Current Brain Activity News and Events

Current Brain Activity News and Events, Brain Activity News Articles.
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Everyday activities enhance personal well-being
Physical activity makes happy and is important to maintain psychic health. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Central Institute of Mental Health (CIMH) in Mannheim studied the brain regions which play a central role in this process. Their findings reveal that even everyday activities, such as climbing stairs, significantly enhance well-being, in particular of persons susceptible to psychiatric disorders. The study is published in Science Advances (DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaz8934). (2020-11-25)

Neuroscientists measure fans' reactions to the big game
In a study published November 25 in the journal Neuron, researchers show how the feelings of surprise experienced while watching sports creates shifts in brain patterns. These shifts are important for neuroscientists to understand because they contribute to the formation of memories that are particularly strong. (2020-11-25)

Are we the same person throughout our lives? In essence, yes
Although our body changes and our beliefs and values may vary throughout our lives, our essence remains stable. Research at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) has recorded brain activity in a group of individuals showing that our ability to recognise ourselves as distinctive --the ''continuity of the self''-- remains undiminished by change and that it takes us only 250 milliseconds to recognise ourselves. (2020-11-25)

Basketball on the brain: Neuroscientists use sports to study surprise
Princeton neuroscientists tracked the brains and pupils of self-described basketball fans as they watched March Madness games, to study how people process surprise -- an unexpected change of circumstances that shifts an anticipated outcome. They found that that shifts in the pattern of activity in high-level brain areas only happened at moments that contradicted the watchers' current beliefs about which team was more likely to win. (2020-11-25)

Cocoa flavanols boost brain oxygenation, cognition in healthy adults
The brains of healthy adults recovered faster from a mild vascular challenge and performed better on complex tests if the participants consumed cocoa flavanols beforehand, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports. In the study, 14 of 18 participants saw these improvements after ingesting the flavanols. (2020-11-24)

Brain waves guide us in spotlighting surprises
A new study by MIT and Boston University neuroscientists finds that the dynamic interplay of different brain wave frequencies, rather than dedicated circuitry, appears to govern the brain's knack for highlighting what's surprising and downplaying what's predictable. (2020-11-24)

Trinity researchers discover how the brain 're-wires' after disease
Trinity College researchers are studying how the brain re-wires itself in neurological disease. The team is building treatments for today's more common global conditions like Motor Neurone Disease (MND/ALS) and Spinal Muscular Atrophy and their findings could impact rehabilitation for patients, the discovery of effective drugs and quantifying the potential efficacy of new therapies. (2020-11-24)

Stronger memories can help us make sense of future changes
Research from the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences in Arts & Sciences finds a new relationship between memory and the ability to incorporate changes into one's understanding of the world. (2020-11-24)

Magnetic brain waves to detect injury and disease
Researchers have designed a new Optically Pumped Magnetometer (OPM) sensor for magnetoencephalography (MEG). The sensor is smaller and more robust in detecting magnetic brain signals and distinguishing them from background noise than existing sensors. Benchmarking tests showed good performance in environmental conditions where other sensors do not work, and it is able to detect brain signals against background magnetic noise, raising the possibility of MEG testing outside a specialised unit. (2020-11-23)

Targeting calcium overload could improve stroke outcomes, research suggests
Excessive calcium contributes to harmful inflammation in ischemic stroke, and targeting it may provide doctors with a new way to improve patient outcomes. (2020-11-23)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

Scientists identify brain cells that help drive bodily reaction to fear, anxiety
UNC School of Medicine discovered that artificially forcing the activity of BNST cells in mice produced an arousal response in the form of dilated pupils and faster heart rate, and worsened anxiety-like behaviors. This helps illuminate the neural roots of emotions, and point to the possibility that the human-brain counterpart of the newly identified population of arousal-related neurons might be a target of future treatments for anxiety disorders and other illnesses involving abnormal arousal responses. (2020-11-23)

Psychosis symptoms linked to impaired information spread in the brain
Altered white matter limits the brain's conscious access to information, potentially contributing to delusions and other psychotic symptoms of mental health disorders, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-23)

AI helps scientists understand brain activity behind thoughts
Researchers have developed artificial intelligence (AI) models that help them better understand the brain computations that underlie thoughts. (2020-11-23)

Memories create 'fingerprints' that reveal how the brain is organized
While the broad architecture and organization of the human brain is universal, new research shows how the differences between how people reimagine common scenarios can be observed in brain activity and quantified. These unique neurological signatures could ultimately be used to understand, study, and even improve treatment of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-20)

Lovestruck by oxytocin! Novel roles of the hormone in controlling male sexual function
Hormones are the master regulators of sexual functions in mammals. The hormone oxytocin has a well-established role in social bonding, sexual function, maternal instinct, nursing, and lactation. Researchers from Okayama University have now explored the roles of oxytocin in male sexual function for the first time. Findings from the study suggest that oxytocin-mediated control of male sexual function via the spinal cord may in fact be instrumental in treating erectile dysfunction. (2020-11-18)

Motor neural population activity patterns are different for reach and grasp behaviors
A new study from researchers at the University of Chicago has found that neuronal population dynamics in the motor cortex are very different during reaching and grasping behavior, challenging a popular theory that indicated intrinsic, dynamic patterns control motor behaviors. (2020-11-17)

Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-17)

Key source of memories
Researchers identify a region of the brain as a key source of signals encoding past experiences in the neocortex. (2020-11-16)

Scientists discover new mechanism controlling brain size
International research headed by Danish Scientists has led to the discovery of a new mechanism that controls the size of our brains. The finding, which is based on studies on a rare congenital brain disease, delivers an important piece of data in our knowledge about how the human brain is formed during development. (2020-11-16)

Envision color: Activity patterns in the brain are specific to the color you see
Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have decoded brain maps of human color perception. The findings, published today in Current Biology, open a window into how color processing is organized in the brain, and how the brain recognizes and groups colors in the environment. The study may have implications for the development of machine-brain interfaces for visual prosthetics. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-11-16)

Chronic alcohol use reshapes the brain's immune landscape, driving anxiety and addiction
Deep within the brain, a small almond-shaped region called the amygdala plays a vital role in how we exhibit emotion, behavior and motivation; it's also strongly implicated in alcohol abuse. Now, for the first time, a Scripps Research team has identified important changes to anti-inflammatory mechanisms and cellular activity in the amygdala that drive alcohol addiction. (2020-11-16)

Solitary bees are born with a functional internal clock - unlike honeybees
Individuals of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis show a 24-h behavioral cycle as soon as they emerge, unlike young honeybee workers who need to perform brood care around the clock and only develop a daily cycle later in life. This is reflected in a difference in the rate of brain development: in O. bicornis, but not in honeybees, neurons producing the ''pacemaker'' neuromodulator PDF are already maximally active immediately upon emergence. Sociality seems to have promoted a delay in maturation of the internal clock. (2020-11-16)

Changes to the brain's reward system may drive overeating in mice
A combination of innate differences and diet-induced changes to the reward system may predispose some mice to overeat, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-16)

From the inside out - how the brain forms sensory memories
New study identifies a region of the thalamus as a key source of signals encoding past experiences in the neocortex. (2020-11-15)

Worms reveal why melatonin promotes sleep
Melatonin is used as a dietary supplement to promote sleep and get over jet lag, but nobody really understands how it works in the brain. Now, researchers at UConn Health show that melatonin helps worms sleep, too, and they suspect they've identified what it does in us. (2020-11-13)

Physics can assist with key challenges in artificial intelligence
Two challenges in the field of artificial intelligence have been solved by adopting a physical concept introduced a century ago to describe the formation of a magnet during a process of iron bulk cooling. Using a careful optimization procedure and exhaustive simulations, researchers have demonstrated the usefulness of the physical concept of power-law scaling to deep learning. This central concept in physics has also been found to be applicable in AI, and especially deep learning. (2020-11-12)

Dopamine surge reveals how even for mice, 'there's no place like home'
''There's no place like home,'' has its roots deep in the brain. Using fiber photometry, scientists are the first to show that home evokes a surge of dopamine in mice that mimics the response to a dose of cocaine. The study demonstrates how dopamine rises rapidly in mice moved from a simple recording chamber to their home cage, but less so when they return to a cage not quite like the one they knew. (2020-11-12)

Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors
Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors. (2020-11-12)

Weekly physical activity may help prevent mild cognitive impairment conversion to dementia
Exercising more than once per week is associated with a lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment, research published in the open access journal Alzheimer's Research and Therapy suggests. (2020-11-12)

Researchers generate a brain cell type crucial to support neural activity
Researchers of the Department of Cellular Biology, Genetics and Physiology of the University of Malaga (UMA) have succeeded in generating human OLs from pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with nervous system diseases, specifically multiple sclerosis or ALS. (2020-11-12)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Research shows what happens in the sensory cortex when learning and recognising patterns
A study by scientists at the University of Sussex is challenging the common understanding of how mammalian brains work. (2020-11-12)

Machine learning algorithm could provide Soldiers feedback
A new machine learning algorithm, developed with Army funding, can isolate patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior and then decode it, potentially providing Soldiers with behavioral-based feedback. (2020-11-12)

Repeated small blasts put military, law enforcement at risk for brain injury
Military and law-enforcement personnel repeatedly exposed to low-level blasts have significant brain changes - including an increased level of brain injury and inflammation -- compared with a control group, a new study has found. (2020-11-12)

Re-mapping taste in the brain
A new study from Stony Brook University found that the map of neural responses mediating taste perception does not involve, as previously believed, specialized groups of neurons in the brain, but rather overlapping and spatially distributed populations. (2020-11-12)

Researchers light-up mouse brain, revealing previously hidden areas susceptible to opioids
New work at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University shows that kappa opioid receptors actually are distributed widely throughout the brain. The Temple researchers made this discovery after lighting up the brains of mice using a technique called CLARITY followed by three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent imaging. The study is the first to apply the imaging technique to better understand opioid receptor localization across the whole brain in 3D images. (2020-11-11)

Luddy researchers develop framework to study brain connectivity in living organisms
A new study by IU researchers lays out a large medical analytics framework that can be used in neuroscience and neurology to study brain connectivity in living organisms. (2020-11-11)

Fish give insight on sound sensitivity in autism
Scientists at The University of Queensland used zebrafish that carry the same genetic mutations as humans with Fragile X syndrome and autism, and discovered the neural networks and pathways that produce the hypersensitivities to sound in both species. (2020-11-10)

Optogenetic stimulation improves alterations in Huntington's disease experimental models
A study led by researchers of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) has characterized one of the neuronal circuits involved in the development of the Huntington's disease. The study, published in the journal eLife, shows in an animal model with the pathology, that optogenetic stimulation of the circuit causes improvements in the typical symptomatology of the disease. (2020-11-10)

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