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Current Blood Pressure News and Events, Blood Pressure News Articles.
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Quantum mechanical simulations of Earth's lower mantle minerals
The theoretical mineral physics group of Ehime University led by Dr. (2020-03-02)
Are grandma, grandpa sleepy during the day? They may be at risk for diabetes, cancer, more
Older people who experience daytime sleepiness may be at risk of developing new medical conditions, including diabetes, cancer and high blood pressure, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020. (2020-03-01)
Eating a vegetarian diet rich in nuts, vegetables, soy linked to lower stroke risk
People who eat a vegetarian diet rich in nuts, vegetables and soy may have a lower risk of stroke than people who eat a diet that includes meat and fish, according to a study published in the February 26, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-02-27)
International group of scientists found new regulators of blood supply to the brain
There are approximately as many neuroglia class cells known as astrocytes in the brain as there are neurons, but the function of these cells has long remained a mystery to scientists. (2020-02-26)
Intensive blood pressure control can extend life up to 3 years
Investigators from the Brigham describe how aggressively lowering blood pressure levels can extend a person's life expectancy. (2020-02-26)
Age at menopause not linked to conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors
The age at which a woman's periods stop, and the menopause starts, doesn't seem to be linked to the development of the risk factors typically associated with cardiovascular disease, suggests research published online in the journal Heart. (2020-02-25)
Specific gut bacteria may be associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension
Researchers have found a specific bacterial profile in the gut of people with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a chronic and progressive disease that causes constriction of arteries in the lungs. (2020-02-24)
New method gives glaucoma researchers control over eye pressure
Neuroscientists have developed a new method that permits continuous regulation of eye pressure without damage, becoming the first to definitively prove pressure in the eye is sufficient to cause and explain glaucoma. (2020-02-24)
Simple blood test could help reduce heart disease deaths
Scientists at Newcastle University have revealed how a simple blood test could be used to help identify cardiovascular ageing and the risk of heart disease. (2020-02-24)
InSight detects gravity waves, devilish dust on Mars
More than a year after NASA's Mars InSight lander touched down in a pebble-filled crater on the Martian equator, the rusty red planet is now serving up its meteorological secrets: gravity waves, surface swirling ''dust devils,'' and the steady, low rumble of infrasound, Cornell and other researchers have found. (2020-02-24)
Telemonitoring plus phone counseling lowers blood pressure among black and Hispanic stroke survivors
Minority stroke survivors experience better blood pressure control when lifestyle counseling by phone from a nurse is added to home blood pressure telemonitoring. (2020-02-21)
Scientists use light to convert fatty acids into alkanes
Researchers led by Prof. WANG Feng at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have reported that photocatalytic decarboxylation is an efficient alternate pathway for converting biomass-derived fatty acids into alkanes under mild conditions of ambient temperature and pressure. (2020-02-20)
Gene tests for heart disease risk have limited benefit
Genetic tests to predict a person's risk of heart disease and heart attack have limited benefit over conventional testing. (2020-02-18)
NIH study supports new approach for treating cerebral malaria
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence that specific immune cells may play a key role in the devastating effects of cerebral malaria, a severe form of malaria that mainly affects young children. (2020-02-18)
When the best treatment for hypertension is to wait
A new study concluded that a physician's decision not to intensify hypertension treatment is often a contextually appropriate choice. (2020-02-18)
Smart contact lens sensor developed for point-of-care eye health monitoring
A research group led by Prof. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a ''smart'' contact lens that can show real-time changes in moisture and pressure by altering colors. (2020-02-18)
Antioxidant in mushrooms may relieve features of 'pregnancy hypertension'
A new study in rats suggests that the natural antioxidant L-ergothioneine could alleviate the characteristics of pre-eclampsia. (2020-02-17)
UIC researchers find unique organ-specific signature profiles for blood vessel cells
Researchers have discovered that endothelial cells have unique genetic signatures based on their location in the body. (2020-02-13)
Damaged eye vessels may indicate higher stroke risk for adults with diabetes
Damage to small blood vessels of the eye may be a marker for heightened risk of stroke in people with diabetes. (2020-02-12)
More stroke awareness, better eating habits may help reduce stroke risk for young adult African-Americans
Young African-Americans are experiencing higher rates of stroke because of health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity, yet their perception of their stroke risk is low. (2020-02-12)
Sex hormone-related protein levels may impact stroke risk in women
Women with lower blood levels of a protein that binds to and transports sex hormones like estradiol and testosterone may have a higher risk of ischemic stroke. (2020-02-12)
Blacks, Hispanics of Caribbean descent have higher stroke risk than white neighbors
Both blacks and Hispanics, mostly of Caribbean descent, were found to have a higher risk of stroke than non-Hispanic whites living in the same New York City neighborhoods. (2020-02-12)
New air-pressure sensor could improve everyday devices
A team of mechanical engineers at Binghamton University, State University of New York investigating a revolutionary kind of micro-switch has found another application for its ongoing research. (2020-02-12)
Free radicals from immune cells are direct cause of salt-sensitive hypertension
In salt-sensitive hypertension, immune cells gather in the kidneys and shoot out free radicals, heightening blood pressure and damaging this pair of vital organs, scientists report. (2020-02-11)
NIH scientists link higher maternal blood pressure to placental gene changes
Higher maternal blood pressure in pregnancy is associated with chemical modifications to placental genes, according to a study by researchers from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (2020-02-10)
Common medication may lower risk of 'broken heart' during bereavement
The increased risk of heart attack or 'a broken heart' in early bereavement could be reduced by using common medication in a novel way, according to a world-first study led by the University of Sydney and funded by Heart Research Australia. (2020-02-10)
Financial pressure makes CFOs less likely to blow the whistle
A recent study finds that corporate financial managers do a great job of detecting signs of potential fraud, but are less likely to voice these concerns externally when their company is under pressure to meet a financial target. (2020-02-10)
Quantum fluctuations sustain the record superconductor
Calculations performed by an international team of researchers from Spain, Italy, France, Germany, and Japan show that the crystal structure of the record superconducting LaH10 compound is stabilized by atomic quantum fluctuations. (2020-02-10)
Human textiles to repair blood vessels
As the leading cause of mortality worldwide, cardiovascular diseases claim over 17 million lives each year, according to World Health Organization estimates. (2020-02-10)
Pregnant women with very high blood pressure face greater heart disease risk
Women with high blood pressure in their first pregnancy have a greater risk of heart attack or cardiovascular death, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-02-06)
Fat-fighting drug discovery
Cancer-fighting compound fights obesity and diabetes. (2020-02-06)
All women should be educated after childbirth about high blood pressure
After childbirth, it is not uncommon for women to experience high blood pressure. (2020-02-06)
Growing new blood vessels could provide new treatment for recovering movement
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology highlights the link between loss of the smallest blood vessels in muscle and difficulties moving and exercising. (2020-02-06)
Engineered living-cell blood vessel provides new insights to progeria
Scientists have developed the most advanced disease model for blood vessels to date and used it to discover a unique role of the endothelium in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome. (2020-02-06)
Healthy habits still vital after starting blood pressure, cholesterol medications
Heart-healthy lifestyle habits are always recommended whether blood pressure or cholesterol medications are prescribed or not, yet many patients let healthy habits slip after starting the prescription drugs. (2020-02-05)
Short, intensive training improves children's health
Many children don't get enough exercise and as a result often have health problems such as being overweight and having high blood pressure. (2020-02-05)
Elevated fasting blood sugar in pregnancy linked to harmful outcomes for mothers, babies
Women with gestational diabetes who have elevated blood sugar levels before eating are at higher risk for complications than those whose blood sugar is only elevated after meals -- even when their diabetes is treated, according to a new study from the University of Alberta. (2020-02-03)
New device identifies high-quality blood donors
Blood banks have long known about high-quality donors - individuals whose red blood cells stay viable longer in storage and in the recipient's body. (2020-02-03)
Blood test identifies risk of disease linked to stroke and dementia
A UCLA-led study has found that levels of six proteins in the blood can be used to gauge a person's risk for cerebral small vessel disease, a brain disease that affects an estimated 11 million older adults in the U.S. (2020-02-03)
Math models add up to improved cancer immunotherapy
A merger of math and medicine may help to improve the efficacy of immunotherapies, potentially life-saving treatments that enhance the ability of the patient's own immune system to attack cancerous tumors. (2020-02-03)
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