Current Brain Tumor News and Events | Page 25

Current Brain Tumor News and Events, Brain Tumor News Articles.
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Brain tumors form synapses with healthy neurons, Stanford-led study finds
Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown for the first time that severe brain cancers integrate into the brain's wiring. (2019-09-18)

The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. The work is published in Nature. (2019-09-18)

Learning to read boosts the visual brain
How does learning to read change our brain? Does reading take up brain space dedicated to seeing objects such as faces, tools or houses? In a functional brain imaging study reported in Science Advances, a research team led by the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics compared literate and illiterate adults in India. Reading recycles a brain region that is already sensitive to evolutionarily older visual categories, enhancing rather than destroying sensitivity to other visual input. (2019-09-18)

Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy
Researchers have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy. This new nano-tool provides a new approach to use cell-based nanomedicines for efficient cancer chemotherapy. (2019-09-17)

Study gives clues to the origin of Huntington's disease, and a new way to find drugs
Using a new technique to study brain development, scientists were able to trace the causes of Huntington's back to early developmental stages when the brain has only just begun to form. (2019-09-17)

Biological mechanism explained: How lymphoma cells metastasize to the brain
Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center have now discovered which molecular mechanism leads to lymphomas forming metastases in the central nervous system. Using a mouse model, they showed that chronic inflammatory processes in aging brains lead to lymphoma cells that have entered the brain tissue being retained instead of being released directly back into the blood. They also identified key molecules of this mechanism in tissue samples from patients with lymphomas of the CNS. (2019-09-16)

Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish, published in Neuron. (2019-09-16)

Social isolation derails brain development in mice
Female mice housed alone during adolescence show atypical development of the prefrontal cortex and resort to habitual behavior in adulthood, according to new research published in eNeuro. These findings show how social isolation could lead to an over-reliance on habit-like behaviors that are associated with addiction and obesity. (2019-09-16)

Two studies show promise, safety of proton therapy in the brain in children with cancer
From improving outcomes in children with brain cancer to lowering the risk of damage to the brainstem in children with central nervous system tumors, a pair of new studies published today add to the growing body of research showing the potential benefits of proton therapy. (2019-09-12)

Study led by NUS scientists show that drinking tea improves brain health
A recent study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore revealed that regular tea drinkers have better organised brain regions compared to non-tea drinkers. (2019-09-12)

The genetics of cancer
A research team has identified a new circular RNA (ribonucleic acid) that increases tumor activity in soft tissue and connective tissue tumors. It's a discovery that may help improve how cancer is identified and treated. (2019-09-12)

How breast cancer uses exosomes to metastasize to the brain
In breast cancer, metastases to the brain often spell a death sentence; many women survive for less than a year after diagnosis. A new study reveals how the cancer is able to cross the blood-brain-barrier: by sending out exosomes that hijack the natural cell process of transcytosis, tricking the cells in the BBB into taking them up. The researchers now hope to identify therapeutic targets that could stop brain metastases from happening. (2019-09-12)

Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss in Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia but the changes in brain cell function underlying memory loss remains poorly understood. Researchers at the University of Bristol have identified that calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss. (2019-09-11)

New study points to universal code in our brains for what we find beautiful
A network in the human brain involved in inner thoughts and self-referential mental processing may contain a universal code for whether we find something to be beautiful. (2019-09-11)

Foot painters' toes mapped like fingers in the brain
Using your feet like hands can cause organized 'hand-like' maps of the toes in the brain, never before documented in people, finds a new UCL-led study of two professional foot painters, published in Cell Reports. (2019-09-10)

Existing drug could treat aggressive brain cancer
A research team from the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that a compound molecule used for drug delivery of insulin could be used to treat glioblastoma, an aggressive, usually fatal form of brain cancer. (2019-09-10)

New research provides hope for people living with chronic pain
Dr. Gerald Zamponi, Ph.D., and a team with the Cumming School of Medicine's Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) and researchers at Stanford University, California, have been investigating which brain circuits are changed by injury, in order to develop targeted therapies to reset the brain to stop chronic pain. (2019-09-09)

Research shows puberty changes the brains of boys and girls differently
Scientists have found that brain networks develop differently in males and females at puberty, with boys showing an increase in connectivity in certain brain areas, and girls showing a decrease in connectivity as puberty progresses. These analyses were focused on brain regions previously identified as conferring risk for mood problems in adolescents, suggesting an association, although this needs to be tested. This work is presented at the ECNP Congress in Copenhagen, and is based on a recent peer-reviewed publication. (2019-09-09)

Repetitive impacts key to understanding sports-associated concussions
Scientists have made a significant advance in our understanding of mild head trauma (concussive brain injury) and how it may be managed and treated in the future. It seems that repetitive impacts -- as opposed to single events -- cause the all-important damage to blood vessels in the brain. These repetitive impacts can be visualized via an MRI signal. (2019-09-09)

Watching music move through the brain
Scientists have observed how the human brain represents a familiar piece of music, according to research published in JNeurosci. Their results suggest that listening and remembering music involve different cognitive processes. (2019-09-09)

Liquid biopsies reveal genetic alterations linked to cancer drug resistance
New research shows that liquid biopsies taken from blood provide a more complete picture than traditional biopsy of both the genetic diversity of a patient's cancer and how tumors evolve drug resistance at the molecular level. (2019-09-09)

Keynote 189: Tumor mutational burden not significantly associated with efficacy of pembrolizumab
Tumor mutational burden was not significantly associated with efficacy of pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy or placebo plus chemotherapy as first-line therapy for metastatic nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer, according to research reported today by Dr. M. Garassino from the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. Dr. Garassino presented this new data today at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2019-09-08)

How our brain filters sounds
When two identical sounds are repeated quickly, a filter reduces the attention that the brain directs to the second sound it hears. In people with schizophrenia, this ability to reduce the brain's response to identical sounds does not function properly. But the question is: Why? Neuroscientists (UNIGE) have been investigating the mechanism that lies behind this auditory sensory gating. Their results show that the filtering begins at the very beginning of the auditory stimuli processing. (2019-09-06)

Discovered the potential of antihistamines that cause the death of leukaemic stem cells
The IJC Leukaemic Stem Cell research group, led by Ruth M. Risueño, has discovered in preclinical trials that a particular group of antihistamines can kill leukaemic stem cells. (2019-09-06)

Study locates brain areas for understanding metaphors in healthy and schizophrenic people
Scientists have used MRI scanners to discover the parts of the brain which understand metaphors, in both healthy volunteers and people with schizophrenia. They found that people with schizophrenia employ different brain circuits to overcome initial lack of understanding. The researchers hope this identification of brain reactions and affected areas may help people with schizophrenia to better comprehend metaphors in everyday speech. This work is presented at the ECNP congress in Copenhagen. (2019-09-06)

Not just images
Hebrew University scientists have successfully transformed an MRI from a diagnostic camera into a device that can record changes in the biological makeup of brain tissue. The development will help doctors understand whether a patient is merely aging or developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. (2019-09-05)

Discovered a molecule that regulates the development of cancer in a variety of tumors
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute (IJC), discover that a non-coding region of the genome originates a key molecule for the proliferation of tumors in breast cancer and some types of sarcoma. (2019-09-04)

Single traumatic brain injury can have long-term consequences for cognition
A single incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to long-lasting neurodegeneration, according to a study of 32 individuals. (2019-09-04)

Protein tangles linked with dementia seen in patients after single head injury
Scientists have visualized for the first time protein 'tangles' associated with dementia in the brains of patients who have suffered a single head injury. (2019-09-04)

MD Anderson study confirms protein as potential cause of most common type of pancreatic cancer
An oncogene, UPS21, has been confirmed as a frequently amplified gene in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the most common and often lethal form of pancreatic cancer. The discovery could lead to new treatment options. (2019-09-04)

Breast cancer gene a potential target for childhood liver cancer treatment
Hepatoblastoma is a rare liver cancer that mainly affects infants and young children and is associated with mutations in the β-catenin gene. Researchers from Osaka University screened uncharacterized targets of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and confirmed that breast cancer gene GREB1 plays a major role in hepatoblastoma cell proliferation. By interfering with GREB1 protein production, tumor formation was inhibited in a mouse liver cancer model, suggesting this approach could be used to develop a targeted hepatoblastoma therapy. (2019-09-03)

Discovered a factor that predicts long survival in brain tumor
Researchers of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute have discovered an epigenetic lesion that allows identifying those patients affected by brain tumors that have a longer life expectancy. (2019-09-03)

How humans have shaped dogs' brains
Dog brain structure varies across breeds and is correlated with specific behaviors, according to new research published in JNeurosci. These findings show how, by selectively breeding for certain behaviors, humans have shaped the brains of their best friends. (2019-09-02)

Map of broken brain networks shows why people lose speech in language-based dementia
Scientists have drawn a map that illustrates three regions in the brain of people with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) that fail to talk to each other, inhibiting a person's speech production, word finding and word comprehension. The map can be used to target those brain regions with therapies, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), to potentially improve an affected person's speech. (2019-09-01)

Creation of new brain cells plays an underappreciated role in Alzheimer's disease
In a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, Sangram Sisodia and his colleagues show how in genetic forms of Alzheimer's, a process called neurogenesis, or the creation of new brain cells, can be disrupted by the brain's own immune cells. (2019-08-30)

Delivering immunotherapy directly to brain tumors
A new study published this week gives insight into how cancer immunotherapies might one day be delivered directly to the brain in order to treat brain tumors. The study, in Nature Communications, demonstrated that a new type of nano-immunotherapy traversed the blood-brain barrier in laboratory mice, inducing a local immune response in brain tissue surrounding the tumors. The tumor cells stopped multiplying, and survival rates increased. (2019-08-29)

Lack of oxygen doesn't kill infant brain cells, as previously thought
Research, conducted at OHSU and published in the Journal of Neuroscience, raises new concerns about the vulnerability of the preterm brain to hypoxia. Results confirm that brain cells do not die as previously believed. Rather, hippocampal cells fail to mature normally, causing a reduction in long-term potentiation, or the cellular basis of how the brain learns. (2019-08-29)

Cracking the code of a brain cancer that keeps coming back
Researchers used a powerful new computer-assisted technology called single-cell transcriptomics that measures thousands of individual cells simultaneously to map cell types and molecular cascades that drive the growth of SHH-medulloblastoma. In a study published Aug. 29, 2019 by the journal Cancer Cell, the scientists report they discovered new treatment strategies for the disease that may help patients fight a recurrent cancer. (2019-08-29)

A protective factor against Alzheimer's disease?
Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich have found that a protein called TREM2 could positively influence the course of Alzheimer's disease. (2019-08-29)

Nanoparticles 'click' immune cells to make a deeper penetration into tumors
IBS scientists reported a novel targeting strategy that allows deep tumor penetration of drug-loaded nanoparticles. They induced the linking of immune cell-targeting antibodies to drug-loaded nanoparticles on the cells, instead of taking them up in the cells or using antibody-nanoparticle conjugates. (2019-08-28)

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