Current Block Access News and Events

Current Block Access News and Events, Block Access News Articles.
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Tricking the novel coronavirus with a fake "handshake"
Fool the novel coronavirus once and it can't cause infection of cells, new research suggests. Scientists have developed protein fragments, called peptides, that bind to the virus's Spike protein, effectively tricking SARS-CoV-2 into ''shaking hands'' with a replica rather than with the receptor that lets the virus into a cell. (2021-02-22)

A peptide that inhibits virus transmission among ferrets may point to a promising treatment
An engineered peptide given to ferrets two days before they were co-housed with SARS-CoV-2-infected animals prevented virus transmission to the treated ferrets, a new study shows. (2021-02-17)

Targeting Nsp1 protein could be a pathway for COVID-19 therapy
A study that identifies how a coronavirus protein called Nsp1 blocks the activity of genes that promote viral replication provides hope for new COVID-19 treatments. (2021-02-16)

Tailor-made drugs to treat epilepsy or cardiovascular diseases
In order for a drug to be effective at the right places in the body, it helps if scientists can predict as accurately as possible how the molecules of that drug will interact with human cells. In a joint research project, scientists from Leipzig University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai have succeeded in elucidating such a structure, namely that of the neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 with one of its ligands. (2021-02-10)

New drug target for Ebola, Marburg viruses
Researchers have identified a previously unknown site on the filovirus glycoprotein to which small drug molecules can bind and prevent infection -- blocking both sites may be a more effective treatment while reducing the risk of side effects. (2021-02-08)

A full-scale prototype for muon tomography
In this article of EPJ Plus, researchers build on previous studies into detection technologies and reconstruction algorithms for muon tomography, to develop a full-scale muon tomograph prototype. (2021-02-01)

Double delight: New synthetic transmembrane ion channel can be activated in two ways
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and University of Tokyo, Japan, have, for the first time, synthesized a novel artificial transmembrane ion channel--modelled on a naturally found transmembrane channel involved in neuron signaling--that responds to both chemical and electrical stimuli. Given its overall properties, this artificial channel opens doors to novel fundamental research into cellular transport and signaling, new possibilities in drug development, and the potential for new types of biosensors. (2021-02-01)

New weapon for inflammation
Flinders University researchers have discovered a new anti-inflammatory role for well-known blood clot protein fibrinogen, which could support targeted new treatments for kidney, heart and other common diseases. The study in Redox Biology describes how fibrinogen can be protective against hypochlorite - a chemical generated by the body during inflammation - and so act as a kind of antioxidant in blood plasma. (2021-01-31)

Building a corn cob--cell by cell, gene by gene
CSHL scientists analyzed where and when thousands of genes are activated in baby corn. This allowed them to build an anatomical map of important developmental genes that can be manipulated to improve crop yield and resilience. (2021-01-26)

Cargo delivery by polymers
Degradable, bio-based polymers offer options for chemical recycling, and they can be a tool to store and release useful molecules. Scientists have developed a class of sugar-based polymers that are degradable through acid hydrolysis. The researchers also integrated ''cargo'' molecules in the polymer, which are designed to split off after polymer degradation. Degradable, cargo-bearing polymers are important for medical and sensor applications, says the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-01-22)

Who's writing open access articles?
Open access (OA) democratizes access to research literature, but OA authors are more likely to be males in STEM fields at wealthier institutions. (2021-01-19)

Scientists make sustainable polymer from sugars in wood
Scientists from the University of Bath have made a sustainable polymer using the second most abundant sugar in nature, xylose. (2021-01-11)

Disposable surgical masks best for being heard clearly when speaking, study finds
Researcher Ryan Corey recently heard from a friend who teaches at a school where some of the students have hearing loss. The friend wanted to know if he had any ideas to help her communicate with these students while wearing a mask to slow the spread of COVID-19. Corey, who also has hearing loss, did not know what to tell her. So, he headed to the Illinois Augmented Listening Laboratory to look for solutions. (2020-12-23)

Hinder handing the message -- stopping tumors from creating new blood vessels
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that vasohibin-1 (VASH1), a protein known to prevent the formation of new blood vessels, acts by changing the conditions of microtubules which bring blocking the certain signal from outside through encumbering transport of its message to the inner of cell. The unique function of this protein can inhibit tumor cells from spreading throughout the body, making it a notable finding for cancer therapeutic research. (2020-12-14)

'Boss' genes could save human hearts - and the reef
UQ researchers have revealed rare decision-making genes in cells, which control how cells develop and respond to stress caused by disease or their environment. Researchers hope that in the future, they may be able to block a cell's bad decisions to prevent disease. (2020-12-13)

New insights about age-related macular degeneration could spur better treatments
Experiments in a mouse model have uncovered mechanisms involved in abnormal blood vessel formation in ''wet'' age-related macular degeneration. Certain inflammatory pathways and proteins may be attractive therapeutic targets for the disease. (2020-12-11)

New cost-effective technique facilitates study of non-bacterial plant microbiomes
Thanks to a new technique developed by plant pathologists in Connecticut, scientists now have access to an affordable and effective tool to facilitate the study of the entire non-bacterial microbiomes of any plant species. (2020-12-08)

Patients with kidney disease may delay AVF creation
Many patients start hemodialysis with temporary vascular access despite regular kidney care and pre-dialysis education. Delay is often related to patient choice but research on patients' perspectives is limited. In this study, researchers surveyed pre-dialysis patients and their family members about their perceptions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their intentions to undergo access creation. They also report on a new survey instrument to measure attitudes towards hemodialysis preparation. (2020-12-03)

Researchers find 'missing link'
Otago researchers have found the ''missing link between stress and infertility''. (2020-12-03)

Potential cholera vaccine target discovered
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed antibodies recovered from humans who survived cholera. Experiments showed that the antibodies block V. cholerae bacteria's motility. (2020-11-17)

'Extremely aggressive' internet censorship spreads in the world's democracies
The largest collection of public internet censorship data ever compiled shows that even citizens of what are considered the world's freest countries aren't safe from internet censorship. (2020-11-17)

Why does COVID-19 seem to spare children?
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and their colleagues have determined a key factor as to why COVID-19 appears to infect and sicken adults and older people preferentially while seeming to spare younger children. (2020-11-13)

Yale team finds way to protect genetic privacy in research
In a new report, a team of Yale scientists has developed a way to protect people's private genetic information while preserving the benefits of a free exchange of functional genomics data between researchers. (2020-11-12)

New discovery may change how dexamethasone is prescribed for some COVID-19 patients
New insights into the way the body distributes dexamethasone could mean that patients with high blood sugar may see diminished effects. (2020-11-09)

When malaria parasites trick liver cells to let themselves in
A new study led by Maria Manuel Mota, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, now shows that malaria parasites secrete the protein EXP2 that is required for their entry into hepatocytes. These findings, published today in the scientific journal Nature Communications, open a new avenue for prophylactic anti-malarial strategies, since blocking or decreasing the infection of the liver can prevent the disease. (2020-11-06)

Virus that causes COVID-19 puts a plug in cellular defenses
One of the novel coronavirus' most insidious tricks is that it can block the ability of cells to produce protective proteins without hindering its own ability to replicate. A new Yale study reveals how it does it. (2020-11-05)

Dog training methods help JHU teach robots to learn new tricks
With a training technique commonly used to teach dogs to sit and stay, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists showed a robot how to teach itself several new tricks, including stacking blocks. With the method, the robot, named Spot, was able to learn in days what typically takes a month. (2020-10-26)

How genetic variation gives rise to differences in mathematical ability
DNA variation in a gene called ROBO1 is associated with early anatomical differences in a brain region that plays a key role in quantity representation, potentially explaining how genetic variability might shape mathematical performance in children, according to a study published October 22nd in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Michael Skeide of the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, and colleagues. (2020-10-22)

Calcium bursts kill drug-resistant tumor cells
Multidrug resistance (MDR) -- a process in which tumors become resistant to multiple medicines -- is the main cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. Tumor cells often acquire MDR by boosting their production of proteins that pump drugs out of the cell, rendering the chemotherapies ineffective. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed nanoparticles that release bursts of calcium inside tumor cells, inhibiting drug pumps and reversing MDR. (2020-10-16)

Justice for all: How race and American identity may affect politics
New Penn State research examined whether feeling like you belong in America -- or not -- affected how members of different races and ethnicities participated in politics. (2020-10-16)

Novel software assesses phonologial awareness
Understanding sounds in language is a critical building block for child literacy, yet this skill is often overlooked. Researchers from Michigan State University have developed a new software tool to assess children's phonological awareness -- or, how they process the sound structure of words. (2020-10-14)

New drug candidate found for hand, foot and mouth disease
Duke researchers have identified a potential drug candidate against enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. The compound of interest is a small molecule that binds to RNA, the virus's genetic material, and changes its 3-D shape in a way that stops the virus from multiplying without harming its human host. It's an antiviral strategy that could be used on other hard-to-treat diseases. (2020-09-22)

Nanoparticle SARS-CoV-2 model may speed drug discovery for COVID-19
Scientists have developed a new tool that mimics how the virus that causes COVID-19 infects a cell, potentially speeding the search for treatments against the disease. The tool is a fluorescent nanoparticle probe that uses the spike protein on the virus surface to bind to cells and trigger the process that pulls the virus into cells. The probe could be used to rapidly gauge how drugs and compounds might block the virus from infecting cells. (2020-09-21)

Rural counties with access to obstetrics have healthier infant birth outcomes
This study does not prove a causal link between access to obstetrical care and infant health outcomes, but it does suggest that obstetrical access may play a role in these disparities. These findings have broader implications for the more than half of all rural counties in the United States that do not have access to hospital-based obstetrical care. (2020-09-15)

Patient access to after-hours primary care could prevent some less urgent ER visits
Patients who receive in-home nursing care have lower emergency room utilization if they have access to after-hours primary care. Previous research found that home nursing patients in Ontario, Canada, have an increased risk of visiting the ER after normal clinic hours on the same day they receive a home nursing visit. These ER visits may be linked to the visiting nurse identifying a health issue they are unable to appropriately address during the visit. (2020-09-15)

New immunotherapy to beat cancer
Sophie Lucas (University of Louvain de Duve Institute) and her team succeeded in neutralising a molecule that blocks the immune system against cancer. UCLouvain scientists discovered that this new immunotherapy increases the action of another well-known but not always effective immunotherapy, and that it makes tumour regression possible. This very promising discovery in the fight against cancer is published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-11)

Small proteins against SARS-CoV-2 neutralize infection in cell culture
Using innovative computer-based approaches, researchers have developed protein inhibitors that block the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 virus and human cell receptor ACE2. (2020-09-09)

Card-based system, designed to monitor asymptomatic persons, helps limit COVID-19 spread
In this research article, for the first time, the researchers have introduced a quantitative index; asymptomatic growth, to indicate whether COVID-19 community spread is under control and if economic activities can be resumed. (2020-09-07)

Making more of methane
Looking closely at the chemical process that transforms methane into useful products could help unveil more efficient ways to use natural gas. (2020-09-02)

How antibiotics interact
Understanding bottleneck effects in the translation of bacterial proteins can lead to a more effective combination of antibiotics / study in 'Nature Communications' (2020-08-31)

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