Current Book News and Events

Current Book News and Events, Book News Articles.
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50 years since decimalisation: A very British compromise
February 15 2021 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the United Kingdom's switch to using decimal currency, and researcher Andy Cook has looked into this often-overlooked historical event for his PhD with the University of Huddersfield. (2021-02-12)

Spinal fluid of people with Alzheimer's risk gene signals inflammation
People who have a gene variant associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease also tend to have changes in the fluid around their brain and spinal cord that are detectable years before symptoms arise, according to new research from Duke Health. (2021-02-11)

How cells recycle the machinery that drives their motility?
Research groups at University of Helsinki and Institut Jacques Monod, Paris, discovered a new molecular mechanism that promotes cell migration. The discovery sheds light on the mechanisms that drive uncontrolled movement of cancer cells, and also revises the 'text book view' of cell migration. (2021-02-09)

Book developed at Cincinnati Children's helps identify risks of reading difficulties
A study published in the journal Pediatrics expands validation evidence for a new screening tool that directly engages preschool-age children during clinic visits to assess their early literacy skills. The tool, which is the first of its kind, has the potential to identify reading difficulties as early as possible, target interventions and empower families to help their child at home, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2021-02-04)

Is George's 'Marvellous Medicine' medically useful, dangerous, or both?
Increased time at home during the covid-19 pandemic may inspire budding scientists to search for a cure, but researchers in the Christmas issue of The BMJ warn of the potential toxicity of homemade potions. (2020-12-10)

Hundreds of copies of Newton's Principia found in new census
A systematic search for copies of the first edition of Newton's Principia (1687) unearthed copies in at least 27 countries, yielding new insights about how people engaged with the famous book. (2020-11-10)

Workshop collaboration aims to move tidal marsh research forward
Tidal marshes play a significant role in coastal ecosystems. They are a nursery ground for juvenile fishes and a line of defense in coastal erosion. However, there is still a great deal not known about tidal marshes. In November 2019, 65 scientists, managers, and restoration practitioners converged at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab to see where tidal marsh research has been and where it needs to go. (2020-11-09)

The First Book of Breathing: A new assessment based on an edition of papyrus FMNH 31324
Assessment of a Papyrus in the Field Museum has led to a new analysis of the First Book of Breathing, an ancient Egyptian funerary text intended to enable deceased people to join the gods in the afterlife. (2020-10-21)

NUS study reveals severe air pollution drives food delivery consumption and plastic waste
When the air outside is bad, office workers are more likely to order food delivery than go out for lunch, which in turn increases plastic waste from food packaging, according to a study by researchers from the National University of Singapore. (2020-10-19)

Busy pictures hinder reading ability in children
A new study published by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University shows extraneous images draw attention from text, reducing comprehension in beginning readers (2020-09-28)

What COVID-19 can teach tourism about the climate crisis
The global coronavirus pandemic has hit the tourism industry hard worldwide. Not only that, but it has exposed a lack of resilience to any type of downturn, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden. While the virus may or may not be temporary, the climate crisis is here to stay - and tourism will have to adapt, says Stefan Gössling, professor of sustainable tourism. (2020-07-15)

New study reveals people more likely to donate when reminded of own mortality
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business shows that people are 30 per cent more likely to donate their assets when faced with their own mortality. (2020-07-08)

Quantum physics provides a way to hide ignorance
Students can hide their ignorance and answer questions correctly in an exam without their lack of knowledge being detected by teachers -- but only in the quantum world. (2020-06-29)

Uganda's Ik are not unbelievably selfish and mean
The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. Instead, the Ik are quite cooperative and generous with one another, and their culture features many traits that encourage generosity. (2020-06-25)

NIST develops benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a way for laboratories to determine how accurately they can detect large mutations. The new method and the benchmark material enable researchers, clinical labs and commercial technology developers to better identify large genome changes they now miss and will help them reduce false detections of genome changes. (2020-06-15)

Piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls with DNA evidence
Piecing together the collection of more than 25,000 fragments of ancient manuscripts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls in order to understand their meaning has remained an incredibly difficult puzzle. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on June 2 have used an intriguing clue to help in this effort: DNA ''fingerprints'' lifted from the animal skins on which the texts were written. (2020-06-02)

Little scientists: Children prefer storybooks that explain why and how things happen
Children have a never-ending curiosity about the world around them and frequently question how and why it works the way it does. Researchers have previously demonstrated that children are interested in causal information, but had not yet linked this to a real-world activity, such as reading. A new study finds that children prefer causally-rich storybooks, suggesting that such content may be more engaging and could help to increase children's interest in reading. (2020-04-15)

Book on plants in the Murmansk region (Russia) scores 4/19 correct insect identifications
Mistakes can occur in any environment, but what if the records we read about are actually incorrect? The case of unqualified scientists publishing false records of insects in the Murmansk oblast of Russia is described in the recent paper in the open-access journal Arctic Environmental Research. (2020-03-04)

UTSA examines reporters' portrayal of US border under Trump
The southern US border has been portrayed as a bogeyman not only by the Trump administration but also surprisingly by major US news media. This is the latest finding according to an analysis of news reporting conducted at The University of Texas at San Antonio. (2020-02-12)

Likelihood of e-book purchases increase 31% by combining previews and reviews
New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research finds that the purchasing decision of customers considering buying e-books is significantly influenced through easy access to a combination of e-book previews and reviews, resulting in a staggering 31% increase in a consumer's likelihood to purchase an e-book. When exposed to either previews only or online reviews only, purchase likelihood is between 7 and 17%. (2020-01-30)

When it's story time, animated books are better for learning
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found that digital storybooks that animate upon a child's vocalization offer beneficial learning opportunities, especially for children with less developed attention regulation. (2019-12-19)

Researchers identify top ways to stop projected 142% rise in Latino cancer
This open-source book shares results of first conference with the same name. (2019-12-09)

Researchers investigate the effects of eye movements when reading texts in different languages
The existence of language universality has been a key issue in psychology and linguistics, since the understanding of universals is crucial for the development of information perception models. In the course of their in-depth study of linguistic universality, Lobachevsky University researchers studied readers' eye movements when reading texts in different languages. The research was aimed at studying the universal and language-specific effects of eye movements while reading texts. (2019-12-02)

Here's what you need to rise to the top
Passion, grit, the right mindset and support from others are what's needed to rank among the best in a given field. That's the only way you'll be able to keep yourself motivated and endure all the practice that's required. (2019-09-17)

Revealed: How our brain remembers the order of events
For centuries understanding how the order of events is stored in memory has been a mystery. However, researchers from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Warwick have worked out how the order of events in memory could be stored and later recalled in the hippocampal memory system in the brain. (2019-08-14)

Biologists pioneer first method to decode gene expression
Biologists have developed the first system for determining gene expression based on machine learning. Considered a type of genetic Rosetta Stone for biologists, the new method leverages algorithms trained on a set of known plant genes to determine a species-wide set of transcribed genes, or 'expressome,' then creates an atlas of expressible genes. The method carries implications across biology, from drug discovery to plant breeding to evolution. (2019-08-12)

Study finds fish preserve DNA 'memories' far better than humans
We are all familiar with the common myth that fish have poor memory, but it turns that their DNA has the capacity to hold much more memory than that of humans. In a study published recently in the journal Nature, University of Otago researchers report that memory in the form of 'DNA methylation' is preserved between generations of fish, in contrast to humans where this is almost entirely erased. (2019-08-07)

Questions during shared book reading with preschoolers need to be more challenging
When it comes to challenging young minds to grow language, asking how and why during shared book reading to preschoolers can be more beneficial, according to new research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2019-08-06)

Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions
When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown. But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions -- and those that they did ask were usually too simple. (2019-07-25)

UMD releases comprehensive review of the future of CRISPR technology in crops
CRISPR is thought of as 'molecular scissors' used to cut and edit DNA, but Yiping Qi, assistant professor at the University of Maryland, is looking far beyond these applications in his new publication in Nature Plants. In this comprehensive review, Qi explores the current state of CRISPR in crops, and how scientists can enhance traditional breeding techniques in nontraditional ways to a growing population in the face of climate change, diseases, and pests. (2019-07-15)

Arts & Medicine: Video, articles look back at 1978 novel 'The House of God'
The 1978 novel 'The House of God' is a fictional account of the internship experience of Samuel Shem, the pen name of Stephen Bergman, at Beth Israel Hospital in 1973-1974. Funny, angry, honest, and absurd, the book spotlighted the injustices of medical training and the patient care of that era and was pilloried by establishment medicine for years after publication for its razor-sharp version of the truth. (2019-07-10)

Good home learning in early years boosts your secondary school achievements
The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child's early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, according to a new study published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement. (2019-07-07)

Study finds that collaborating with business contributes to academic productivity
Results of survey involving more than 1,000 researchers were presented to 8th Annual Meeting of Global Research Council in São Paulo. (2019-05-03)

New reading of the Mesha Stele inscription has major consequences for biblical history
Tel Aviv University archaeologists say that a new reading of the inscription on the Mesha Stele has major consequences for biblical history. (2019-05-02)

New study highlights exaggerated physical differences between male and female superheroes
Superheroes like Thor and Black Widow may have what it takes to save the world in movies like Avengers: Endgame, but neither of their comic book depictions has a healthy body mass index (BMI). New research from Binghamton University and SUNY Oswego found that, within the pages of comic books, male superheroes are on average obese, while females are on average close to underweight. (2019-05-01)

New research adds to work of Prandtl, father of modern aerodynamics
Not only will this discovery be important for agriculture, aviation and weather prediction, but it will also be vital for climate change research and associated sea-level rise, as accurate prediction of katabatic surface wind profiles over large ice sheets and glaciers is critical in energy balance of melting ice. (2019-04-11)

Moneyball advantage peters out once everyone's doing it: Rotman paper
Sixteen years after author Michael Lewis wrote the book Moneyball, every Major League Baseball (MLB) team uses the technique. But a new study shows that while the tool can help a club create a stronger team -- at a lower cost -- it loses its edge once everyone's on to it. (2019-04-08)

A 'million word gap' for children who aren't read to at home
Young children whose parents read them five books a day enter kindergarten having heard about 1.4 million more words than kids who were never read to, a new study found. This 'million word gap' could be one key in explaining differences in vocabulary and reading development. (2019-04-04)

Does story time with an e-book change how parents and toddlers interact?
Traditional print books may have an edge over e-books when it comes to quality time shared between parents and their children, a new study suggests. (2019-03-25)

Teachers 'scarred' by legacy of 1988 anti-LGBT+ law
LGBT+ teachers who taught in schools during the late 1980s and 1990s remain scarred by the effects of Section 28 of the Local Government Act in England -- a piece of legislation introduced in 1988 banning the 'promotion' of homosexuality in schools -- according to new research published in the journal Sex Education. (2019-03-12)

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