Current Bmj News and Events

Current Bmj News and Events, Bmj News Articles.
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Ten lessons from the virus crisis
A mixture of smaller countries led by New Zealand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, Cyprus, Rwanda and Iceland led the world 's Top 10 countries to manage their COVID-19 response well, according to a new study. In the study, published in The BMJ, lead researcher Flinders University's Professor Fran Baum joined experts from around the world to reflect upon the Global Health Security Index (October 2019) predictions for a public health emergency. (2021-02-21)

Large-scale study finds genetic testing technology falsely detects very rare variants
A technology that is widely used by commercial genetic testing companies is 'extremely unreliable' in detecting very rare variants, meaning results suggesting individuals carry rare disease-causing genetic variants are usually wrong, according to new research published in the BMJ. (2021-02-15)

Counties with more cannabis dispensaries show reduced opioid deaths
This is the first study to examine the association between active cannabis dispensary operations -- both medical and recreational -- and opioid-related mortality rates at the county level, suggesting that providing alternative pain management could improve public health outcomes, researchers said. (2021-01-28)

Support for self isolation must be a top priority, say experts
Helping people to self isolate after testing positive for covid-19 must now be a top priority for the UK government, argue experts in The BMJ today. (2021-01-27)

Patients of Asian and black backgrounds more likely to die from COVID, large study reveals
Patients of Asian and black backgrounds suffered disproportionate rates of premature death from COVID-19, according to a study of 1,737 patients by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust. (2021-01-22)

Understanding how to improve antibodies targeting OX40 for the treatment of cancer
Scientists at the University of Southampton's Centre for Cancer Immunology have gained new insight into how the immune system can be better used to find and kill cancer cells. (2021-01-08)

From publication bias to lost in information
From publication bias to lost in information In BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, IQWiG researchers call for a central, public and worldwide portal for clinical trials (2020-12-11)

Research reveals how COVID-19 affects the eyes
Sore eyes are the most significant vision-based indicator of COVID-19, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Ophthalmology. (2020-12-08)

Spinal/epidural anesthesia associated with increased survival in leg artery bypass surgery
A new study published in The BMJ shows that people who had surgery to improve blood flow in their legs under spinal or epidural anesthesia were less likely to die than those who were given general anesthesia. (2020-11-25)

Doctors use existing treatment earlier to save the lives of Covid-19 patients
The lives of patients hospitalised with COVID-19 are being saved by doctors who are using an existing medical treatment at an earlier stage. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) in the first days of hospitalisation seems to save between 10% to 20% of patients. The researchers also found that the early use of CPAP potentially reduces lung damage during the worst of the COVID-19 infection and allows the patient to recover from the inflammatory effects. (2020-11-25)

Crossing international borders can be deadly for forced migrants
Crossing international borders can be dangerous, if not deadly, for refugees and asylum seekers, who have been displaced by conflict or a humanitarian crisis. According to data from the International Organization for Migration, from January 2014 to December 2018, there were more than 16,300 forced migrant deaths. These deaths did not occur at random but occurred in clusters reflecting distinct patterns in space and time that can be addressed by humanitarian interventions, according to a Dartmouth-led research team. (2020-11-16)

The dangers of collecting drinking water
Fetching drinking water in low and middle income countries can cause serious injury, particularly for women. A new international study published in BMJ Global Health reveals dangers including falls, traffic accidents, animal attacks, and fights, which can result in broken bones, spinal injuries, lacerations, and other physical injuries. The work draws on a survey of 6,291 randomly selected households across 24 sites in 21 low- and middle-income countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. (2020-11-04)

New analysis reveals 'long-hauler' COVID-19 patients with prolonged skin symptoms
Some COVID-19 patients experience long-lasting skin symptoms that vary according to type of COVID-19 skin rash (2020-10-29)

Easy home cancer test means patients can avoid hospital for colonoscopies
Findings from the largest international research study found that using FIT is almost 100% accurate at ruling out bowel cancer in patients with suspicious symptoms. During COVID, cancer diagnostics services were suspended and continue to be disrupted. Clinicians in London, along with NHS England, London region, agreed to rapidly implement the use of the same easy home test used in the bowel cancer screening programme, the FIT (faecal immunochemical test), to rule out cancer in people with suspected symptoms. (2020-10-23)

'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns linked to falling vaccination rates
'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns are linked to falling vaccination rates, reveals an international time trends analysis, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Voters unlikely to blame politicians for their handling of the pandemic at next election
Politicians are unlikely to be punished or rewarded for their failures or successes in managing the coronavirus pandemic at the next election, suggests an analysis of survey data from the US, the UK and India, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Covid-19 vaccine trials cannot tell us if they will save lives
Vaccines are being hailed as the solution to the covid-19 pandemic, but the vaccine trials currently underway are not designed to tell us if they will save lives, reports Peter Doshi, Associate Editor at The BMJ today. (2020-10-21)

Study finds athletes fear being judged as weak when they experience pain or injury
Trinity College Dublin researchers have carried out the first multi-centred, international, qualitative study exploring the athlete experience (in their own words) of sporting low back pain (LBP). The study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found a culture of concealment of pain and injury in rowers, leading to poor outcomes for these athletes. (2020-10-15)

New study shows which medical procedures pose COVID-19 risk to health-care providers
Autopsy, airway suctioning and cardiopulmonary resuscitation are among the list of medical procedures that pose a risk of spreading COVID-19 from a patient to their health-care provider by creating aerosols, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Respiratory Research. The team, led by UAlberta medicine professor Sebastian Straube, carried out a systematic review of public health guidelines, research papers and policy documents from around the globe to determine which procedures are classified as aerosol-generating. (2020-10-13)

Exercise intensity not linked to mortality risk in older adults, finds trial
Exercise intensity appears to make no difference to risk of mortality among older adults, suggests a randomised controlled trial from Norway published by The BMJ today. (2020-10-07)

Is it time to reframe the assisted dying debate?
Several articles published by The BMJ today explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives. (2020-09-30)

Lung cancer screening a step closer to reality following combined study
Newly released study results present a strong case for lung cancer screening in New Zealand - particularly for Māori whose mortality rates are between three and four times higher than other ethnic groups. (2020-09-28)

Revealed: Large discrepancies in accounting for the funding sources of some UK patient organisations
New analysis published in BMJ Open raises transparency concerns over funding to patient groups from big drug companies. (2020-09-20)

COVID-19 measures deepening health inequalities in slum communities
Efforts to stem the impact of COVID-19 in low to middle income countries could be creating a health time bomb in their slum communities by deepening existing inequalities, according to an international team of health researchers led by the University of Warwick. (2020-09-14)

COVID-19 policy makers could learn more about accountability from industries like aviation
Organisations could improve the transparency and accountability of COVID-19 policy making processes by learning from safety-critical industries like aviation, a new paper shows. (2020-09-14)

Systematic approach crucial for person-centred care
Systematic efforts and a clear structure are decisive factors in the transition to person-centred health care. A University of Gothenburg study, published in the scientific journal BMJ, reflects what is now a decade of experience and research in the field. (2020-09-10)

Gun owner perceptions about firearm dangers suggest opportunities for improving gun safety
There is significant disconnect among gun owners about perceived and actual firearm dangers. The UC Davis Health study points to new opportunities for improving gun safety messaging and public health awareness. (2020-09-08)

Hair dye and cancer risk: Largest study yet
Studies have indicated that people who dye their hair regularly may have a higher risk of cancer, especially bladder cancer and breast cancer. Hair dyes contain certain chemicals that have been held responsible for these relationships. In the largest study to date, which followed 117,200 women from the USA over 36 years, this could not be confirmed. (2020-09-03)

Experts make weak recommendation for remdesivir in severe COVID-19
In The BMJ today, a panel of international experts make a weak recommendation for the use of remdesivir in patients with severe covid-19, and strongly support continued enrolment of patients into ongoing clinical trials of remdesivir. (2020-07-30)

Existing evidence suggests face coverings do not lead to false sense of security
Existing limited evidence suggests that wearing face coverings to protect against COVID-19 does not lead to a false sense of security and is unlikely to increase the risk of infection through wearers foregoing other behaviours such as good hand hygiene, say researchers from the University of Cambridge and King's College London. (2020-07-26)

Men and younger adults less active in lockdown
New research published in the journal BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine indicates that men and younger adults have been less physically active during the COVID-19 lockdown. (2020-07-07)

New recommendations: People with high cholesterol should eliminate carbs, not saturated fat
An international team of experts on heart disease and diet say there's no evidence that a low-saturated fat diet reduces cholesterol in people with familial hypercholesterolemia. (2020-07-06)

Why are patient and public voices absent in COVID-19 policy-making?
Patient and public voices were ''regrettably'' absent in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, but must now move centre stage, argue experts in The BMJ today. (2020-07-01)

Integrating pharmacists into general practice can optimize patient treatment
Research undertaken by RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences suggests that integrating pharmacists into general practice (GP) teams facilitates collaboration to optimise treatment plans for patients with long-term medical needs and alleviate pressures on GP practices. (2020-06-29)

Researchers develop microscopy technique for noninvasive evaluation of wound healing
The GSK Center for Optical Molecular Imaging at the University of Illinois' Beckman Institute has designed a new microscopy technique that can be used to study the progression of wound healing. The technique can be applied to studying skin disorders such as foot ulcers in diabetic patients and psoriasis. (2020-06-17)

Female researchers majorly under-represented in COVID-19 research
New research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found significant gender bias in research authorship relating to COVID-19, which means that women's views are not equally shaping the response to the pandemic. (2020-06-11)

Immune cell discovery could improve the fight against hepatitis B
For the first time, researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) have identified and described a new and unique subset of human cells that are involved in the immune response against hepatitis B (HBV) infection. The discovery could help develop new treatments for HBV and inform future vaccine design. (2020-06-09)

Employers could face legal action over COVID-19 exposure, expert warns
Employers across the UK could face legal action from employees who return to work and contract the COVID-19 virus, a leading health and safety expert has warned. (2020-06-01)

High doses of vitamin D supplementation has no current benefit in preventing or treating COVID-19
Scientists from the UK, Europe and the USA, led by the University of Surrey have published a vitamin D consensus paper warning against high doses of vitamin D supplementation as current research shows it has no benefit in preventing or treating Covid-19. Scientists advise that the population adhere to Public Health England guidance on supplementation. (2020-05-21)

Most young people with increased suicide risk only display 'mild to moderate' mental distress -- study
Around 70% of young people who report self-harming or suicidal thoughts are within normal or non-clinical range of mental distress. First study to suggest 'prevention paradox' in mental health: tiny wellbeing improvements in entire populations will save as many if not more lives than focusing on high-risk groups. (2020-05-20)

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