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Current Brain News and Events, Brain News Articles.
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New model explains when the brain becomes aware of information
EPFL scientists propose that periods of unconscious processing--during which the brain integrates information--precede brief moments of consciousness (2020-09-03)

Bilingual children may lose less brain matter as they grow up
Children and adolescents who speak more than one language may reach adulthood with better brain structure, according to a new study. (2020-09-02)

Strokes in babies are surprisingly common; here's how the body rushes to the rescue
New research is shedding light on the development of the brain's immune defenses - and how those defenses respond to strokes that strike one in 4,000 babies in the first month of life. (2020-08-31)

Imaging an estrogen related enzyme may help to predict obesity, self-control issues
Findings to be published in PNAS from a positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging study of the amygdala reveals that low levels of the enzyme aromatase, which catalyzes estrogen biosynthesis, are associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and lower self-control, as measured by a standard personality test. (2020-08-31)

Scientists show how brain flexibility emerges in infants
Cognitive flexibility, which refers to the brain's ability to switch between mental processes in response to external stimuli and different task demands, seems to begin developing during the first two years of life, which is much earlier than previously thought. UNC BRIC researchers led by Weili Lin, PhD, used magnetic resonance imaging techniques to show the emergence of a functional flexible brain during early infancy. (2020-08-31)

Unravelling the potential of the unconscious mind
By using a combination of artificial intelligence and brain imaging technology, researchers have discovered that humans can be trained to rationally use the unconscious contents of their mental processes. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, could open the way to important new approaches in neuroscience and artificial intelligence, but also lead to novel applications in clinical, educational or social settings. (2020-08-27)

Why 'one day at a time' works for recovering alcoholics
''One day at a time'' is a mantra for recovering alcoholics, for whom each day without a drink builds the strength to go on to the next. A new brain imaging study by Yale researchers shows why the approach works. (2020-08-27)

New form of brain analysis engages whole brain for the first time
A new method of brain imaging analysis offers the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of noninvasive brain stimulation treatment for Alzheimer's, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and other conditions. (2020-08-26)

New therapy targets breast cancer metastases in brain
When breast cancer spreads to the brain, the prognosis is grim. Patients only have about six months to live. Women with HER2-positive breast cancer tend to develop brain metastases in up to 55% of cases. Chemotherapy drugs targeting breast cancer cells in the brain aren't effective, because they can't cross the blood-brain-barrier. But a new combination therapy targeting breast cancer tumors in the brain dramatically decreased tumor size and increased survival in a preclinical study. (2020-08-26)

Scientists prove SARS-CoV-2 potential to infect human brain organoids
SARS-CoV-2 can infect human neural progenitor cells and brain organoids, as shown by researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators from The University of Hong Kong (HKU). (2020-08-25)

Discovering the mechanism of brain vascular pathfinding during development
A research team led by Dr. DU Jiulin of the Institute of Neuroscience, Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology (CEBSIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, has revealed that Ca2+ activities mediated by mechanosensitive Piezo1 channels regulate the pathfinding of growing brain vessels in larval zebrafish. (2020-08-21)

Brain remapping dysfunction causes spatial memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease
A research group elucidated the brain circuit mechanism that cause of spatial memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease.In the future, improving brain remapping function may reverse spatial memory impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease. (2020-08-19)

Machine learning, meet human emotions: How to help a computer monitor your mental state
An international team of scientists has tested state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms for the challenging tasks of determining the mental workload and affective states of a human brain. Their software can help design smarter brain-computer interfaces for applications in medicine and beyond. In the next steps, researchers plan to use more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) methods, especially deep learning, which allow us to detect very tiny changes in brain signals or brain patterns. (2020-08-19)

Using personal frequency to control brain activity
Individual frequency can be used to specifically influence certain areas of the brain and thus the abilities processed in them - solely by electrical stimulation on the scalp, without any surgical intervention. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have now demonstrated this for the first time. (2020-08-17)

The missing piece of the brain's multitasking network
Multitasking performance stems from the speed of information exchange between inner and outer regions of the brain, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-08-17)

A new neurofeedback strategy to treat pain
Researchers in Japan and Cambridge have developed a new neurofeedback strategy that might help to treat patients who suffer from chronic pain in the future. They have shown that they can use neurofeedback to boost the brain's natural ability to control pain, in a simple procedure in which people lie in a brain scanner and have their brain activity decoded using AI techniques. (2020-08-13)

Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper. (2020-08-13)

KIST finds a strong correlation between ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation treatment and brain waves
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team led, by Dr. Hyungmin Kim at the Center for Bionics, Biomedical Research Institute of the KIST, found a strong correlation between a ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation method for treating damaged brain and a change in delta waves, which is a type of brain waves. (2020-08-12)

The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party
The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows. (2020-08-10)

Body weight has surprising, alarming impact on brain function
Amsterdam and Costa Mesa, CA, August 5, 2020 - As a person's weight goes up, all regions of the brain go down in activity and blood flow, according to a new brain imaging study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-08-05)

How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his problem -- and thus cut the wires. (2020-08-04)

Energy demands limit our brains' information processing capacity
Our brains have an upper limit on how much they can process at once due to a constant but limited energy supply, according to a new UCL study using a brain imaging method that measures cellular metabolism. (2020-08-03)

An averted glance gives a glimpse of the mind behind the eyes
Shakespeare once wrote that the ''eyes are the window to your soul.'' But scientists have found it challenging to peer into the brain to see how it derives meaning from a look into another's eyes. Psychologists at Yale and Harvard have now found a new way to study this mystery by examining the universal and embarrassing tendency to avert one's gaze when caught looking at someone else. (2020-08-03)

Epilepsy: International researchers propose better seizure classification
A new ''mathematical language'' to classify seizures in epilepsy could lead to more effective clinical practice, researchers from Europe, the US, Australia and Japan propose in a new publication in eLife. An epilepsy model developed by the Human Brain Project provides the basis for the novel framework, which could also push forward basic understanding of the disease. (2020-07-31)

Your brain parasite isn't making you sick -- here's why
The new discovery could have important implications for brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune disorders. (2020-07-30)

A centerpiece of EBRAINS' human brain atlas is presented in 'Science'
'Julich-Brain' is the name of the first 3D-atlas of the human brain that reflects the variability of the brain's structure with microscopic resolution. (2020-07-30)

Your brain on birth control
Millions of women have been taking oral contraceptives, but little is known about whether the synthetic hormones found in the oral contraceptives have behavioural and neurophysiological effects, especially during puberty and early adolescence, which are critical periods of brain development. A uOttawa team of researchers found that oral contraceptive use is related to significant structural changes in brain regions implicated in memory and emotional processing. It also alters stress reactivity. (2020-07-28)

Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)

New approach simultaneously measures EEG and fMRI connectomes
Researchers have developed a new approach to compare changes in neural communication using electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging simultaneously. The approach allows them to assess the association between the two measurements and better understand neural connectivity changes over time. (2020-07-23)

Different from a computer: Why the brain never processes the same input in the same way
The brain never processes the same information in the same way. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) have found out why this is the case and how it works. A decisive role plays a critical state of the neuronal networks. (2020-07-23)

Rely on gut feeling? New research identifies how second brain in gut communicates
You're faced with a big decision so your second brain provides what's normally referred to as 'gut instinct', but how did this sensation reach you before it was too late? In a new study in the eNeuro journal, Professor Nick Spencer's laboratory has identified a particular type of neuron in the gut wall that communicates signals to other neurons near the spinal cord and up to the brain. (2020-07-23)

New role for white blood cells in the developing brain
Whether white blood cells can be found in the brain has been controversial, and their role there a complete mystery. In a study published in Cell, an international team from the Babraham Institute, UK & VIB-KU Leuven, Belgium describe a population of specialised brain-resident immune cells discovered in the mouse and human brain, and show that the presence of white blood cells is essential for normal brain development in mice. (2020-07-22)

Antibiotics disrupt development of the 'social brain' in mice
Antibiotic treatment in early life impedes brain signalling pathways that function in social behaviour and pain regulation in mice, a new study by Dr Katerina Johnson and Dr Philip Burnet has found. It was published today in BMC Neuroscience. (2020-07-22)

Study shows how our brains remain active during familiar, repetitive tasks
New research, based on earlier results in mice, suggests that our brains are never at rest, even when we are not learning anything about the world around us. (2020-07-14)

Scientists find new link between delirium and brain energy disruption
Scientists have discovered a new link between impaired brain energy metabolism and delirium -- a disorienting and distressing disorder particularly common in the elderly and one that is currently occurring in a large proportion of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The research suggests that therapies focusing on brain energy metabolism may offer new routes to mitigating delirium. (2020-07-14)

How to map brain connections using DNA barcodes
Detailed wiring diagrams--connectomes--for the brain are critical for understanding brain development, function, and disease. CSHL scientists found a way to use a large set of short snippets of DNA to label neurons, increasing the number of paths that can be traced in a single experiment versus other brain mapping techniques. (2020-07-14)

Researcher develops method for mapping brain cell change, development in mice
Penn State researchers have developed a new method for studying key moments in brain development. Yongsoo Kim, assistant professor of neural and behavioral sciences at Penn State College of Medicine, is using the method to understand how oxytocin receptor expression changes in normally developing mice and mouse models of autism spectrum disorder. (2020-07-13)

No association found between exposure to mobile devices and brain volume alterations in adolescents
New study of 2,500 Dutch children is the first to explore the relationship between brain volume and different doses of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (2020-07-09)

How fear transforms into anxiety
University of New Mexico researchers identify for the first time the brain-wide neural correlates of the transition from fear to anxiety. (2020-07-09)

Feeling with the heart
A person's sensitivity to external stimuli depends not only on the state of their nervous system, but also on their cardiac cycle. Usually we do not notice our heartbeat, paying attention to it only in unusual situations, such as in moments of excitement before a performance or while experiencing arrhythmia. The brain actively suppresses the perception of our heartbeat, but as a result, our perception of other sensory stimuli may also be affected. (2020-07-09)

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