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Current Brain Regions News and Events, Brain Regions News Articles.
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Modeling the brain during pain processing
Through new research published in EPJ B, researchers show that inhibitory interneurons, which prevent chemical messages from passing between different regions of the brain, make up 20% of the circuitry in the brain required for pain processing. The discovery represents a significant advance in researchers' understanding of how our bodies and brains respond to pain. (2021-02-02)

Almost 30% of advanced manufacturing technologies used in Russia are acquired abroad
Russian enterprises have limited opportunities to carry out technological modernisation on their own. Their technological portfolios reveal a high dependence on imported solutions and a limited deployment of their own developments, HSE University researchers discovered. (2021-02-02)

New realm of personalized medicine with brain stimulation
Millions of patients suffering from neurological and mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and chronic pain are treatment-resistant. New research paves the way for a promising alternative: personalized deep brain stimulation. Researchers have found a way to predict what effect electrical stimulation will have on an individual's brain activity across multiple brain regions. The work represents a major step forward in achieving new therapies for a whole host of neurological and mental disorders. (2021-02-01)

A study reveals that the brain distributes sensory information highly efficiently
Extracting information from a small fraction of neurons, according to a study published in Nature Communications, involving Rubén Moreno-Bote, a researcher at the Center for Brain and Cognition, together with researchers from the University of Zaragoza and the University of the Basque Country, led by Harvard University (USA). (2021-02-01)

Scientists solve long-standing mystery by a whisker
A team of neuroscientists at the University of California, Riverside, has experimented on mice to identify the brain region that functions beyond sensory encoding and motor encoding, potentially opening up new directions to studying the cellular and circuit mechanisms of sensory-motor transformations. The researchers report a cortical region traditionally defined as whisker motor cortex in mice is most directly related to the transformation process. (2021-01-29)

How the brain is programmed for computer programming?
Expert computer programmers show higher proficiency in certain behavioural and attention skills than their novice peers. To identify the responsible brain regions, scientists used fMRI to analyse the brain activities of 30 programmers of different skill level, finding that seven regions of the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices in expert programmers' brains are fine-tuned for programming. The findings could provide better methods and tools for everyone to learn programming. (2021-01-28)

Brain 3D genome study uncovers human-specific regulatory changes during development
A team led by Prof. SU Bing from the Kunming Institute of Zoology (KIZ) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Prof. LI Cheng from Peking University, and Prof. ZHANG Shihua from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science of CAS has reported the highest resolution by far of the 3D genome of the primate brain, and demonstrated the molecular regulatory mechanisms of human brain evolution through cross-species multi-omics analysis and experimental validation. (2021-01-28)

Risk-taking behavior has a signature in the brain, big data shows
While there is no such thing as a single ''risk area'' of the brain, a study of 12,000 people led by the University of Pennsylvania's Gideon Nave found a connection between genes, lower levels of gray matter, and risky behavior. (2021-01-28)

New gene variant linked to stroke
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have identified a gene variant that can cause cerebral small vessel disease and stroke. The study is published in Neurology Genetics. (2021-01-28)

Unlocking PTSD: New study reveals why trauma-focused psychotherapy treatment works
MEDIA: Trauma-focused psychotherapy is the best-known treatment for PTSD. But how does it work? Dell Med researcher Greg Fonzo says he may have found the answer by exploring how different parts of the brain talk to one another. (2021-01-27)

When simpler is harder
Some languages require less neural activity than others. But these are not necessarily the ones we would imagine. In a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown that languages that are often considered 'easy' actually require an enormous amount of work from our brains. (2021-01-27)

How does the immune system keep tabs on the brain?
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that immune cells stationed in the meninges, the tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord, monitor the brain and initiate an immune response if they detect a problem. (2021-01-27)

In a tight spot
A newly discovered circuit helps fish to prioritize. (2021-01-27)

Detecting ADHD with near perfect accuracy
A new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher has identified how specific communication among different brain regions, known as brain connectivity, can serve as a biomarker for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2021-01-27)

Squeeze it like toothpaste: The flexible brain of marsupial mammals
Being stretchy and squeezable may be the key to finding space for the brain in mammals, including humans. An international study, co-led by Flinders University's Vera Weisbecker, has revealed that marsupial mammals like possums, kangaroos, and wombats appear to have a lot of flexibility when it comes to accommodating their brains into their skulls. (2021-01-27)

New study: Malaria tricks the brain's defence system
Malaria is one of the most common causes of death in children in Africa. When the parasite builds up in the blood vessels of the brain, it develops into one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, cerebral malaria. Though it wasn't certain if the parasite was able to penetrate the brain tissue, now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found parasites can do that and have mapped the mechanism they utilise. (2021-01-26)

First observation of the early link between proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
Study conducted by researchers from the GIGA CRC In vivo Imaging laboratory at ULiège demonstrates, for the first time in humans, how the first deposits of tau proteins in the brainstem are associated with neurophysiological processes specific to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease development. (2021-01-25)

Stimulating brain pathways shows origins of human language and memory
Scientists have identified that the evolutionary development of human and primate brains may have been similar for communication and memory. (2021-01-25)

Musicians have more connected brains than non-musicians
The brains of musicians have stronger structural and functional connections compared to those of non-musicians, regardless of innate pitch ability, according to new research from JNeurosci. (2021-01-25)

MRI helps unravel the mysteries of sleep
Scientists at EPFL and the Universities of Geneva, Cape Town and Bochum have joined forces to investigate brain activity during sleep with the help of MRI scans. It turns out our brains are much more active than we thought. (2021-01-22)

A study explores the alteration of the functional dynamics of the human brain associated with ageing
A study published in Cerebral Cortex, led by Gustavo Deco, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, with Anira Escrichs as first author, in collaboration with several research centres in Lleida and Girona and participation by the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada). (2021-01-22)

Abnormal hyperactivation in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer's
A research team led by UdeM psychology and neuroscience professor Sylvie Belleville has just targeted an early biomarker of the disease. (2021-01-21)

Automated imaging reveals where TAU protein originates in the brain in Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have developed an automated method that can track the development of harmful clumps of TAU protein related to Alzheimer's disease in the brain, according to work involving 443 individuals. (2021-01-20)

Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk. (2021-01-20)

Balancing brain cell activity
Electrical trigger sites in neurons surprisingly change with experience; they are either becoming smaller with increasing number of experiences and, vice versa, they grow larger when less input arrives in the brain. (2021-01-20)

Tiny high-tech probes reveal how information flows across the brain
A new study from researchers at the Allen Institute collected and analyzed the largest single dataset of neurons' electrical activity to glean principles of how we perceive the visual world around us. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, captures the hundreds of split-second electrical signals that fire when an animal is interpreting what it sees. (2021-01-20)

Eye tests predict Parkinson's-linked cognitive decline 18 months ahead
Simple vision tests can predict which people with Parkinson's disease will develop cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later, according to a new study by UCL researchers. In a related study, the researchers also found that structural and functional connections of brain regions become decoupled throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. (2021-01-19)

Study finds COVID-19 attack on brain, not lungs, triggers severe disease in mice
Georgia State University biology researchers have found that infecting the nasal passages of mice with the virus that causes COVID-19 led to a rapid, escalating attack on the brain that triggered severe illness, even after the lungs were successfully clearing themselves of the virus. (2021-01-19)

The brain region responsible for self-bias in memory
A brain region involved in processing information about ourselves biases our ability to remember, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2021-01-18)

Increased blood flow during sleep tied to critical brain function
Our brains experience significant changes in blood flow and neural activity during sleep, according to Penn State researchers. Such changes may help to clean out metabolic brain waste that builds up during the day. (2021-01-18)

Artificial Intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
A new piece of research shows that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memories, and with less hassle than AI. The new study, carried out by SISSA scientists in collaboration with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience & Centre for Neural Computation, Trondheim, Norway, has just been published in Physical Review Letters. (2021-01-15)

Revisiting the Global Workspace orchestrating the hierarchical organisation of the human brain
A paper published on 4 January in the open access journal Nature Human Behavior by Gustavo Deco, director of the Brain and Cognition Center, and Morten L. Kringelbach, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Oxford University (UK) and the Center for Music in the Brain, University of Aarhus (Denmark). (2021-01-15)

The COVID-19 pandemic in brazil has overwhelmed its health systems
An analysis of the first 250,000 patients admitted to hospital with coronavirus reveals a high mortality and inequities in the quality of healthcare across regions (2021-01-15)

Unexplained 7-fold variation in euthanasia rates across the Netherlands
There's a 7-fold unexplained variation in rates of euthanasia across The Netherlands, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. (2021-01-14)

Disagreeing takes up a lot of brain real estate
In a new study Yale scientists looked into the brains of individuals engaged in conversation. What they observed varied significantly depending on whether or not the participants were in agreement. (2021-01-13)

Getting romantic at home wearing an EEG cap
Research into the neuronal basis of emotion processing has so far mostly taken place in the laboratory, i.e. in unrealistic conditions. Bochum-based biopsychologists have now studied couples in more natural conditions. Using electroencephalography (EEG), they recorded the brain activity of romantic couples at home while they cuddled, kissed or talked about happy memories together. The results confirmed the theory that positive emotions are mainly processed in the left half of the brain. (2021-01-13)

Master designers: Architects of the brain revealed
In a study published in Cell Reports, researchers at Kanazawa University identify pathways in the brain which enable neurons to assemble into functional units resembling tall columns. (2021-01-12)

Turbulent dynamics in the human brain could revolutionize the understanding of its functionality
According to a new study, published on 8 December in Cell Reports, by Gustavo Deco, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, and Morten L. Kringelbach, researcher at the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Oxford (United Kingdom) and the Center for Music in the Brain of the University of Aarhus (Denmark). (2021-01-12)

SARS-CoV-2 can infect neurons and damage brain tissue, study indicates
Using both mouse and human brain tissue, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect the central nervous system and have begun to unravel some of the virus's effects on brain cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may help researchers develop treatments for the various neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19. (2021-01-12)

Imagining a face reactivates face-detecting neurons in humans
Face-sensitive neurons in humans employ distinct activity patterns to encode individual faces; those patterns reactivate when imagining the face, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2021-01-11)

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