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Pairing prediction and production in AI-informed robotic flow synthesis
Combining machine learning and robotic precision, researchers present an integrated strategy for computer-augmented chemical synthesis, one that successfully yielded 15 different medicinally related small molecules, they say. (2019-08-08)
Researchers discover why intense light can protect cardiovascular health
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that intense light amplifies a specific gene that bolsters blood vessels and offers protection against heart attacks. (2019-08-08)
Using recent gene flow to define microbe populations
Identifying species among plants and animals has been a full-time occupation for some biologists, but the task is even more daunting for the myriad microbes that inhabit the planet. (2019-08-08)
A rocky relationship: A history of Earth's continents breaking up and getting back together
A new study of rocks that formed billions of years ago lends fresh insight into how Earth's plate tectonics, or the movement of large pieces of Earth's outer shell, evolved over the planet's 4.56-billion-year history. (2019-08-07)
Blood pressure recording over 24 hours is the best predictor of heart and vascular disease
High blood pressure is the most important treatable risk factor for diseases of the heart and the arterial system. (2019-08-06)
Blood pressure monitoring may one day be easy as taking a video selfie
Future blood pressure monitoring could become as easy as taking a video selfie. (2019-08-06)
Researchers create first-ever 'map' of global labor flow
A new study from Indiana University reveals the ebb and flow of labor -- as well as industries and skills -- across the global economy using data on 130 million job transitions among 500 workers on the world's largest professional social network, LinkedIn. (2019-08-02)
Slip layer dynamics reveal why some fluids flow faster than expected
New microscopy technique provides unprecedented insight into nanoscopic slip layers formed in flowing complex liquids. (2019-08-01)
Another trick up the immune system's sleeve: Regrowing blood vessels
Peripheral artery disease, which affects 8.5 million people in the US, can cut off blood flow to the arms and legs, sometimes forcing doctors to amputate limbs. (2019-07-31)
Postpartum transfusions on the rise, carry greater risk of adverse events
Women who receive a blood transfusion after giving birth are twice as likely to have an adverse reaction related to the procedure, such as fever, respiratory distress, or hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells), compared with non-pregnant women receiving the same care, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. (2019-07-31)
Tart cherry juice may juice up the brain
In a new study published in Food & Function , researchers at the University of Delaware found daily intake of Montmorency tart cherry juice improved memory scores among adults, ages 65 to 73 years. (2019-07-28)
Researchers develop novel imaging approach with potential to identify patients with CAD
Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have developed a novel imaging approach that has the potential to identify patients with coronary disease without administration of drugs or contrast dye and within a short 15 minute exam protocol. (2019-07-26)
Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines. (2019-07-25)
Heat flow through single molecules detected
Researchers develop ways to measure and explain heat transport through a single molecule. (2019-07-19)
Discovering how diabetes leads to vascular disease
A team of UC Davis Health scientists and physicians has identified a cellular connection between diabetes and one of its major complications -- blood vessel narrowing that increases risks of several serious health conditions, including heart disease and stroke. (2019-07-19)
Genetic differences between strains of Epstein-Barr virus can alter its activity
Researchers at the University of Sussex have identified how differences in the genetic sequence of the two main strains of the cancer-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can alter the way the virus behaves when it infects white blood cells. (2019-07-18)
Higher iron levels may boost heart health -- but also increase risk of stroke
Scientists have helped unravel the protective -- and potentially harmful -- effect of iron in the body. (2019-07-16)
Improving heat recycling with the thermodiffusion effect
In a study recently published in EPJ E, researchers find that the absorption of water vapour within industrial heat recycling devices is directly tied to a physical process known as the thermodiffusion effect. (2019-07-15)
How DNA outside cells can be targeted to prevent the spread of cancer
Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is DNA found in trace amounts in blood, which has escaped degradation by enzymes. (2019-07-11)
Most dog and cat owners not aware of pet blood donation schemes
Most dog and cat owners are not aware of pet blood donation schemes and animal blood banks, finds a survey of pet owners published in Vet Record. (2019-07-09)
Castor oil-based inhibitors to remove gas hydrate plugs in Arctic deposits
The castor-based waterborne polyurea/urethanes (CWPUUs) were synthesized on the basis of the waterborne technique. (2019-07-08)
Blood flow monitor could save lives
A tiny fibre-optic sensor has the potential to save lives in open heart surgery, and even during surgery on pre-term babies. (2019-07-08)
UH researcher reports the way sickle cells form may be key to stopping them
University of Houston chemist Vassiliy Lubchenko is reporting a new finding in Nature Communications on how sickle cells are formed, which may lead not only to stopping their formation, but to new avenues for making uniformly-sized nanoparticles for industry. (2019-07-02)
Sense of smell, pollution and neurological disease connection explored
A consensus is building that air pollution can cause neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but how fine, sooty particles cause problems in the brain is still an unanswered question. (2019-07-01)
Heart attack patients with diabetes may benefit from cholesterol-lowering injections
Regular injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes and who have had a recent heart attack. (2019-07-01)
New Geosphere study examines 2017-2018 Thomas Fire debris flows
Shortly before the beginning of the 2017-2018 winter rainy season, one of the largest fires in California (USA) history (Thomas fire) substantially increased the susceptibility of steep slopes in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties to debris flows. (2019-06-28)
Elevated first trimester blood pressure increases risk for pregnancy hypertensive disorders
Elevated blood pressure in the first trimester of pregnancy, or an increase in blood pressure between the first and second trimesters, raises the chances of a high blood pressure disorder of pregnancy, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-06-27)
NIST presents first real-world test of new smokestack emissions sensor designs
In collaboration with industry, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have completed the first real-world test of a potentially improved way to measure smokestack emissions in coal-fired power plants. (2019-06-27)
Exercise an effective protection against life-threatening cerebral haemorrhage
A Finnish study demonstrates that as little as half an hour of light exercise per week effectively protects against subarachnoid haemorrhage, the most lethal disorder of the cerebral circulation. (2019-06-25)
No cell is an island
In a new study, published on June 25, 2019, in the journal eLife, the researchers report that higher levels of doublets -- long dismissed as technical artifacts -- can be found in people with severe cases of tuberculosis or dengue fever. (2019-06-25)
Changes in blood flow tell heart cells to regenerate
Altered blood flow resulting from heart injury switches on a communication cascade that reprograms heart cells and leads to heart regeneration in zebrafish. (2019-06-25)
Hearts and stripes: A tiny fish offers clues to regenerating damaged cardiac tissue
Zebrafish, a pet shop staple, may hold the clue for how hearts can heal from damage. (2019-06-25)
Non-invasive view into the heart
The non-invasive measurement of blood flow to the heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on par with cardiac catheterization. (2019-06-24)
Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level
Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. (2019-06-24)
Certain cells secrete a substance in the brain that protects neurons, USC study finds
USC researchers have discovered a secret sauce in the brain's vascular system that preserves the neurons needed to keep dementia and other diseases at bay. (2019-06-24)
PET/CT detects cardiovascular disease risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea patients
Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting draws a strong link between severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and impaired coronary flow reserve, which is an early sign of the heart disease atherosclerosis. (2019-06-24)
The pressure difference and vortex flow of blood in the heart chambers may signal heart dysfunction
Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Teikyo University of Science, and Juntendo University have found -- in animal studies -- a close relationship between vortex flow and pressure differences in the ventricles, or lower chambers, of the heart. (2019-06-21)
'Robot blood' powers machines for lengthy tasks
Researchers at Cornell University have created a system of circulating liquid -- 'robot blood' -- within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks. (2019-06-20)
Squeezing of blood vessels may contribute to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's
Reduced blood flow to the brain associated with early Alzheimer's may be caused by the contraction of cells wrapped around blood vessels, according to a UCL-led study that opens up a new way to potentially treat the disease. (2019-06-20)
Scientists identify genes associated with biliary atresia survival
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have identified an expression pattern of 14 genes at the time of diagnosis that predicts two year, transplant-free survival in children with biliary atresia -- the most common diagnosis leading to liver transplants in children. (2019-06-19)
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