Current Broccoli News and Events

Current Broccoli News and Events, Broccoli News Articles.
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Ultimately, beneficial fungi could be more effective than pesticides against nematodes
Over the past 30 years, the use of soil fumigants and nematicides used to protect cole crops, such as broccoli and Brussel sprouts, against cyst nematode pathogens in coastal California fields has decreased dramatically. A survey of field samples in 2016 indicated the nematode population has also decreased, suggesting the existence of a natural cyst nematode controlling process in these fields. (2021-02-04)

Feed Fido fresh human-grade dog food to scoop less poop
For decades, kibble has been our go-to diet for dogs. But the dog food marketplace has exploded in recent years, with grain-free, fresh, and now human-grade offerings crowding the shelves. All commercial dog foods must meet standards for complete and balanced nutrition, so how do consumers know what to choose? (2021-02-03)

More turkey dinners for people with celiac disease?
An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that tryptophan, an amino acid present in high amounts in turkey, along with some probiotics, may help them heal and respond better to a gluten-free diet (2020-10-21)

New interactive tool will help farmers contain the spread of clubroot
'ClubrootTracker is an interactive tool that will help farmers locate clubroot-infected areas and can be used by farmers, researchers, and industry and government representatives to share the clubroot status of their land,' explained Edel Pérez-López, one of the plant pathologists involved in the development of this tool. 'We believe that the ClubrootTracker will be a gamechanger on the management of clubroot disease both in Canada and worldwide.' (2020-09-28)

Some of America's favorite produce crops may need to get a move on by 2045
New research from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows that by the years 2045-2049 future temperatures will have more of an effect on when cool-season crops, such as broccoli and lettuce, can be grown than on where, while for warm-season crops (cantaloupe, tomatoes, carrots) the impact will be greater for where they can be grown versus when. (2020-08-25)

Broccoli and Brussels sprouts a cut above for blood vessel health
New research from Edith Cowan University has shown some of our least favourite vegetables could be the most beneficial when it comes to preventing advanced blood vessel disease. (2020-08-20)

Neuromarketing of taste
Marina Domracheva and Sofya Kulikova, researchers from HSE University's campus in Perm, have discovered a new approach to analyse the perceived similarity of food products, based on electroencephalography (EEG) signals. They note that the power of gamma oscillations can reflect similarities in a cross-modal approach. Their paper was published in the journal Food Quality and Preference. (2020-06-26)

Beyond the garnish: Will a new type of produce get the microgreen light?
Microgreens. They're leafy green vegetables that are relatively new to the dining room, but a study by a Colorado State University team indicates that they will be welcome company at the table. (2020-05-28)

Traditional vegetable diet lowers the risk of premature babies
It turns out we should follow our parent' advice when we're thinking about becoming parents ourselves, with a study finding eating the traditional 'three-vegies' before pregnancy lowers the risk of a premature birth. (2020-04-14)

Adequate folate levels linked to lower cardiovascular mortality risk in RA patients
Decreased folate levels in the bloodstream have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, shedding light on why those patients are more susceptible to heart and vascular disease, according to research published today in JAMA Network Open by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-02-26)

How plants in the cabbage family look inward when sulfur is scarce
Studying genetically modified model plants from the cabbage family, researchers at Kyushu University found that disrupting the production of two enzymes in thale cress plants growing in sulfur-deficient environments further stunts growth by reducing their ability to breakdown sulfur-containing glucosinolates. This new insight could one day help shed light on designing strategies for improving the content of health-beneficial glucosinolates in related crops and promoting effective sulfur utilization in modern agriculture. (2020-02-12)

Can chickpea genes save mustard seeds from blight disease?
During visits to fields in Assam, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, India, plant biologists Muthappa Senthil-Kumar and Urooj Fatima found mustard plants infested with Alternaria blight disease. They also noticed that an adjacent field of chickpeas were completely uninfected. (2020-01-29)

'Locally grown' broccoli looks, tastes better to consumers
In tests, consumers in upstate New York were willing to pay more for broccoli grown in New York when they knew where it came from, Cornell University researchers found. (2019-12-17)

Unlikely wasp enemy of a serious alien pest in North America named Idris elba
Idris is a worldwide genus of microscopic, parasitic wasps. A new species of Idris from Mexico (Guanajuato) and the United States (California, New Mexico) proved to be an unlikely enemy of the invasive bagrada bug, a major pest of various crops, including cruciferous vegetables. Described in the peer-reviewed, open-access Journal of Hymenoptera Research, this species is given the name 'elba,' making its name identical to that of British movie star Idris Elba. (2019-11-18)

Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance
Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children. (2019-09-09)

Suggested move to plant-based diets risks worsening brain health nutrient deficiency
The momentum behind a move to plant-based and vegan diets for the good of the planet is commendable, but risks worsening an already low intake of an essential nutrient involved in brain health, warns a nutritionist in the online journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health. (2019-08-29)

Apples, tea and moderation -- the 3 ingredients for a long life
Consuming flavonoid-rich items such as apples and tea protects against cancer and heart disease, particularly for smokers and heavy drinkers, according to new research. (2019-08-13)

With bitter foods, what you eat determines what you like to eat
Introducing plant-based foods to a diet is a common-sense approach to healthy eating, but many people don't like the taste of vegetables, bitter greens, in particular. But give that broccoli a chance. Doing so won't just change your mind; it will actually change the taste of those foods, according to a new UB study. (2019-07-24)

Garlic on broccoli: A smelly approach to repel a major pest
New University of Vermont study offers a novel framework to test strategies for managing invasive pests. Applying the framework to swede midge, a new invasive fly causing 100% crop losses for organic broccoli growers, the researchers uncover which odors are most effective at repelling the pest. (2019-07-23)

Mustering a milder mustard
Cruciferous vegetables -- the mustards, broccolis and cabbages of the world -- share a distinct taste. But the same compounds that make them bitter also make them toxic at some levels. Biologists have mapped the crystal structure of a key protein that makes the metabolites responsible for the bitter taste in Brassicas. A study published this month in the journal The Plant Cell is the first snapshot of how the protein evolved and came to churn out such diverse byproducts in this agriculturally significant group of plants. (2019-07-11)

Low vitamin K levels linked to mobility limitation and disability in older adults
Tufts University researchers led the first study to evaluate the association between biomarkers of vitamin K status and mobility limitation and disability, and found older adults with low levels of circulating vitamin K were more likely to develop these conditions. (2019-06-13)

Warming waters in western tropical Pacific may affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet
Warming waters in the western tropical Pacific Ocean have significantly increased thunderstorms and rainfall, which may affect the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and global sea-level rise, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2019-06-13)

Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor
Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables -- the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, Brussels sprouts and kale -- contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers. A new study demonstrates that targeting the gene, known as WWP1, with the ingredient found in broccoli suppressed tumor growth in cancer-prone lab animals. (2019-05-16)

Broccoli sprout compound may restore brain chemistry imbalance linked to schizophrenia
In a series of recently published studies using animals and people, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have further characterized a set of chemical imbalances in the brains of people with schizophrenia related to the chemical glutamate. And they figured out how to tweak the level using a compound derived from broccoli sprouts. (2019-05-08)

Are buyers willing to forgo quality in locally grown produce?
Phillip Coles, professor of practice in management at Lehigh University, is among researchers who found that East Coast buyers aren't willing to forgo quality when it comes to local broccoli varieties. (2019-04-29)

Tuck into colourful fruits and vegetables and see the light
A $5.7 billion global medical bill to restore sight for the estimated 45 million people with cataracts could be slashed in half by a diet rich in colourful fruits and vegetables, according to an international study. (2019-03-24)

Food safety: Dung beetles and soil bacteria reduce risk of human pathogens
Food safety regulations increasingly pressure growers to remove hedgerows, ponds and other natural habitats from farms to keep out pathogen-carrying wildlife and livestock. Yet, this could come at the cost of biodiversity. New research published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology encourages the presence of dung beetles and soil bacteria at farms as they naturally suppress E. coli and other harmful pathogens before spreading to humans. (2019-03-19)

Detecting cyanide exposure
Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke -- or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now, in an animal study in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers report a new precise and accurate biomarker of cyanide exposure. (2019-02-27)

Biotechnology to the rescue of Brussels sprouts
An international team has identified the genes that make these plants resistant to the pathogen that attacks crops belonging to the cabbage family all over the world. (2019-02-04)

South African-Scottish research team demonstrate fractal light from lasers
Reporting this month in Physical Review A, a Wits University research team provide the first experimental evidence for fractal light from simple lasers and add a new prediction, that the fractal light should exist in 3D and not just 2D as previously thought. (2019-01-30)

Carrots or candy bars? Context shapes choice of healthy foods
Pop quiz: Given a choice between indulgent and healthy foods, what will most people pick? The answer may depend on what foods sit nearby on the grocery shelf, suggests new Duke University research. Paradoxically, the nearby presence of an indulgent treat such as Snickers or Oreos can cause more people to opt for a healthy food, such as salmon or grapefruit, said study co-author Scott Huettel. Context, in other words, affects food choices. (2019-01-09)

Folate deficiency creates hitherto unknown problems in connection with cell division
Folate deficiency creates more problems in connection with DNA replication than researchers had hitherto assumed, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show in a new study. Once a person lacks folate, the damage caused by this cannot be reversed. The researchers therefore encourage people to be more aware of the level of folate in the blood. (2018-12-14)

Drug for pancreatic cancer developed by college of pharmacy researchers
University of Houston researchers have developed a new medicine that can inhibit two of the major pathways of pancreatic cancer. The new synthetic compound is based on a type of sea sponge. (2018-09-11)

Chemicals found in vegetables prevent colon cancer in mice
Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a new study from the Francis Crick Institute shows. (2018-08-14)

Compounds in 'monster' radish could help tame cardiovascular disease
Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in the Sakurajima Daikon, or 'monster,' radish could help protect coronary blood vessels and potentially prevent heart disease and stroke. The finding could lead to the discovery of similar substances in other vegetables and perhaps lead to new drug treatments. (2018-08-08)

High fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce risk of breast cancer
Women who eat a high amount of fruits and vegetables each day may have a lower risk of breast cancer, especially of aggressive tumors, than those who eat fewer fruits and vegetables, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2018-07-19)

Researchers find low magnesium levels make vitamin D ineffective
Vitamin D can't be metabolized without sufficient magnesium levels, meaning Vitamin D remains stored and inactive for as many as 50 percent of Americans. In addition, Vitamin D supplements can increase a person's calcium and phosphate levels even while they remain Vitamin D deficient. People may suffer from vascular calcification if their magnesium levels aren't high enough to prevent the complication. (2018-02-26)

Don't blame hurricanes for most big storm surges in northeast
Hurricanes spawn most of the largest storm surges in the northeastern US, right? Wrong, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists. Extratropical cyclones , including nor'easters and other non-tropical storms, generate most of the large storm surges in the Northeast, according to the study in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. They include a freak November 1950 storm and devastating nor'easters in March 1962 and December 1992. (2018-02-15)

Clean plates much more common when we eat at home
When people eat at home, there's typically not much left on their plates - and that means there's likely less going to landfills, according to new research from The Ohio State University. (2018-02-14)

Robotic weeders: to a farm near you?
The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot. Specialty crops such as lettuce, broccoli, tomatoes, and onions may be the first to benefit. (2018-01-10)

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