Current Blood Cells News and Events | Page 25

Current Blood Cells News and Events, Blood Cells News Articles.
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SUTD researchers develop a hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and delivery
Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) hydrogel has great potential as a cell-encapsulation delivery carrier for sustained release of paracrine factors and for tissue regeneration, with unique versatility for injection, scaffolding, and 3D bioprinting. (2019-03-25)

MD Anderson study may explain why immunotherapy not effective for some patients with metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer
White blood cells known as B cells have been shown to be effective for predicting which cancer patients will respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Study results will be presented April 2 at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019 in Atlanta. (2019-03-25)

Squishing blood stem cells could facilitate harvest for transplants
How deformable cells are, and thus how stiff or squishy they are, plays an important role in retaining blood-forming stem cells in their marrow niches and thus preserving their long-term repopulation capabilities. (2019-03-22)

Antibodies stabilize plaque in arteries
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found that type IgG antibodies play an unexpected role in atherosclerosis. A study on mice shows that the antibodies stabilize the plaque that accumulates on the artery walls, which reduces the risk of it rupturing and causing a blood clot. It is hoped that the results, which are published in the journal Circulation, will eventually lead to improved therapies. (2019-03-21)

Study gives new perspective on production of blood cells and immune cells
A new study provides a thorough accounting of blood cell production from hematopoietic stem cells. The results are important for understanding disorders such as anemia, diseases of the immune system, and blood cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas. (2019-03-21)

How 'sleeper cell' cancer stem cells are maintained in chronic myelogenous leukemia
Even when chronic myelogenous leukemia is in remission, 'sleeper cell,' quiescent leukemic stem cells are maintained in microenvironments in the bone marrow. This maintenance is poorly understood. Researchers now describe how niche-specific expression of a particular chemokine by a particular type of bone marrow cell controls quiescence of these treatment-resistant leukemic stem cells. The chemokine is CXCL12, and the particular bone marrow cells expressing it are mesenchymal stromal cells. (2019-03-21)

Research paves way for new source for leukemia drug
Chemistry researchers have patented a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them. (2019-03-20)

Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining
Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. According to a new study published in Nature Immunology, infections can have long-lasting effects on a population of meningeal immune cells, replacing them with cells from outside the meninges that then change and become less likely to recognize and ward off future attacks. (2019-03-18)

Russian scientists have determined indicators of stress development in the human body
In today's life, we often encounter situations when the organism's functions are overstrained, and the action of extreme factors causes the development of a stress response. There are three stages in the development of the organism's stress reaction: 1 - the stage of activation, 2 - the stage of resistance, 3 - the stage of exhaustion. (2019-03-15)

New proof that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered autoreactive cells in persons suffering from narcolepsy. This is a new, important proof that the sleep disorder is an autoimmune disease. This knowledge may lead to better treatment of the chronic condition, the researchers behind the new discovery believe. (2019-03-15)

Drug could alleviate side effects of chemo for breast cancer patients
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have demonstrated a method of forecasting which breast cancer patients will suffer heart problems from a commonly used chemotherapy drug. (2019-03-14)

Using 3D models to reduce side effects of radiotherapy
The debilitating side effects of radiotherapy could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a breakthrough by University of South Australia (UniSA) and Harvard University researchers. (2019-03-14)

A peek into lymph nodes
The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to the spread of cancer from one organ to another, which can happen either through the blood or the lymphatic system. However, it can be tricky to detect this early enough. Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new method that would allow doctors to detect cancers in the lymph nodes while they are still small, before they travel to other parts of the body. This can greatly increase the chances of a successful treatment. (2019-03-14)

Noninvasive ultrasound stimulation of spleen could lead to new treatments for inflammatory arthritis
Researchers at the University of Minnesota, in collaboration with researchers at Medtronic, have shown that noninvasive daily ultrasound stimulation of the spleen in mice with inflammatory arthritis resulted in significantly less joint swelling compared to arthritic mice that were not treated. The research is a first step to developing new treatment options for more than a million people in the United States who currently suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. (2019-03-14)

Cell therapy could replace need for kidney transplants
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists are working on a promising approach for treatment of chronic kidney disease - regeneration of damaged tissues using therapeutic cells. (2019-03-14)

Guardians of the synapse: Scientists identify a new role for nerve-supporting cells
Salk researchers have found, for the first time, that a blood-clotting protein can, unexpectedly, degrade nerves--and how nerve-supporting glial cells, including Schwann cells, provide protection. The findings, published March 14, 2019, in the journal PLOS Genetics, show that Schwann cells protect nerves by blocking this blood-clotting protein as well as other potentially destructive enzymes released by muscle cells. The work could have implications for diseases as diverse as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia. (2019-03-14)

Hematopoietic stem cells: Making blood thicker than water
An Osaka University-led team revealed that Ragnase-1 is a key regulator of the self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockout of this gene in mice resulted in aberrant blood cell composition and hematopoiesis, and caused health-related outcomes such as low hemoglobin, enlarged spleen, and early death. This insight into blood cell homeostasis and differentiation could lead to treatments for diseases such as leukemia in which these regulatory processes go awry. (2019-03-13)

How the heart sends an SOS signal to bone marrow cells after a heart attack
Exosomes are key to the SOS signal that the heart muscle sends out after a heart attack. Exosomes in the bloodstream carry greatly increased amounts of heart-specific microRNAs -- as seen in both mice and humans. These exosomes preferentially go to progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Inside those cells, the microRNAs turn off a specific gene that allows the progenitor cells to leave the bone marrow and travel to the heart to attempt repairs. (2019-03-13)

Found: the missing ingredient to grow blood vessels
Researchers have discovered an ingredient vital for proper blood vessel formation that explains why numerous promising treatments have failed. The discovery offers important direction for efforts to better treat conditions ranging from diabetes to heart attacks and strokes. (2019-03-13)

Study: Free fatty acids appear to rewire cells to promote obesity-related breast cancer
Free fatty acids in the blood are linked with higher rates of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer in obese postmenopausal women, according to a new study led by food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan at the University of Illinois. (2019-03-13)

Genetically encoded sensor isolates hidden leukemic stem cells
Tel Aviv University researchers have devised a novel biosensor that can isolate and target leukemic stem cells. It can provide a prototype for precision oncology efforts to target patient-specific cells to fight the deadly disease. (2019-03-12)

Starving leukemia cells by targeting amino acids
Eliminating ASCT2 selectively stops the growth of leukemia cells, while having limited effects on healthy blood cells and hematopoetic (blood-forming) stem cells. (2019-03-12)

Speedy 'slingshot' cell movement observed for the first time
By slingshotting themselves forward, human cells can travel more than five times faster than previously documented. (2019-03-12)

Vitamin B3 analogue boosts production of blood cells
Scientists from EPFL and the UNIL/Ludwig Cancer Research have found that supplementing diet with nicotinamide riboside, an analogue of vitamin B3, boosts the production of blood cells by improving the function of their stem cells. This can help overcome problems in stem cell-based therapies that treat leukemia and aggressive lymphomas. (2019-03-07)

Hypertension-related changes may occur earlier in young women with family history
New research suggests that young women with a family history of high blood pressure (hypertension) have decreased baroreflex function, which may increase their risk for hypertension later in life. The article, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology (JNP), was chosen as an APSselect article for March. (2019-03-06)

Better regulation of the immune system may minimize preeclampsia symptoms
Boosting the body's levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4)--an immune system protein that controls inflammation--may help manage the pregnancy complication preeclampsia, according to a new rodent study. The research, published in the American Journal of Physiology--Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for March. (2019-03-06)

Binding with consequences
Researchers from Freiburg and Ulm discover mechanism through which bacteria attack white blood cells. (2019-03-06)

Key genetic component may be linked to more aggressive cases of inflammatory bowel disease
A comprehensive analysis involving 14 different groups of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and 1,800 intestinal biopsies has pinpointed a key genetic component linked to more aggressive cases of the condition. (2019-03-06)

Ultrasound for thrombosis prevention
Researchers established real-time ultrasonic monitoring of the blood's aggregate state using the in vitro blood flow model. Based on collected data, computer automatically injected a thrombolytic drug if needed. As a result, the system was able to quickly and completely dissolve the forming blood clots. The team believes that their work will help open new prospects for the creation of wearable devices for timely medical assistance to patients with a high risk of thrombosis. (2019-03-06)

High-fat diet causes thickening of arteries down to the cellular level
Researchers at the University of Illinois show that the membranes of cells surrounding arteries get stiffer and thicker in response to a high fat diet, due to both LDLs and oxidized LDLs. (2019-03-01)

A highly sensitive new blood test can detect rare cancer proteins
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University developed a new blood test that can identify proteins-of-interest down to the sub-femtomolar range with minimal errors. (2019-03-01)

Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level
Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. They found that sugar molecules play a key role in cellular communication, serving as the 'channels' that cells and proteins use to talk to one another. This work also provides researchers with a new tool to study other living systems in incredible detail, enabling future breakthroughs in fields from materials science to nanomedicine. (2019-03-01)

Turning them on, turning them off -- how to control stem cells
Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells. (2019-02-28)

Atlas of acute myeloid leukemia cell types may lead to improved, targeted therapies
A research team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has assembled a detailed atlas of bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia, an aggressive blood cancer that usually leads to death within five years of diagnosis. (2019-02-28)

New mechanism of bone growth discovered
In a paper published in Nature, researchers at Karolinska Institutet report that bone growth in mice takes place in accordance with the same principles as when new cells are constantly produced in blood, skin and other tissue. This contradicts the previous understanding that bone growth depends on a finite number of gradually consumed progenitor cells. If the findings apply to humans, they could make an important contribution to the treatment of children with growth disorders. (2019-02-27)

Colon cancer growth reduced by exercise
Exercise may play a role in reducing the growth of colon cancer cells according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. The study found that after a short session of high intensity interval training (HIIT), growth of colon cancer cells was reduced, and this also increased indicators of inflammation. (2019-02-27)

Inhibiting cancer-causing protein could prevent scleroderma fibrosis
Examining the autoimmune disease at the molecular level led researchers to a specific molecule that could be contributing to the disease progression in patients. (2019-02-26)

Better together: Mitochondrial fusion supports cell division
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that when cells divide rapidly, their mitochondria are fused together. In this configuration, the cell is able to more efficiently use oxygen for energy. This work illuminates the inner workings of dividing cells and shows how mitochondria combine to help cells to multiply in unexpected ways. (2019-02-26)

New targets for ischemic drugs found
Russian scientists investigated the role of opioid receptors in protecting the heart from coronary disease: the lack of its blood supply. These receptors are mainly responsible for pain regulation. It turned out that they significantly affect the mechanism of cardioprotection. The results of the work can help to develop new drugs for ischemia. The study was published in Physiological Research. (2019-02-25)

Cool adaptations to the cold
Icefish live in an environment that should be deadly for them. Scientists have now investigated how they still manage to exist there and what evolutionary adaptations they have had to undergo in order to do so. (2019-02-25)

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