Current Blood Sugar News and Events

Current Blood Sugar News and Events, Blood Sugar News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Give the heart a ketone? It may be beneficial
There is growing evidence that ketone bodies may be beneficial to heart disease patients regardless of the method of delivery used to increase ketone delivery to the heart. A Journal of the American College of Cardiology review paper examines emerging evidence regarding ketone bodies' effects on the heart and the potential for ketone therapy as a cardiovascular intervention in heart disease patients. (2021-02-23)

Artificial pancreas system upgraded with AI algorithm
POSTECH professor Sung-Min Park's research team is developing a fully automated glucose management system that goes beyond the limits. (2021-02-22)

Swimming upstream on sound waves
ETH researchers are among the first scientists to have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionising the field of medicine. (2021-02-19)

Sweet marine particles resist hungry bacteria
Rather sweet than salty: In the ocean microalgae produce a lot of sugar during algae blooms. These enormous quantities of algal biomass are normally recycled rapidly by marine bacteria, degradation process that is an important part of the global carbon cycle. Especially sugars have been considered as easily digestible and therefore poor candidates for natural carbon sequestration. Now scientists from Bremen revealed: There exists a sugar in algae that resists rapid microbial degradation and stores carbon during spring blooms. (2021-02-19)

New data on COVID-19 patients with diabetes show that one in five die within
Updated results from the CORONADO study, analysing the outcomes of patients with diabetes admitted to hospital with COVID-19, shows that one in five patients die within 28 days while around half are discharged. The study is published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]). (2021-02-17)

New skin patch brings us closer to wearable, all-in-one health monitor
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer's levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same time. (2021-02-15)

To improve immunotherapy, researchers look to shift immune cells' access to sugar
New research from Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists suggests that a way to improve immunotherapy is by altering immune cells' access to sugar. (2021-02-15)

Biosensors monitor plant well-being in real time
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed biosensors that make it possible to monitor sugar levels in real time deep in the plant tissues - something that has previously been impossible. The information from the sensors may help agriculture to adapt production as the world faces climate change. The results have been published in the scientific journal iScience. (2021-02-11)

A plant's nutrient-sensing abilities can modulate its response to environmental stress
Understanding how plants respond to stressful environmental conditions is crucial to developing effective strategies for protecting important agricultural crops from a changing climate. New research led by Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang, Shouling, Xu, and Yang Bi reveals an important process by which plants switch between amplified and dampened stress responses. (2021-02-11)

Once bitten, twice shy: the neurology of why one bad curry could put us off for life
A negative experience with food usually leaves us unable to stomach the thought of eating that particular dish again. Using sugar-loving snails as models, researchers at the University of Sussex believe these bad experiences could be causing a switch in our brains, which impacts our future eating habits. (2021-02-11)

Prediabetes may be linked to worse brain health
For the study, published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers analysed data from the UK Biobank of 500,000 people aged 58 years on average, and found that people with higher than normal blood sugar levels were 42% more likely to experience cognitive decline over an average of four years, and were 54% more likely to develop vascular dementia over an average of eight years (although absolute rates of both cognitive decline and dementia were low). (2021-02-11)

'Gamechanger' drug for treating obesity cuts body weight by 20%
One third (35%) of people who took a new drug for treating obesity lost more than one-fifth of their total body weight, according to a major global study involving UCL researchers. (2021-02-10)

Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may increase Alzheimer's disease risk
Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in older men. This is suggested by a new study from researchers at Uppsala University, now published in the journal Hypertension. (2021-02-08)

"Prediabetes" diagnosis less useful in older patients
Older adults who are classified as having ''prediabetes'' due to moderately elevated measures of blood sugar usually don't go on to develop full-blown diabetes. (2021-02-08)

Cancer leading cause of death among people with diabetes
Cancer is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes in England. (2021-02-04)

New guidance on how cardiac patients with diabetes can exercise more safely
Cardiac patients who also have diabetes will be able to do their rehabilitation exercises more safely, thanks to the world's first guidance on the subject, which has been published by international experts including a Swansea University academic. The guidance will be a crucial resource for healthcare professionals, so they can help the growing number of cardiac rehabilitation patients who also have diabetes. (2021-02-04)

Study finds childhood diet has lifelong impact
Eating too much fat and sugar as a child can alter your microbiome for life, even if you later learn to eat healthier, a new UC Riverside study in mice suggests. (2021-02-03)

Extreme blood sugar swings in people with type 2 diabetes may increase heart disease risk
In patients with type 2 diabetes, big swings in blood sugar levels between doctors' visits are associated with an increased risk of heart disease. (2021-02-03)

Insulin can be stored out of refrigeration in hot settings!
Patients with diabetes must keep a supply of insulin which must respect the cold chain. However not every household has a refrigerator. This forces people living with diabetes to go to hospital on a daily basis. MSF and UNIGE test insulin storage at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 37°C. The findings demonstrate that the stability of insulin stored under these conditions is the same as that of cold-stored insulin, with no impact on efficacy. (2021-02-03)

Social interactions after isolation may counteract cravings
Social interaction may help reverse food and cigarette cravings triggered by being in social isolation, a UNSW study in rats has found. The study, published in Scientific Reports, used an animal model of drug addiction to show that a return to social interaction gives the same result as living in a rich, stimulating environment in reducing cravings for both sugar and nicotine rewards. (2021-02-02)

Diabetes during pregnancy may increase risk of heart disease
An analysis of more than 1,000 women found that a history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) doubled the risk of heart artery calcification - a marker of increased risk for heart disease - many years after pregnancy, at the average age of 48, even if blood sugar returned to healthy levels. (2021-02-01)

NUS scientists discover a new pathway essential for blood formation
Scientists from the National University of Singapore have discovered how a protein called Tip60 plays a vital role in the renewal of blood cells in the body. Without it, the stem cells that make new blood suffer catastrophic damage. This discovery could lead to better treatments for life-threatening blood-related diseases like leukemia. (2021-01-28)

Social media study reveals diabetics' fear of disrupted insulin supplies because of Brexit
Diabetics living in the UK worry about disruption to insulin supplies as a result of Brexit, new research shows. (2021-01-27)

Scientists discover a new promising target for diabetes treatment
Researchers have discovered a novel and druggable insulin inhibitory receptor, named inceptor. The blocking of inceptor function leads to an increased sensitisation of the insulin signaling pathway in pancreatic beta cells. This might allow protection and regeneration of beta cells for diabetes remission. (2021-01-27)

New study: Malaria tricks the brain's defence system
Malaria is one of the most common causes of death in children in Africa. When the parasite builds up in the blood vessels of the brain, it develops into one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, cerebral malaria. Though it wasn't certain if the parasite was able to penetrate the brain tissue, now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found parasites can do that and have mapped the mechanism they utilise. (2021-01-26)

Drug to treat rare genetic disease may help control transmission of African Trypanosomiasis
African trypanosomiasis (also known as sleeping sickness) is a disease transmitted by tsetse flies and is fatal to humans and other animals; however, there is currently no vaccine, this disease is mainly controlled by reducing insect populations and patient treatment. A study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Alvaro Acosta-Serrano at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and an international team of researchers suggests that the approved drug nitisinone could be repurposed to kill tsetse flies without harming important pollinator insects. (2021-01-26)

Fighting cancer from a chair
Cisplatin has been used to treat cancer since the 1970s. Since then, many other platinum-containing cytostatic drugs have been developed, such as triplatinNC, a highly charged complex that contains three ligand-bridged platinum atoms. Unlike cisplatin, this drug also directly inhibits metastasis. The reason for this seems to be modulation of the geometry of a sugar component of heparan sulfate, an important component of the extracellular matrix, reports a research team in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-01-25)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

The regulatory network of sugar and organic acid in watermelon fruit is revealed
The innovation project watermelon and melon cultivation and physiology team of Zhengzhou Fruit Research Institute has made new progress in the metabolism regulation of sugar and organic acid in watermelon fruit. (2021-01-14)

Stretching more effective than walking to lower high blood pressure: USask study
A new University of Saskatchewan (USask) study has found that stretching is superior to brisk walking for reducing blood pressure in people with high blood pressure or who are at risk of developing elevated blood pressure levels. (2021-01-14)

ADA lowers target HbA1C levels for children with type-1 diabetes
In early 2020, upon recommendation by leading endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association lowered the target hemoglobin A1C guidelines for children with type 1 diabetes. Their goal in recommending stricter glucose control was to ensure children with type 1 diabetes have better immediate and long-term health outcomes with fewer health complications and reduced mortality rates. In this ''Perspective'' article they discuss the evidence and rationale behind this new recommendation. (2021-01-14)

High doses of saccharin don't lead to diabetes in healthy adults, study finds
For those trying to live a healthy lifestyle, the choice between sugar and artificial sweeteners such as saccharin can be confusing. A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found the sugar substitute saccharin doesn't lead to the development of diabetes in healthy adults as previous studies have suggested. (2021-01-12)

Study reveals strong links between gut microbes, diet and metabolic health
The largest and most detailed study of its kind has uncovered strong links between a person's diet, the microbes in their gut (microbiome) and their health. This interrelationship appears to associate with an individual's risk of some serious conditions, including diabetes and heart disease. The study shows that gut microbe composition is highly individualized, and these findings could be used to provide personal dietary advice for better health. (2021-01-11)

Landmark study reveals link between gut microbes, diet and illnesses
Diets rich in healthy and plant-based foods encourages the presence of gut microbes that are linked to a lower risk of common illnesses including heart disease, research has found. (2021-01-11)

Pillar-like molecules as biosensors for metabolites
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that a molecule known as pillar[6]arene can form a host-guest compound with a cancer-associated metabolite. The phenomenon can be used to efficiently detect the metabolite in crude biological samples, which is important for preventing and treating metabolic syndrome and associated pathologies. (2021-01-11)

Scientists make sustainable polymer from sugars in wood
Scientists from the University of Bath have made a sustainable polymer using the second most abundant sugar in nature, xylose. (2021-01-11)

Research finds increased first-trimester exercise may reduce gestational diabetes risk
Pregnant women who exercise more during the first trimester of pregnancy may have a lower risk of developing gestational diabetes, according to a new study led by Samantha Ehrlich, an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The analysis found that lower risk was associated with at least 38 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each day--more than current recommendations of at least 30 minutes a day five days a week. (2021-01-11)

Possible explanation for more efficient maize growth
Plant researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have investigated the transport of compounds in maize. They focused on the mechanism used to transport the products of photosynthesis for further distribution in the plant through its phloem loading pathways. In the current edition of the journal ''The Plant Cell'', they describe how this mechanism has potentially created a special evolutionary advantage for maize. (2021-01-08)

IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia. (2021-01-07)

Hydroxychloroquine blood levels predict clotting risk in patients with lupus
A new study in Arthritis & Rheumatology shows that monitoring patients' blood levels of hydroxychloroquine can predict their clotting risk. (2021-01-06)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.