2016-04-18)

Modified flu virus can 'resensitize' resistant pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy
A common flu virus could be used to overcome patients' resistance to certain cancer drugs -- and improve how those drugs kill cancer cells, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). (2016-04-14)

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