Current Blind News and Events

Current Blind News and Events, Blind News Articles.
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Biomarkers in fathers' sperm linked to offspring autism
Epigenetic biomarkers in human sperm have been identified that can indicate a propensity to father children with autism spectrum disorder. In the study, researchers identified a set of genomic features, called DNA methylation regions, in sperm samples from men who were known to have autistic children. Then in a set of blind tests, they were able to use the presence of these features to determine whether other men had fathered autistic children with 90% accuracy. (2021-01-11)

A brain mechanism underlying 'vision' in the blind is revealed
Researchers observed slow spontaneous fluctuations in the brain's visual centers that preceded visual hallucinations in blind people. (2021-01-07)

An analysis of 145 journals suggests peer review itself may not explain gender discrepancies in publication rates
An analysis of 145 scholarly journals found that, among various factors that could contribute to gender bias and lesser representation of women in science, the peer review process itself is unlikely to be the primary cause of publishing inequalities. However, Flaminio Squazzoni and colleagues emphasize that the study does not account for many other factors. (2021-01-06)

Natural reward theory could provide new foundation for biology
Major trends of evolution, including the increase of complexity, command over resources, and innovativeness, have remained difficult to reconcile with Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. A new paper by Owen Gilbert (University of Texas), and published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Rethinking Ecology, suggests that there is an alternative non-random force of evolution: natural reward, which acts synergistically with natural selection and leads to the increased innovativeness, or advancement, of life with time. (2020-12-08)

Researchers say we're watching the world go blind
Three University of Michigan researchers say eye care accessibility around the globe isn't keeping up with an aging population, posing challenges for eye care professionals over the next 30 years. (2020-12-07)

Restoring a rudimentary form of vision in the blind
Restoration of vision in blind people through a brain implant is on the verge of becoming reality. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced shapes and percepts. The findings were published in Science on 3 December. (2020-12-03)

Human Brain Project-supported innovation published in Science
Human Brain Project research has helped lay the foundation for a brain implant that could one day give blind people their sight back. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that in monkeys, newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced images. The findings were published in Science on 3 December. For further development towards application in humans, the high-resolution 3D digital brain atlases of HBP's EBRAINS Research Infrastructure will become instrumental. (2020-12-03)

Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed
The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a University of Massachusetts Amherst study concludes. (2020-11-30)

Head in the game
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba find that blind soccer players rotate their heads downward when trapping an incoming pass. This work may lead to an improved understanding of the sensory changes that can manifest in visually impaired individuals. (2020-11-24)

Weather-proof chip aims to take self-driving tech, wireless communications to next level
A new device created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin can overcome challenges like bad weather to deliver more secure, reliable communications. This could aid military communications in challenging areas, improve the ability of self-driving cars to see the environment around them and speed up wireless data for potential 6G networks. (2020-11-12)

Intelligent surfaces signal better coverage
A mathematical model shows specialized reflective panels could be deployed on a large scale to enhance communication networks in urban areas. (2020-11-11)

Combo-drug treatment for Type 2 diabetes remains effective after two years
Patients whose Type 2 diabetes is not controlled with metformin can benefit long-term from a two-drug combination treatment that also reduces weight. (2020-11-02)

New test can target and capture most lethal cells in fatal brain cancer
A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults. (2020-10-15)

Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid blues and greens
Researchers from Yale-NUS College and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) find support for new hypotheses: that tarantulas' vibrant blue colours may be used to communicate between potential mates, while green colouration confers the ability to conceal among foliage. Their research also suggests that tarantulas are not as colour-blind as previously believed, and that these arachnids may be able to perceive the bright blue tones on their bodies. (2020-09-24)

New drug shown to improve bone growth in children with achondroplasia
A phase three global clinical trial led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) has shown that the drug vosoritide restores close-to-average bone growth rates of children with achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism. The study, published in The Lancet, enrolled 121 children aged five to 18. The 60 children who received vosoritide grew an average 1.57 cm more per year. Regulatory authorities are reviewing applications to license treatment. (2020-09-05)

Fungi in gut linked to higher Alzheimer's risk can be reduced through ketogenic diet
Specific fungi in the gut associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease and found in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be altered in a beneficial manner by eating a modified Mediterranean diet, researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have found. (2020-08-31)

New diagnostic criteria shine light on early dementia mimics
Experts estimate up to one third of people attending specialist memory clinics in the UK could have a condition that is commonly mistaken for early dementia. In a paper published in the journal, Brain, UK academics and clinicians have collaborated to develop a diagnostic definition of the widely recognised but poorly understood condition, Functional Cognitive Disorder (FCD). (2020-08-16)

Study finds that special filters in glasses can help the color blind see colors better
A new UC Davis Eye Center study, conducted in collaboration with France's INSERM Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute, found that special patented glasses engineered with technically advanced spectral notch filters enhance color vision for those with the most common types of red-green color vision deficiency ('anomalous trichromacy'). Notably, the ability to identify and experience expanded color was also demonstrated when color blind test subjects were not wearing the glasses. (2020-07-13)

Sensation seekers, risk-takers who experience more bitterness apt to drink IPAs
People who seek novel and powerful sensations and are more prone to taking risks -- and who perceive bitter tastes more intensely -- are more likely to prefer bitter, pale-ale-style beers and drink them more often, according to Penn State sensory researchers, who conducted a study that involved blind taste tests and personality assessments. (2020-07-09)

Research brings tech tutorials to people with visual impairments
Project allows users to interact with models of circuit boards that provide audio feedback in response to being touched. (2020-06-23)

Addressing the persistent gender gaps in some STEM pursuits
In a Policy Forum, Joseph Cimpian and colleagues identify blind spots in current educational policy designed to remedy gender inequity in STEM and argue that interventions may need to become more nuanced concerning student achievement. (2020-06-18)

An aspirin a day keeps the bowel doctor away
A regular dose of aspirin to reduce the risk of inherited bowel cancer lasts at least 10 years after stopping treatment, research has revealed. (2020-06-11)

HKUST scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
An international team led by HKUST scientists has developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment. (2020-06-10)

Restoring vision by gene therapy
Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration. (2020-06-04)

Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish
In a new study led by University of Maryland researchers, scientists discovered a gene that prevents blood flow to blind cavefish eyes during development. It is the same gene responsible for homocystinuria in humans. (2020-06-02)

Strong convictions can blind us to information that challenges them
When people are highly confident in a decision, they take in information that confirms their decision, but fail to process information which contradicts it, finds a UCL brain imaging study, published in Nature Communications. (2020-05-27)

Dynamic stimulation of the visual cortex allows blind and sighted people to 'see' shapes
In a paper publishing in the journal Cell on May 14, a team of investigators at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston describe an approach in which implanted electrodes are stimulated in a dynamic sequence, essentially 'tracing' shapes on the surface of the visual cortex that participants were able to 'see.' (2020-05-14)

Icosapent ethyl found to significantly reduce revascularizations in statin patients
Patients with high lipid levels have an increased risk for ischemic events, despite statin therapy. Findings presented as late-breaking science during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference revealed that for statin-treated patients with elevated triglycerides and increased cardiovascular risk, icosapent ethyl significantly reduced first and subsequent revascularizations compared with placebo. (2020-05-14)

Trial questions benefits of organic nitrates for bone health
A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that organic nitrates do not have clinically relevant effects on bone mineral density or bone turnover in postmenopausal women, and the medications caused significant side effects. (2020-05-06)

Anti-psychotic medication linked to adverse change in brain structure
In a first-of-its-kind study using advanced brain imaging techniques, a commonly used anti-psychotic medication was associated with potentially adverse changes in brain structure. This study was the first in humans to evaluate the effects of this type of medication on the brain using a gold-standard design: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The study could have an immediate impact on clinical practice. (2020-02-26)

Solar storms may leave gray whales blind and stranded
A new study reported in the journal Current Biology on February 24 offers some of the first evidence that gray whales might depend on a magnetic sense to find their way through the ocean. This evidence comes from the discovery that whales are more likely to strand themselves on days when solar storms disrupt Earth's magnetic field. (2020-02-24)

Study investigates rates of adverse events for common rheumatoid arthritis drug
Investigators have been able to far more accurately determine rates of adverse events for people taking methotrexate, finding small-to-moderate elevations in risks for skin cancer, gastrointestinal, infectious, lung, and blood adverse events. (2020-02-17)

New gene therapy method improves vision in mice with congenital blindness
Mice born blind have shown significant improvement in vision after undergoing a new gene therapy developed by a team of Japanese scientists. (2020-02-06)

New research shows sustainability can be a selling point for new ingredients
The first UK consumer study on the use of Bambara Groundnut as an ingredient in products has shown that sharing information on its sustainable features increased consumers' positive emotional connection to food. (2020-01-30)

New glaucoma test to help prevent blindness
Researchers have identified 107 genes that increase a person's risk of developing the eye disease glaucoma, and now developed a genetic test to detect those at risk of going blind from it. The research, led by QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute and Flinders University in Australia, has been published today in the international Nature Genetics journal. (2020-01-21)

Math that feels good
Mathematics and science Braille textbooks are expensive and require an enormous effort to produce -- until now. A team of researchers has developed a method for easily creating textbooks in Braille, with an initial focus on math textbooks. The new process is made possible by a new authoring system which serves as a 'universal translator' for textbook formats. Based on this new method, the production of Braille textbooks will become easy, inexpensive, and widespread. (2020-01-16)

Chemists glimpse the fleeting 'transition state' of a reaction
Chemists at MIT, Argonne National Laboratory, and several other institutions have devised a technique that allows them to determine the structure of the transition state of a reaction by observing the products that result from the reaction. (2019-12-16)

Methotrexate reduces joint damage progression over placebo in erosive hand OA
According to new research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, methotrexate did not demonstrate superior efficacy over placebo for pain relief and function evolution at three and 12 months in patients with erosive hand osteoarthritis, but did significantly reduce the progression of joint damage over placebo and seems to facilitate bone remodeling in these patients. (2019-11-09)

Stanford increasing access to 3D modeling through touch-based display
Stanford researchers designed a tactile display that aims to make 3D printing and computer-aided design accessible to people who are blind and visually impaired. (2019-10-29)

Diversity may be key to reducing errors in quantum computing
In quantum computing, as in team building, a little diversity can help get the job done better, computer scientists have discovered. (2019-10-15)

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