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Current Brain Cells News and Events, Brain Cells News Articles.
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Blood pressure drug could help problem drinkers: QUT research
A drug used to treat high blood pressure may alleviate anxiety induced by long-term heavy alcohol use, and also halt the damage such drinking can cause to the brain's ability to grow new cells, research by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia shows. (2019-12-11)

The right mouse model is crucial for Huntington's disease drug development
Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable and fatal hereditary disease. Developing disease-modifying drugs to treat patients with HD depends on studying them in animal models. Scientists evaluated the mouse models used for developing new treatments for mood disorders in HD and recommended which of these models are most relevant to their studies. Their findings are published in the Journal of Huntington's Disease. (2019-12-11)

Scientists eager to explain brain rhythm boost's broad impact in Alzheimer's models
In a new review paper, MIT neuroscientists lay out the the few knowns and many unknowns that must be understood to determine why sensory stimuluation of 40Hz brain rhythms have broad effects, particularly in Alzheimer's models. (2019-12-11)

Tropical flower offers potential new route for treating pancreatic cancer
An international team of scientists led by the University of Bath have made drug-like molecules inspired by a chemical found in a tropical flower, that they hope could in the future help to treat deadly pancreatic cancer. (2019-12-11)

Researchers discover brain circuit linked to food impulsivity
A team of researchers that includes a faculty member at the University of Georgia has now identified a specific circuit in the brain that alters food impulsivity. (2019-12-11)

Dementia study reveals how proteins interact to stop brain signals
Fresh insights into damaging proteins that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease could aid the quest for treatments. (2019-12-10)

How playing the drums changes the brain
People who play drums regularly for years differ from unmusical people in their brain structure and function. The results of a study by researchers from Bochum suggest that they have fewer, but thicker fibres in the main connecting tract between the two halves of the brain. In addition, their motor brain areas are organised more efficiently. (2019-12-09)

How a penalty shootout is decided in the brain
Decision-making is controlled by different nerve cells. (2019-12-09)

The genetic signature of memory
Despite their importance in memory, the human cortex and subcortex display a distinct collection of 'gene signatures.' The work recently published in eNeuro increases our understanding of how the brain creates memories and identifies potential genes for further investigation. (2019-12-09)

Common genetic link between autism and Tourette's impairs brain communication
Scientists have discovered how a genetic alteration that increases the risk of developing Autism and Tourette's impacts on the brain. Their research also suggests that ketamine, or related drugs, may be a useful treatment for both of these disorders. Deletion of the Neurexin1 gene affects brain areas involved in Autism and Tourette's including the thalamus, a collection of brain regions that play a key role in helping other brain areas communicate with each other. (2019-12-09)

Virtual reality illuminates the power of opioid-associated memories
The brain acts differently when remembering environments associated with drug use. (2019-12-08)

Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons
A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. Knowing exactly how a single neuron operates among the billions housed in the human brain could one day help scientists design innovative ways to prevent and treat these diseases, such as targeted therapies. (2019-12-06)

Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion - the ways animals move - and brain architecture, using high-definition 3D models of lizard and snake brains. (2019-12-05)

Imaging of conjunctival goblet cells helps diagnosis of dry eyes
Professor Ki Hean Kim and his research team developed the world's first biometric imaging of conjunctival goblet cells with high definition. (2019-12-05)

How gene mutation causes autism and intellectual disability
Scientists have discovered why a specific genetic mutation causes intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder in children. The mutation results in fewer brain synapses, making it harder for the brain to learn. The discovery offers a new target for treatment. (2019-12-05)

Between arousal and inhibition
Why nerve cells in the brain process information differently. (2019-12-05)

Respiration key to increase oxygen in the brain
Contrary to accepted knowledge, blood can bring more oxygen to mice brains when they exercise because the increased respiration packs more oxygen into the hemoglobin, according to an international team of researchers who believe that this holds true for all mammals. (2019-12-04)

A new study reveals the function of corpora amylacea to remove brain waste substances
An article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) describes a new pathway in the central nervous system to expel waste substances from the brain through the creation of corpora amylacea (CA), aggregates formed by glucose polymers amassing waste products. (2019-12-04)

The gut may be involved in the development of multiple sclerosis
It is incompletely understood which factors in patients with multiple sclerosis act as a trigger for the immune system to attack the brain and spinal cord. A potential factor is described by a research team in the journal PNAS. The medical researchers used an animal model to show that the protein Smad7 mobilizes immune cells in the intestines which, in turn, trigger inflammation in the central nervous system. Analyses of intestinal tissue samples taken from MS patients confirmed the results. (2019-12-04)

Improving blood vessel health in the brain may help combat Alzheimer's
Researchers have found that very slow spontaneous blood vessel pulsations drive the clearance of substances from the brain, indicating that targeting and improving this process may help to prevent or treat amyloid-beta accumulation. (2019-12-03)

Decision-making process becomes visible in the brain
Transparent fish larvae reveal how a decision makes its way through the brain. (2019-12-02)

Researchers find clue to preventing addiction relapse
A study published in Neuropsychopharmacology reported that relapse can be prevented by controlling cells in a brain region called the nucleus accumbens. The study was conducted among 90 Sprague Dawley rats with genetic diversity. (2019-12-02)

Mapping the relay networks of our brain
A team of scientists led by Karl Farrow at NeuroElectronics Research Flanders (NERF, empowered by imec, KU Leuven and VIB) is unraveling how our brain processes visual information. They identified specific roles for distinct neuronal cell types in passing on information from the eye to downstream brain regions that guide behavior. Such knowledge is essential to understand how sensory information guides our actions and decisions. (2019-11-29)

Smoking may cause white scars on the brain
Nearly half of all people over the age of 50 have scarring in their brain's white matter. It turns out that does more harm than previously thought. (2019-11-29)

How individual cell types in the brain contribute to Alzheimer's disease
Despite great investments, an effective drug-based treatment for Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia among the elderly, remains elusive. Scientists led by Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with Monash University, have now published an online atlas of gene expressions at single-cell level in Alzheimer's disease brains, aiming to boost to efforts to identify gene targets for drug development. (2019-11-28)

Concussion recovery not clear cut for children
Sleep problems, fatigue and attention difficulties in the weeks after a child's concussion injury could be a sign of reduced brain function and decreased grey matter. (2019-11-28)

Discovery by Hebrew University scientists could revolutionize chemotherapy
Hebrew University Professor Alexander Binshtok has developed a method to limit the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to malignant cells, leaving healthy ones alone. The discovery has the potential to revolutionize cancer treatment by reducing or eliminating painful side effects associated with chemotherapy. (2019-11-27)

Scientists develop first implantable magnet resonance detector
A new miniature NMR implant measures neuronal activity. (2019-11-27)

Not seeing the trees for the wood
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have shown how it is possible that objects stand out less when they are surrounded by similar objects. This surroundings-suppressing effect is caused by feedback from higher visual brain areas. The results of this research are important for a better understanding of the way in which the brain transforms incoming light into a cohesive image. The paper has been published in the scientific journal Current Biology. (2019-11-27)

Exploring drug repurposing to treat glioblastoma
MALT1 blockers have long been in clinical use for the treatment of blood cancers. A study suggests that these drugs could potentially also be developed as a treatment option for glioblastoma, the most common and lethal type of brain tumor. (2019-11-27)

Beware of swimming if you use deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's
Researchers have identified nine cases of people who lost their ability to swim after having a deep brain stimulation device implanted to control symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The new research is published in the Nov. 27, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. All nine people had been good swimmers even after their Parkinson's disease diagnosis. But once they had deep brain stimulation surgery, researchers found while other movement symptoms improved, their swimming skills deteriorated. (2019-11-27)

Cerebral organoid model provides clues about how to prevent virus-induced brain cell death
Scientists have determined that La Crosse virus (LACV), which can cause inflammation of the brain in children, affects brain cells differently depending on their developmental stage. A new NIH study shows that uncommitted neural stems cells generally survive LACV infection, while LACV often kills neurons. The study also shows that neurons infected by LACV can be rescued by interferon, a powerful antiviral protein. The study results appear in the Journal of Neuroinflammation. (2019-11-26)

MRI reveals brain damage in obese teens
Researchers using MRI have found signs of damage that may be related to inflammation in the brains of obese adolescents, according to a new study. (2019-11-25)

Babies in the womb may see more than we thought
Light-sensitive cells active in the retina even before the fetus can distinguish images may play a larger role in the developing eye and brain than previously thought. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells seemingly help establish blood supply to the retina, circadian rhythms and the pupillary light reflex. UC Berkeley researchers have now discovered that these cells are electrically connected in a network that is able to detect light intensity, suggesting a bigger role in development. (2019-11-25)

The 'Signal Cell' relaying microbiota signals discovered
Prof. Seung-Woo Lee and his research team from POSTECH revealed the microbiota signal mechanism. (2019-11-25)

Cells study helping to crack the code to Alzheimer's disease
A study led by researchers at Monash University has opened up new hope for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's disease. (2019-11-25)

Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
More than ten percent of the cerebral cortex are involved in processing information about our sense of touch -- a larger area than previously thought. This is the result of a joint study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and Ruhr Universit├Ąt Bochum. (2019-11-25)

Effective method for correcting various CNS pathologies developing under oxygen deficiency
Hypoxia is a key factor that accompanies most brain pathologies, including ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases. Reduced oxygen concentration results in irreversible changes in nerve cell metabolism that entails cell death and destruction of intercellular interactions. Since neural networks are responsible for the processing, storage and transmission of information in the brain, the loss of network elements can lead to dysfunction of the central nervous system and, consequently, the development of neurological deficiency and the patient's severe disability. (2019-11-25)

New research identifies neurodevelopment-related gene deficiency
Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have identified that a gene critical to clearing up unnecessary proteins plays a role in brain development and contributes to the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. (2019-11-25)

Cellular origins of pediatric brain tumors identified
A research team has discovered that several types of highly aggressive and, ultimately, fatal pediatric brain tumors originate during brain development. The genetic event that triggers the disease happens in the very earliest phases of cellular development, most likely prenatal. The findings represent a significant advance in understanding these diseases. (2019-11-25)

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