Current Bluetooth News and Events

Current Bluetooth News and Events, Bluetooth News Articles.
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New quantum receiver the first to detect entire radio frequency spectrum
A new quantum sensor can analyze the full spectrum of radio frequency and real-world signals, unleashing new potentials for soldier communications, spectrum awareness and electronic warfare. (2021-02-04)

The application Radar COVID detects twice as many contacts as the manual tracing system
The application Radar COVID detects twice as many close contacts of people infected with the virus SARS-Cov2 as the manual tracing system. This is the conclusion of the first scientific study that was carried out to assess the application in a trial carried out last summer on the island of La Gomera in the Canary Islands (Spain). The results have been published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-31)

Wirelessly rechargeable soft brain implant controls brain cells
Researchers have invented a smartphone-controlled soft brain implant that can be recharged wirelessly from outside the body. It enables long-term neural circuit manipulation without the need for periodic disruptive surgeries to replace the battery of the implant. Scientists believe this technology can help uncover and treat psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as addiction, depression, and Parkinson's. (2021-01-26)

Broadening horizons for people with quadriplegia
An assistive technology uses magnetic skin to support freedom of movement for people with quadriplegia. (2021-01-17)

Tech makes it possible to digitally communicate through human touch
Researchers have developed the first technology capable of sending digital information, such as a photo or password, by touching a surface with your finger. (2020-12-03)

Computer vision app allows easier monitoring of diabetes
A computer vision technology developed by University of Cambridge engineers has now been developed into a free mobile phone app for regular monitoring of glucose levels in people with diabetes. (2020-11-13)

Stretchable 'skin' sensor gives robots human sensation
Cornell University researchers have created a fiber-optic sensor that combines low-cost LEDs and dyes, resulting in a stretchable ''skin'' that detects deformations such as pressure, bending and strain. This sensor could give soft robotic systems - and anyone using augmented reality technology - the ability to feel the same rich, tactile sensations that mammals depend on to navigate the natural world. (2020-11-12)

New research could help millions who suffer from 'ringing in the ears'
In the largest clinical trial of its kind, researchers show that combining sound and electrical stimulation of the tongue can significantly reduce tinnitus, commonly described as 'ringing in the ears.' They also found that therapeutic effects can be sustained for up to 12 months post-treatment. (2020-10-15)

Airdropping sensors from moths
University of Washington researchers have created a sensor system that can ride aboard a small drone or an insect, such as a moth, until it gets to its destination. (2020-10-07)

A fresh sense of possibility
A multisensory graphene-based skin can sense in extreme environments where other sensors cannot be used. (2020-09-22)

Researchers discover cyber vulnerabilities affecting bluetooth based medical devices
The Greyhound framework, named after the breed of dogs known for their hunting abilities, was designed and implemented by an SUTD-led research team to systematically sniff out security lapses in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enabled devices. (2020-09-21)

Extent of India's COVID nudge campaign revealed
The Government of India's use of nudge theory in the first three months of the pandemic helped to tackle the virus on numerous fronts, a new study suggests. (2020-09-16)

Operation Outbreak simulation teaches students how pandemics spread
In 2015, a team of specialists in modeling disease outbreaks got together with educators to create Operation Outbreak, an educational platform and simulation intended to teach high school and college students the fundamentals of responses to pandemics. The program, which is open source and freely available, includes a Bluetooth-based app that carries out contact tracing by recording transmission events between phones. The details are highlighted in a Commentary published in the journal Cell. (2020-09-03)

Novel magnetic stirrer speaks to lab equipment
A small device, called ''Smart Stirrer'', performed a function of a conventional laboratory stir bar, has an integrated microprocessor and various sensors capable of wireless and autonomous report the conversion of properties of a solution. Results are sent to a computer over Bluetooth, and any changes notify the user wirelessly. (2020-08-03)

Remote, real-time monitoring of post-operative lung transplant patients significantly decreases hospital stays
Remote, real-time monitoring of post-operative lung transplant patients significantly decreases hospital readmissions and resulted in shorter hospital stays when patients were readmitted (2020-07-27)

Ben-Gurion University researchers determine how to accurately pinpoint malicious drone operators
When tested in simulated drone paths, the model was able to predict the operator location with 78% accuracy. The next step in the project would be to repeat this experiment with data captured from real drones. (2020-07-08)

82% of Irish adults willing to download COVID-19 contact tracing app
The vast majority of Irish adults -- 82% -- are willing to download a contact tracing app to their smartphone to curb the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research carried out by a team from Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software, University of Limerick (UL) and National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway). However, respondents also expressed several privacy concerns including that the Government, tech firms or hackers might use the information gathered for other purposes after the pandemic. (2020-06-23)

Bluetooth technology, the best ally to detect COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing
A study carried out by researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and published in the IEEE Access journal concludes that Bluetooth technology is the best ally to detect possible COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing. The key is the high level of precision, higher than other technologies, such as GPS, cell phone networks and Wi-Fi. (2020-06-08)

New 5G switches bring better battery life, higher bandwidth and speeds
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Lille in France have built a new component that will more efficiently allow access to the highest 5G frequencies in a way that increases devices' battery life and speeds up how quickly we can do things like stream high-definition media. (2020-05-26)

Bluetooth-enabled device detects fermentation process over days
Electrochemical reactions include the transformation of sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide, and similar processes occur when the body breaks down food, drugs or other compounds. Monitoring these metabolic processes helps in testing, studying and combating disease, but they are difficult to study with normal equipment. In this week's Review of Scientific Instruments, researchers discuss their work with a miniaturized potentiostat, which is compatible with most 3-electrode biosensors and can transmit its measurements via Bluetooth. (2020-05-05)

New device tracks e-cigarette habits to help curtail usage
A new device that attaches to e-cigarettes can unobtrusively monitor inhalations -- yielding important information for research about when and where people vape, how deeply they inhale and how much nicotine they consume. (2020-05-04)

Electronic skin fully powered by sweat can monitor health
Electronic skin monitors body's vitals signs while being powered by sweat. (2020-04-22)

COVID-19 contact tracing apps: 8 privacy questions governments should ask
Imperial experts have posed eight privacy questions governments should consider when developing coronavirus contact tracing apps. (2020-04-02)

Sensor cube helps keep fish farming afloat
A self-powered water quality sensor could help fish farmers to monitor pollution in their ponds remotely. (2020-02-27)

The great e-scooter hack
New research out of UTSA finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions. Computer science experts at UTSA have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications. (2020-01-27)

Developed a band-aid-like sensor to detect human body conditions in real-time
DGIST announced that Professor Hyuk-Jun Kwon in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed a 'patch-based health diagnosis sensor system' that is easily attached to skin with Professor Sunkook Kim's research team at Sungkyunkwan University. This sensor is attached to skin as if attaching band-aid and collects various health information in real-time by monitoring biosignals and certain movements, drawing huge expectations for diverse applications. (2020-01-08)

Making tiny antennas for wearable electronics
When it comes to electronics, bigger usually isn't better. This is especially true for a new generation of wearable communication systems that promise to connect people, machines and other objects in a wireless 'internet of things.' To make the devices small and comfortable enough to wear, scientists need to miniaturize their components. Now, researchers in ACS Nano have made the tiniest radio-frequency antennas reported yet, with thicknesses of about 1/100 of a human hair. (2019-11-20)

Design flaw could open Bluetooth devices to hacking
Mobile apps that work with Bluetooth devices have an inherent design flaw that makes them vulnerable to hacking, new research has found. (2019-11-14)

Implantable cancer traps could provide earlier diagnosis, help monitor treatment
Invasive procedures to biopsy tissue from cancer-tainted organs could be replaced by simply taking samples from a tiny 'decoy' implanted just beneath the skin, University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated in mice. (2019-10-29)

UTSA study warns of security gaps in smart light bulbs
Smart bulbs are expected to be a popular purchase this holiday season. But could lighting your home open up your personal information to hackers? Now researchers at UTSA have conducted a review of the security holes that exist in popular smart-light brands. According to the analysis, the next prime target could be that smart bulb that shoppers buy this coming holiday season. (2019-10-23)

Researchers significantly extend Wi-Fi range for smart-home devices
A group of researchers has created a protocol that significantly extends the distance a Wi-Fi enabled device can send and receive signals. The engineering innovation requires no new hardware to enhance the signal range for 'Internet of things' devices, like a door sensor or motion detector, but can extend the distance these devices can be installed from a Wi-Fi access point by more than 60 meters, according to test results. (2019-10-23)

Wearable brain-machine interface could control a wheelchair, vehicle or computer
Combining new classes of nanomembrane electrodes with flexible electronics and a deep learning algorithm could help disabled people wirelessly control an electric wheelchair, interact with a computer or operate a small robotic vehicle without donning a bulky hair-electrode cap or contending with wires. (2019-09-19)

Unlock your smartphone with earbuds
A University at Buffalo-led research team is developing EarEcho, a biometric tool that uses modified wireless earbuds to authenticate smartphone users via the unique geometry of their ear canal. A prototype of the system, described in this month's Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies, a journal published quarterly by the Association for Computing Machinery, proved roughly 95% effective. (2019-09-18)

Researchers develop low-power, low-cost network for 5G connectivity
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a cheaper and more efficient method for Internet-of-Things devices to receive high-speed wireless connectivity. (2019-08-29)

App allows inspectors to find gas pump skimmers faster
A team of computer scientists at UC San Diego and the University of Illinois has developed an app that allows state and federal inspectors to detect devices that steal consumer credit and debit card data at gas pumps. The devices, known as skimmers, use Bluetooth to transmit the data they steal. (2019-08-14)

Manipulating brain cells by smartphone
Researchers have developed a soft neural implant that can be wirelessly controlled using a smartphone. It is the first wireless neural device capable of indefinitely delivering multiple drugs and multiple colour lights, which neuroscientists believe can speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases (2019-08-06)

Scientists can now manipulate brain cells using smartphone
A team of scientists in Korea and the United States have invented a device that can control neural circuits using a tiny brain implant controlled by a smartphone. The device could speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, addiction, depression, and pain. (2019-08-05)

NUS 'smart' textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have incorporated metamaterials into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between wearable electronic devices. This innovation could have future applications in high-tech athletic wear and medical apparel. (2019-07-16)

Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of grape may help chronic disease management
People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled. (2019-06-25)

Making the 'human-body internet' more effective
Human body communication (HBC) uses the human body to transmit power and data, much like the internet. Because it's a smaller and closed network, it has the benefit of being more secure and power efficient. In a recent study, a group of Japanese researchers used an equivalent circuit model to examine how different parameters affect HBC transmission characteristics. (2019-06-13)

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