Current Bridge News and Events

Current Bridge News and Events, Bridge News Articles.
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Researchers create novel photonic chip
Researchers at the George Washington University and University of California, Los Angeles, have developed and demonstrated for the first time a photonic digital to analog converter without leaving the optical domain. Such novel converters can advance next-generation data processing hardware with high relevance for data centers, 6G networks, artificial intelligence and more. (2021-02-02)

Electron transfer discovery is a step toward viable grid-scale batteries
The way to boost electron transfer in grid-scale batteries is different than researchers had believed, a new study from the University of Michigan has shown. (2021-01-21)

Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
Researchers captured and comparted hi-res images of ribosome structures from sensitive and resistant bacteria and report that a water molecule needed for antibiotic binding was not present in the ribosomes from the drug-resistant bugs. (2021-01-19)

Experiments first verify distributed quantum phase estimation
Professor PAN Jianwei and his colleges from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have achieved the experimental verification of distribution quantum phase estimation for the first time. This work was published on Nature Photonics. (2020-12-21)

Researchers rank various mask protection, modifications against COVID-19
Some people still refuse to wear a mask during a viral pandemic. So UNC School of Medicine scientists, in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency, researched the protectiveness of various kinds of consumer-grade and modified masks, assuming the mask wearer was exposed to the virus, like when we interact with an unmasked infected person. (2020-12-11)

Out with the old, in with the new
UVA Engineering Discovery Challenges Heat Transfer Paradigm That Guides Electronic and Photonic Device Design. (2020-12-09)

USC-led researchers develop new way to watch pancreatic cells package insulin
For first time, scientists peer deeply within cells that make insulin, a new way to study diabetes to advance drugs for the disease. (2020-12-09)

Stretchable micro-supercapacitors to self-power wearable devices
A stretchable system that can harvest energy from human breathing and motion for use in wearable health-monitoring devices may be possible, according to an international team of researchers, led by Huanyu ''Larry'' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in Penn State's Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics. (2020-12-08)

COVID-19 pandemic health disparities and pediatric health care
Telehealth is a vital strategy to bridge pediatric physical and mental health care gaps, potentially reducing health care disparities. (2020-12-07)

Bridges between villages in Nicaragua serve as links to markets
Yale Economic Growth Center researcher Kevin Donovan and coauthor find that building footbridges positively affects rural economies in flood-prone areas. (2020-11-30)

A growth mindset of interest can spark innovative thinking
Researchers from Yale-NUS College find that viewing interests as developable, not fixed, can help people make connections among diverse fields that others might miss, with implications for innovation. Their research suggests that understanding this can benefit organisations in generating innovative solutions and ideas, job seekers taking on new or wide-ranging responsibilities, and can create a culture for interdisciplinary learning and problem-solving. (2020-11-25)

Army, MIT explore materials for transforming robots made of robots
Scientists from the US Army and MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms created a new way to link materials with unique mechanical properties, opening up the possibility of future military robots made of robots. (2020-11-19)

Controversy continues over '13 Reasons Why' and adolescent suicide
A new pair of commentaries in PLOS ONE debate a reanalysis of data concerning adolescent suicide and the Netflix series ''13 Reasons Why.'' Although a 2019 study found a contagion effect among boys, an Annenberg Public Policy Center reanalysis concluded that, to the contrary, the series had no clear effect. The author of the reanalysis stands by his work. (2020-11-18)

Physics can assist with key challenges in artificial intelligence
Two challenges in the field of artificial intelligence have been solved by adopting a physical concept introduced a century ago to describe the formation of a magnet during a process of iron bulk cooling. Using a careful optimization procedure and exhaustive simulations, researchers have demonstrated the usefulness of the physical concept of power-law scaling to deep learning. This central concept in physics has also been found to be applicable in AI, and especially deep learning. (2020-11-12)

A malformation illustrates the incredible plasticity of the brain
One in 4,000 people is born without a corpus callosum, a brain structure consisting of neural fibres that are used to transfer information between hemisphere. 25% of them do not have any symptoms. Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva discovered that when the neuronal fibres that act as a bridge between the hemispheres are missing, the brain reorganises itself and creates an impressive number of connections inside each hemisphere, recreating connections using alternative neural pathways. (2020-10-30)

Bridges with limb-inspired architecture can withstand earthquakes, cut repair costs
Structural damage to any of the nation's ailing bridges can come with a hefty price of billions of dollars in repairs. New bridge designs promise more damage-resistant structures and, consequently, lower restoration costs. But if these designs haven't been implemented in the real world, predicting how they can be damaged and what repair strategies should be implemented remain unresolved. (2020-10-26)

Smart cells: Chemists develop tool with potential to treat illness at the cellular level
New research by an international team of chemists describes a new type of artificial cell that can communicate with other cells within the body--with potential applications in the field of smart pharmaceuticals. (2020-09-22)

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat
New heat-harnessing 'solar' cells that reflect 99% of the energy they can't convert to electricity could help bring down the price of storing renewable energy as heat, as well as harvesting waste heat from exhaust pipes and chimneys. (2020-09-21)

Project Phoenix: DNA unlocks a new understanding of coral
A new study challenges more than 200 years of coral classification. Researchers say the 'traditional' method does not accurately capture the differences between species or their evolutionary relationships. They developed a new genetic tool to help better understand and ultimately work to save coral reefs. (2020-09-14)

Mathematical modeling revealed how chitinase, a molecular monorail, obeys a one-way sign
A novel mathematical modeling method has been developed to estimate operation models of biomolecular motors from single-molecule imaging data of motion with the Bayesian inference framework. The operation mechanism of a linear molecular motor ''chitinase'', which moves one-way on a chitin chain with degrading the chain passed by, was elucidated by mathematical modeling of experimental imaging data with the method. (2020-08-03)

Double surgery improves chances for heart transplant in patients with obesity
Pairing bariatric surgery with LVAD heart surgery may be an effective bridge to heart transplant for obese patients. (2020-07-27)

Designing DNA from scratch: Engineering the functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have constructed ''DNA droplets'' comprising designed DNA nanostructures. The droplets exhibit dynamic functions such as fusion, fission, Janus-shape formation, and protein capture. Their technique is expected to be applicable to a wide variety of biomaterials, opening doors to many promising applications in materials design, drug delivery, and even artificial cell-like molecular systems. (2020-07-15)

RNA key in helping stem cells know what to become
If every cell has the same genetic blueprint, why does an eye cell look and act so differently than a brain cell or skin cell? In a new study published this week, researchers come one step closer to solving this mystery, showing RNA plays a critical role. (2020-07-07)

New research leads to lighter and greener bridges
A recently completed research project revealed the potential for reducing material used for a suspension bridge deck by more than 25 per cent -- meaning a saving of up to 30 per cent of CO2 emissions. (2020-06-03)

HKU super steel project attains major breakthrough
The Super Steel project led by Professor Huang Mingxin at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), with collaborators at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), has made important breakthrough in its new super D&P steel (produced using a new deformed and partitioned method) to greatly enhance its fracture resistance while maintaining super strong in strength for advanced industrial applications. (2020-05-12)

Financial incentives boost doctor training in opioid treatment medication
Offering $750 to emergency medicine physicians exponentially increased those trained to prescribe buprenorphine. (2020-05-05)

Researchers rebuild the bridge between neuroscience and artificial intelligence
In an article in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers reveal that they have successfully rebuilt the bridge between experimental neuroscience and advanced artificial intelligence learning algorithms. Conducting new types of experiments on neuronal cultures, the researchers were able to demonstrate a new accelerated brain-inspired learning mechanism. When the mechanism was utilized on the artificial task of handwritten digit recognition, for instance, its success rates substantially outperformed commonly-used machine learning algorithms. (2020-04-23)

Co-delivery of IL-10 and NT-3 to enhance spinal cord injury repair
Spinal cord injury (SCI) creates a complex microenvironment that is not conducive to repair; growth factors are in short supply, whereas factors that inhibit regeneration are plentiful. In a new report, researchers have developed a structural bridge material that simultaneously stimulates IL-10 and NT-3 expression using a single bi-cistronic vector to alter the microenvironment and enhance repair. (2020-04-17)

Single cell division error may be responsible for complexity in cancer genomes
A single error in cell division related to the formation of a chromosome bridge can trigger a cascade of mutational events, rapidly generating many of the defining features of cancer genomes, a new study suggests. (2020-04-16)

Risk aversion as a survival strategy in ants
Ants are excellent navigators and always find their way back to the nest. But how do they react when an obstacle or a predator blocks their path? An international team including Antoine Wystrach, a CNRS researcher has shown that ants are capable of changing their familiar route to avoid traps thanks to an aversive learning mechanism: by associating visual cues with negative experiences, they can memorize potentially dangerous routes. (2020-04-09)

New Cas9 variant makes genome editing even more precise
Researchers develop more specific CRISPR-Cas9 gene scissors. (2020-03-03)

Tiny 'bridges' help particles stick together
Understanding how particles bind together has implications for everything from the likelihood a riverbank will erode to the mechanism by which a drug works in the body. A team from the University of Pennsylvania found that particle size matters more than other properties in determining how strongly they stick together. (2020-02-04)

Synthetic nerve conduit bridges the gap in arm nerve repair
A team of scientists has created a biodegradable, synthetic conduit that repairs large gaps in injured nerves, which supported recovery and accelerated neuronal healing in a macaque model. (2020-01-22)

No clear evidence of increase in adolescent suicide after '13 Reasons Why'
Contrary to the findings of a 2019 study that associated the release of the Netflix series '13 Reasons Why' with an increase in monthly suicide rates among adolescent boys, a reanalysis of the data by the Annenberg Public Policy Center finds no evidence of contagion. The reanalysis, published today in PLOS ONE, found that after controlling for the dramatic increase in adolescent suicide in recent years, the show's release had no clear effect. (2020-01-16)

Study of patients on heart pumps debunks myths about categories and outcomes
Findings led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital could lead to a major change in thinking around adjudication of left-ventricular assist devices (LVADs) into discrete categories. (2020-01-15)

APS Tip Sheet: Trudging until take-off
Allowing slower airplane passengers to board first decreases total boarding time. (2020-01-08)

Bridge protection in catastrophic earthquakes
Bridges are the most vulnerable parts of a transport network when earthquakes occur, obstructing emergency response, search and rescue missions and aid delivery, increasing potential fatalities. (2019-12-09)

Corals survive to tell the tale of Earth's newest island eruption
Coral reefs on a tiny island in the South Pacific have shown incredible resilience and recovery from a recent but very severe disturbance: a volcanic eruption that created a new island. (2019-12-08)

Subtle changes, big effects
According to the chaos theory in mathematics, a minute change such as the 'flap of a butterfly's wing' could cause huge changes elsewhere. This seems to hold true at much smaller scales too--for example, within a cell. Scientists from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, have now found how a minuscule atomic change in a protein molecule enables the bacterium to shut down its host's immune signaling system. (2019-11-18)

Living bridges
Dense, humid broadleaf forests, monsoon-swollen rivers and deep ravines -- in the Indian state of Meghalaya wooden bridges easily decay or are washed away in floodwaters. Bridges made from steel and concrete are pushed to their limits here as well. But bridges made of living tree roots can survive here for centuries. Prof. Ferdinand Ludwig of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has investigated these special structures and proposes integrating this extraordinary building technique in modern architecture. (2019-11-18)

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