Current British Throne News and Events

Current British Throne News and Events, British Throne News Articles.
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50 years since decimalisation: A very British compromise
February 15 2021 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the United Kingdom's switch to using decimal currency, and researcher Andy Cook has looked into this often-overlooked historical event for his PhD with the University of Huddersfield. (2021-02-12)

New guidance on how cardiac patients with diabetes can exercise more safely
Cardiac patients who also have diabetes will be able to do their rehabilitation exercises more safely, thanks to the world's first guidance on the subject, which has been published by international experts including a Swansea University academic. The guidance will be a crucial resource for healthcare professionals, so they can help the growing number of cardiac rehabilitation patients who also have diabetes. (2021-02-04)

New study strengthens claims Richard III murdered 'the Princes in the Tower
King Richard III's involvement in one of the most notorious and emotive mysteries in English history may be a step closer to being confirmed following a new study by Professor Tim Thornton of the University of Huddersfield. (2021-02-01)

The important role of pharmacists for older adults' health
Pharmacists play an important role in managing medication-based therapies for older community-dwelling patients, according to a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2021-01-21)

Study suggests that gut fungi are not associated with Parkinson's disease
The bacterial gut microbiome is strongly associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), but no studies had previously investigated he role of fungi in the gut. In this novel study published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, a team of investigators at the University of British Columbia examined whether the fungal constituents of the gut microbiome are associated with PD. (2021-01-21)

BAME parliamentary candidates not picked to fight 'winnable seats' in areas with less tolerance towa
Political parties are increasingly likely to avoid selecting ethnic minority candidates for 'winnable' constituencies at General Elections in areas where there are less tolerant attitudes toward diversity, research suggests. (2021-01-11)

Mental health of UK women, ethnic minorities especially affected during pandemic
In the UK, men from ethnic minorities and women may have experienced worse mental health declines than White British men, according to a study published January 6, 2021 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Eugenio Proto and Climent Quintana-Domeque of institutions including the University of Glasgow and the University of Exeter, UK. (2021-01-06)

Identifying Canada's key conservation hot spots highlights problem
To stop biodiversity loss, Canada recently committed to protecting 30% of its land and sea by 2030. But making conservation decisions about where to locate new protected areas is complicated. It depends on data both about biodiversity and about a range of benefits (e.g. freshwater, climate regulation, recreation) that people get from nature. Despite the size of the country, new mapping suggests that less than 1% of Canada's land is a hot spot, providing all these benefits in one place. (2021-01-05)

BAME babies at highest risk of Vitamin D deficiency
A third of all babies and half of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) babies are vitamin D deficient, a large study of 3000 newborn's in the West Midlands has shown. (2020-12-16)

Predicting British railway delays using artificial intelligence
Over the past 20 years, the number of passengers traveling on British train networks has almost doubled to 1.7 billion annually. With numbers like that it's clear that people rely on rail service in Great Britain, and how many disgruntled patrons there would be when delays occur. A recent study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used British Railway data and an artificial intelligence model to improve the ability to predict delays in railway networks. (2020-12-10)

Researchers call for clarity on the definition of medicine misuse
A recent analysis of published studies provides a comprehensive overview of the terms and definitions used to characterize medicine misuse. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-09)

Southern Hemisphere westerly winds likely to intensify as climate warms
Polar climate scientists have created the most high resolution past record of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds. The results, published this week (9 December) in the journal Communications Earth and Environment, describe how the winds are likely to intensify and migrate poleward as the climate warms. The study highlights the urgent need for better models to predict the future. (2020-12-09)

New study suggests indigenous practices can help revitalize pacific salmon fisheries
Across the North Pacific, salmon fisheries are struggling with climate variability, declining fish populations, and a lack of sustainable fishing opportunities. According to a study published today in BioScience from a team of Indigenous leaders and conservation scientists, help lies in revitalizing Indigenous fishing practices and learning from Indigenous systems of salmon management. (2020-12-09)

Study identifies links between atopic dermatitis and autoimmune diseases
In a recent study published in the British Journal of Dermatology, individuals with atopic dermatitis, or eczema, were more likely to also have various autoimmune diseases, especially those involving the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, or the connective tissue. (2020-12-07)

People with rare autoimmune diseases at increased risk of dying during COVID-19 pandemic
A new study, led by experts from the University of Nottingham, has shown that people with rare autoimmune rheumatic diseases are at a greater risk of dying at a younger age during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-12-03)

What's killing killer whales?
Pathology reports on more than 50 killer whales stranded over nearly a decade in the northeast Pacific and Hawaii show that orcas face a variety of mortal threats -- many stemming from human interactions. (2020-12-02)

New genus of chimaerid fish classified with help from Kazan University expert
A dental plate was found by Canadian national Stephen Suntok on the Pacific coast of British Columbia. Evgeny Popov, a renowned expert in chimaerids, was asked to assist in classification. (2020-11-05)

Safety of HPV vaccines in males
A new analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology shows that HPV vaccines are safe and well tolerated in the male population, and the side effects that may occur after immunization are similar in both sexes. (2020-11-04)

Mathematical modeling of processes in neurons to assist the treatment of epilepsy and depression
Researchers study the effect of neural stimulation by ultrasonic waves and analyzing the influence of ultrasonic wave parameters on the excitation of electrical signals in the nerves. The obtained results have a great practical value for further studies related to the issues of human brain modeling. (2020-11-02)

Glomerular diseases linked to higher risk of cardiovascular conditions
Adults with glomerular diseases have a 2.5-times higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than individuals in the general population. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-22)

Cholesterol medications linked to lower cancer-related deaths in women
Among women with breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or melanoma, those who were taking cholesterol-lowering medications, were less likely to die from cancer, according to an analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-10-21)

Promising breath-test for cancer
The global quest to use a person's breath analysis for rapid, inexpensive and accurate early-stage testing for cancer and other diseases has taken a leap forward. In a new paper in the British Journal of Cancer, Flinders University researchers have reported significant progress in developing a method to test exhaled breath profiles which accurately differentiate head and neck cancer from non-cancer patients. (2020-10-05)

Why have fewer long-term care residents died from COVID-19 in BC than Ontario?
An analysis comparing COVID-19 deaths in long-term care (LTC) residents in Ontario and British Columbia found that BC was better prepared for the pandemic and responded in a more coordinated and decisive manner, leading to far fewer deaths than in Ontario. The article is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2020/09/29/cmaj.201860. (2020-09-30)

Friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced COVID-19 prejudice
A new study finds that friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced Covid-19 prejudice as the virus hit the UK back in February. At the time, opinion polls suggested that one in three Brits already saw the virus as a personal threat and the British press were reporting a rise in hate crimes towards Chinese people. Researchers studied how UK residents felt towards the Chinese community as the pandemic reached our shores, and how these feelings might relate to British support for anti-Chinese policies. (2020-09-27)

Invasive shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion
Researchers have identified an invasive blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia's Calvert Island. The discovery represents the northern-most record of the parasite on the West Coast and is likely an indication of its ability to spread without human transport. (2020-09-17)

Canadian researchers identify four barriers to use of 'gold-standard' abortion pill
Canada is the first country to facilitate provision of medical abortion in primary care settings through evidence-based deregulation of mifepristone, which is considered the 'gold standard' for medical abortion. A Canadian study investigated the factors that influence successful initiation and ongoing provision of medical abortion services among Canadian health professionals and how these factors relate to abortion policies, systems and service access throughout the country. (2020-09-15)

Baboon matriarchs enjoy less stress
You know the type: Loud. Swaggering. Pushy. The alpha male clearly runs the show. Female alphas are often less conspicuous than their puffed up male counterparts, but holding the top spot still has its perks. Now, a study of female baboons points to another upside to being No. 1. A Duke University-led study of 237 female baboons in Kenya found that alphas have significantly lower levels of glucocorticoids, hormones produced in response to stress. (2020-09-09)

Hair dye and cancer risk: Largest study yet
Studies have indicated that people who dye their hair regularly may have a higher risk of cancer, especially bladder cancer and breast cancer. Hair dyes contain certain chemicals that have been held responsible for these relationships. In the largest study to date, which followed 117,200 women from the USA over 36 years, this could not be confirmed. (2020-09-03)

Relatives in deep grief can be helped earlier
Many relatives who experience severe long-term grief reactions after bereavement have more frequent contact with their general practitioner already prior to bereavement, as well as a higher consumption of antidepressants and sedatives than those who have fewer critical symptoms of grief over time. This suggests that it may be possible to prevent this by catching this group earlier. This is shown by a new research result from Aarhus University. (2020-09-01)

Atlantic sturgeon in the king's pantry -- unique discovery in Baltic sea wreck from 1495
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now reveal what the Danish King Hans had planned to offer when laying claim to the Swedish throne in 1495: A two-metre-long Atlantic sturgeon. The well-preserved fish remains were found in a wreck on the bottom of the Baltic Sea last year, and species identification was made possible through DNA analysis. (2020-08-27)

Illicit fentanyl, stimulants found in majority of overdose deaths in BC
Nonprescribed fentanyl and stimulants were the primary contributors to overdose mortality, while few people had prescribed opioids in their systems, according to new toxicology research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200191. (2020-08-24)

Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space
A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird. (2020-08-04)

Markerless motion capture technology could help skeleton athletes' training
Researchers from CAMERA at the University of Bath have developed the first non-invasive way of measuring athletes' push start performance. (2020-07-21)

Socio-economic status predicts UK boys' development of essential thinking skills
A comparison of children in Hong Kong, mainland China and the UK has found that British boys' development of key thinking skills, known as 'executive functions', is unusually reliant on their socio-economic status. (2020-07-20)

Scientists identify new species of sea sponge off the coast of British Columbia, Canada
A UAlberta research team has published a study on the discovery of a new sponge that is abundant in the region, making up nearly 20 per cent of the live sponges in the reefs off the coast of British Columbia. The new species--called Desmacella hyalina -- was discovered using an underwater robot that travelled along the ocean floor, surveying reefs and collecting samples. (2020-07-16)

No evidence that predator control will save mountain caribou, study says
Addressing potential threats from predators has not slowed the dramatic decline of mountain caribou in British Columbia and Alberta, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Alberta and two other western Canadian universities. (2020-07-14)

Study calls for action to protect BAME and migrant groups from economic impact of COVID-19
The COVID-19 lockdown has had a disproportionate economic impact on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK, new research, which also calls for racial justice, reveals today. (2020-07-13)

Challenges in evaluating SARS-CoV-2 vaccines
With more than 140 SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in development, the race is on for a successful candidate to help prevent COVID-19. An effective and safe vaccine would be a major advance in the fight against COVID-19. However, there are challenges in evaluating the efficacy of these vaccines during the pandemic, as an analysis article outlines in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-07-09)

Study says inhalers ok to use amid COVID-19 concerns
University of Huddersfield researchers find that the benefits of inhalers for asthma sufferers outweigh the risks of contracting coronavirus, following concerns raised after WHO warned that steroids could reduce immunity. (2020-07-09)

Early clinical trial tests treatment strategy for pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis, and it often goes undetected until advanced stages. A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that a certain cocktail of chemotherapy drugs may be a safe and effective treatment option for patients with a metastatic form of the disease. (2020-07-08)

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