Current Brain Imaging News and Events | Page 25

Current Brain Imaging News and Events, Brain Imaging News Articles.
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Name that tune: Brain takes just 100 to 300 milliseconds to recognize familiar music
The human brain can recognize a familiar song within 100 to 300 milliseconds, highlighting the deep hold favorite tunes have on our memory, a UCL study finds. (2019-10-30)

How are psychiatric disorders linked to infections during pregnancy?
Severe infections during pregnancy have been connected to a range of psychiatric disorders by different studies in humans and animals. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown in mice how the infections affect neuronal development as well as how the timing of the infection is important. (2019-10-30)

Key gene in familial Alzheimer's disease regulates neuronal development
An international team of researchers led by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona describes a new route that promotes differentiation of neurons. The discovery demonstrates that there is a common mechanism between the neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's and the proliferation of cancer cells. (2019-10-30)

Mass General team publishes on highest resolution brain MRI scan
A new paper describes a breakthrough 100 micron resolution scan of the human brain that was created by a multidisciplinary team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers. (2019-10-30)

Patients with mood, anxiety disorders share abnormalities in brain's control circuit
New research published today in JAMA Psychiatry shows for the first time that patients with mood and anxiety disorders share the same abnormalities in regions of the brain involved in emotional and cognitive control. (2019-10-30)

Seizures in babies: UVA sheds light on why they have lifelong effects
A doctor at University of Virginia Children's is using an elegant new approach to mapping brain activity to shed light on what happens during seizures in newborns that can lead to behavioral issues and learning disabilities much later. (2019-10-30)

Mitochondrial activity in lung tumors predicts response to drug inhibitor
Researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new biomarker using a noninvasive imaging method that tracks mitochondrial activity in lung tumors. (2019-10-30)

Ground-breaking work improves understanding of brain function
Dr. Corrado Calì, a Research Scientist specializing in brain imaging at KAUST, and Swiss scientists from the Blue Brain Project (BBP), have shown how lactate is necessary for memory formation and learning, which could lead to improved learning and memory function. (2019-10-29)

Study underscores changes in brain structure, function in long-duration space missions
New study demonstrates for the first time that changes in cognitive performance correlate with changes in brain structure in NASA astronauts following spaceflight. (2019-10-28)

New diagnostic method to determine liver cancer consistency
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have developed a new diagnostic technique which enables the grading of tumor consistency using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The researchers used an imaging technique known as tomoelastography to visualize the mechanical properties of liver tumors. Results from this research have been published in Cancer Research*. (2019-10-28)

Which came first: Brain size or drinking propensity?
Contrary to the belief that drinking can literally shrink one's brain, a new study that includes researchers from Arts & Sciences suggests that a small brain might be a risk factor for heavier alcohol consumption. (2019-10-28)

Study identifies brain injury as a cause of dementia in some older adults
A UCLA-led study finds that, with the use of MRI scans, it is possible to distinguish between memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury. (2019-10-23)

Mayo Clinic studies patient privacy in MRI research
Though identifying data typically are removed from medical image files before they are shared for research, a Mayo Clinic study finds that this may not be enough to protect patient privacy. (2019-10-23)

Identified a neural mechanism involved in the creation and consolidation of memories
The memory of specific episodes is the base of autobiographical memory, but we do not know how the brain structures the experience to remember it in the long run. A team of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Barcelona (UB) and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (BELLVITGE) has identified a neural mechanism that could help explain how the brain creates memories of episodes. (2019-10-22)

Scientists identify what may be a key mechanism of opioid addiction
Scientists at Scripps Research have discovered a molecular process in brain cells that may be a major driver of drug addiction, and thus may become a target for future addiction treatments. (2019-10-22)

Optoacoustic imaging shows potential for noninvasive diagnostics for thyroid disorders
A novel, noninvasive imaging technique can provide new information about thyroid disorders that will help in evaluation and diagnosis, according to an article featured in the October 2019 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2019-10-22)

Looking inside the body with indirect light
Scientists at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Japan, report an imaging technique that gives finer details of blood vessels in live patients in real time than current diagnostic machines used in the clinic. The technique depends on capturing and analyzing non-epipolar light, which carries scattering information useful for detailing objects under the skin's surface. (2019-10-22)

The night gardeners: Immune cells rewire, repair brain while we sleep
Science tells us that a lot of good things happen in our brains while we sleep -- learning and memories are consolidated and waste is removed, among other things. New research shows for the first time that important immune cells called microglia -- which play an important role in reorganizing the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage -- are also primarily active while we sleep. (2019-10-21)

BU researchers identify unique brain changes in people with Huntington's disease
The part of the brain that selectively degenerates in people with Huntington's disease (HD), called the striatum, is almost entirely destroyed in the late stages of the disease. Brain samples from mutant HD gene positive individuals who had not yet developed symptoms by time of death are extremely rare. As a consequence, very little is known about the active disease process that causes the devastating symptoms of HD. (2019-10-21)

Study suggests a new way to think about the brain's link to postpartum depression
Chronic stress during pregnancy triggers an immune response in the brain that has potential to alter brain functions in ways that could contribute to postpartum depression, new research in animals suggests. (2019-10-21)

AI rivals expert radiologists at detecting brain hemorrhages
An algorithm developed by scientists at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley did better than two out of four expert radiologists at finding tiny brain hemorrhages in head scans -- an advance that one day may help doctors treat patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI), strokes and aneurysms. The continued increase in diagnostic imaging studies, including 3D imaging studies such as computed tomography (CT), means that radiologists are looking at thousands of images each day. (2019-10-21)

Make some noise: How background noise affects brain activity
Have you ever found it difficult to focus on a task due to background noise? Scientists at the University of Alberta are studying just how these sounds impact our brain activity --and what that impact means for designing neurotechnology. (2019-10-18)

BARseq builds a better brain map
A brain mapping technique called BARseq is capable of mapping thousands of neurons in a single mouse, at single neuron resolution, while also detailing which neuron expresses what genes. It could be a game-changer for how neuroscientists look at brains. (2019-10-17)

New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in minimally conscious or vegetative state
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialled for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. (2019-10-17)

Study focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington's disease
A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington's disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes. (2019-10-16)

'I predict your words': that is how we understand what others say to us
We are at a fun but noisy party: how can we understand the words someone is saying to us despite the background music and voices? Thanks to the hard work of our brain and a special trick, it is capable of using: 'predicting' the words that are said. Based on the first sounds that arrive at it directly, the brain makes a prediction, 'suggesting' a solution. The study supports the idea that sees the brain as a proper 'predictive machine'. (2019-10-15)

Brain networks more stable in individuals with higher cognitive abilities
Brain imaging study investigates why cognitive abilities differ between individuals. (2019-10-15)

Novel technique helps explain why bright light keeps us awake
Researchers at the Salk Institute and UC San Diego are reporting a novel technique for tracing the activity of individual nerve fibers known as axons, and determining how neurons communicate. The team used this technique to uncover details about how the brain responds to light signals received by the retina in mice. (2019-10-15)

The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. This has to do, among other things, with the evolution of novel brain structures that enabled complex behaviors such as language and tool production. A study by anthropologists at the University of Zurich now shows that changes in the brain occurred independent of evolutionary rearrangements of the braincase. (2019-10-15)

More aggressive blood pressure control benefits brains of older adults
The UConn Health study followed 199 hypertension patients 75 years of age and older for 3 years. (2019-10-15)

Glowing particles in the blood may help diagnose and monitor brain cancer
A chemical that has improved surgeries for brain cancer by making tumor cells fluorescent may also help doctors safely diagnose the disease and monitor its response to treatment. (2019-10-15)

Sensory and motor brain plasticity is not limited by location
The new function of unused cortical regions is not necessarily determined by the function of nearby cortical regions, according to new research in adults born without one hand, published in JNeurosci. (2019-10-14)

New brain research could change how concussions are treated
Researchers looked at postmortem tissues of patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in high-resolution and found greater signs of blood vessel damage than nerve damage. The findings could influence the treatment of and development of new drugs for TBI. (2019-10-13)

Microbleeds may worsen outcome after head injury
Using advanced imaging, researchers have uncovered new information regarding traumatic microbleeds, which appear as small, dark lesions on MRI scans after head injury but are typically too small to be detected on CT scans. The findings published in Brain suggest that traumatic microbleeds are a form of injury to brain blood vessels and may predict worse outcomes. The study was conducted in part by scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-10-13)

Overcoming the blood-brain-barrier: Delivering therapeutics to the brain
For the first time, scientists have identified a simple way that can effectively transport medication into the brain - which could lead to improved treatments for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. (2019-10-11)

Imaging tumor stiffness could help enhance treatment for breast and pancreatic cancer
Using a noninvasive imaging technique that measures the stiffness of tissues gives crucial new information about cancer architecture and could aid the delivery of treatment to the most challenging tumors, new research shows. (2019-10-11)

Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: Evidence from brain connectivity evaluation
The researchers recruited healthy older participants to two groups according to their history of tea drinking frequency and investigated both functional and structural networks to reveal the role of tea drinking on brain organization. (2019-10-11)

Slower walkers have older brains and bodies at 45
The walking speed of 45-year-olds can be used as a marker of their aging brains and bodies. The evidence was there in neurocognitive testing these individuals took at age 3 to indicate who would become the slower walkers. At 45, slower walkers have 'accelerated aging' on a 19-measure scale devised by researchers, and their lungs, teeth and immune systems tended to be in worse shape than the people who walked faster. (2019-10-11)

Blood test could help to accelerate brain cancer diagnosis
A blood test which could help to accelerate the diagnosis of brain cancer has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde. (2019-10-09)

Finding upends theory about the cerebellum's role in reading and dyslexia
New brain imaging research debunks a controversial theory about dyslexia that can impact how it is sometimes treated. The cerebellum, a brain structure traditionally considered to be involved in motor function, has been implicated in the reading disability, developmental dyslexia, however, this 'cerebellar deficit hypothesis' has always been controversial. The new research shows that the cerebellum is not engaged during reading in typical readers and does not differ in children who have dyslexia. (2019-10-09)

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