Current Bromine News and Events

Current Bromine News and Events, Bromine News Articles.
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Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (2021-02-23)

Plastic recycling results in rare metals being found in children's toys and food packaging
Scientists from the University of Plymouth and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tested a range of new and used products - including children's toys, office equipment and cosmetic containers - and found they contained quantities of rare earth elements. (2021-02-17)

Scientists able to see how potential cancer treatment reacts in single cell
Using a 185 metre beamline at the Diamond synchrotron, researchers could see how Osmium, a rare precious metal that could be used for cancer treatments, reacts in a single human lung cancer cell. This is a major step forward in discovering new anti-cancer drugs for researchers at the University of Warwick. (2021-02-17)

Synthesizing valuable chemicals from contaminated soil
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and ETH Zurich have developed a process to produce commodity chemicals in a much less hazardous way than was previously possible. In the current issue of Science, the researchers report that they have been able to utilize electrolysis, i.e., the application of an electric current, to obtain chemicals known as dichloro and dibromo compounds, which can then be used to synthesize commodity chemicals. (2021-01-29)

Reactive halogen from domestic coal burning aggravates winter air pollution
During the winter in the North China Plain, scientists found high concentrations of reactive halogen gases (BrCl, HOBr, Cl2) in the atmosphere which was associated with widespread coal burning in rural areas. Halogen atoms released from BrCl and Cl2 under sunlight significantly increased the oxidative capacity, and has the potential to boost the productions of secondary aerosols - the major components of winter haze in northern China - and the toxic form of mercury. (2021-01-25)

Blue-light stride in perovskite-based LEDs
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed efficient blue light-emitting diodes based on halide perovskites. ''We are very excited about this breakthrough'', says Feng Gao, professor at Linköping University. The new LEDs may open the way to cheap and energy-efficient illumination. (2021-01-13)

Gut microbiome snapshot could reveal chemical exposures in children
Researchers have completed the most comprehensive study to date on how a class of persistent pollutants called semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are associated with the gut microbiome in human children. The results provide a potential mechanism for measuring exposure to a wide variety of these substances and suggests exposure to toxic halogenated compounds may create a niche for bacteria not usually found in the human gut. (2020-12-03)

Lead-free magnetic perovskites
Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, working with the perovskite family of materials have taken a step forwards and developed an optoelectronic magnetic double perovskite. The discovery opens the possibility to couple spintronics with optoelectronics for rapid and energy-efficient information storage. (2020-11-06)

Laundry lint can cause significant tissue damage within marine mussels
Research by the University of Plymouth showed that ingesting lint caused significant abnormality within the mussels' gills, as well as atrophy or deformities leading to loss of definition in digestive tubules (2020-10-02)

How a toxic chromium species could form in drinking water
The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, brought much-needed attention to the problem of potentially toxic metals being released from drinking water distribution pipes when water chemistry changes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have investigated how hexavalent chromium, known as Cr(VI), can form in drinking water when corroded cast iron pipes interact with residual disinfectant. Their findings could suggest new strategies to control Cr(VI) formation in the water supply. (2020-09-30)

CU student helps bridge teams at Clemson
Three teams of researchers at Clemson University have joined forces to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding perovskite nanocrystals, which are semiconductors with numerous applications, including LEDs, lasers, solar cells and photodetectors. (2020-08-20)

New catalyst efficiently turns carbon dioxide into useful fuels and chemicals
By efficiently converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, a new catalyst developed by a team of Brown researchers could potentially aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide. (2020-08-13)

Wheat and couch grass can extract toxic metals from contaminated soils
Irina Shtangeeva is a researcher at the Department of Soil Science and Soil Ecology, St Petersburg University. She has studied the ability of wheat and couch grass to accumulate toxic substances. Both plants were capable of absorbing various chemical elements from contaminated soils. Although the plants were able to accumulate high concentrations of toxicants, they could survive under negative environmental conditions (2020-08-10)

Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties
The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of ScienceAdvances. The method is based on a mechanism known as an indirect exchange interaction. (2020-07-24)

Polarization of Br2 molecule in vanadium oxide cluster cavity and new alkane bromination
A hemispherical vanadium oxide cluster has a cavity that can accommodate a bromine molecule. It was found that a bromine molecule trapped in the cavity was polarized and that an alkane molecule like pentane, butane and propane could be brominated with the bromine molecule in the cavity with a selectivity differing from ordinary bromination. The present findings are expected to be useful for polarization of small molecules and design of highly functional catalysts. (2020-07-10)

Vapor fix lifts up perovskite crystal performance
A facile and mild bromine treatment eliminates surface and bulk defects from perovskites to boost the materials' optoelectronic properties. (2020-06-18)

NASA reports Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion hit record low in March
Ozone levels above the Arctic reached a record low for March, NASA researchers report. An analysis of satellite observations show that ozone levels reached their lowest point on March 12 at 205 Dobson units. While such low levels are rare, they are not unprecedented. Similar low ozone levels occurred in the upper atmosphere, or stratosphere, in 1997 and 2011. In comparison, the lowest March ozone value observed in the Arctic is usually around 240 Dobson units. (2020-04-16)

Discovery by UMass Lowell-led team challenges nuclear theory
A discovery by a team of researchers led by UMass Lowell nuclear physicists could change how atoms are understood by scientists and help explain extreme phenomena in outer space. (2020-04-01)

A hidden electronic transition 'S0 → Tn' in heavy-atom-containing molecules
Researchers in Japan have discovered S0 → Tn, a previously overlooked electronic transition in photoreactions occurring in heavy atom-containing molecules exposed to visible light. The study was published online in Angewadte Chemie International Edition on March 9, 2020. (2020-03-11)

NREL research boosts stability of perovskites, helps silicon solar cells
A change in chemical composition enabled scientists to boost the longevity and efficiency of a perovskite solar cell developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). (2020-03-10)

Layered solar cell technology boosts efficiency, affordability
Researchers from CU Boulder have created a low-cost solar cell with one of the highest power-conversion efficiencies to date, by layering cells and using a unique combination of elements. (2020-03-05)

Improving the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon-nanotube-based fibers
University of Illinois researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology recently developed a technique that can be used to build carbon-nanotube-based fibers by creating chemical crosslinks. The technique improves the electrical and mechanical properties of these materials. (2020-02-18)

Blue-emitting diode demonstrates limitations and promise of perovskite semiconductors
Halide perovskites have garnered attention because they're highly efficient at capturing energy in solar cells and efficient emitters in diodes. But researchers failed at making perovskite LEDs that emit blue light. UC Berkeley chemists succeeeded, but X-ray studies of the LED's structure show that it's very sensitive to temperature, humidity and chemical environment. Hence environmental and chemical control is essential for stable operation. But these properties also allow for potentially broader use, such as sensors. (2020-01-24)

Toward safer disposal of printed circuit boards 
Printed circuit boards are vital components of modern electronics. However, once they have served their purpose, they are often burned or buried in landfills, polluting the air, soil and water. Most concerning are the brominated flame retardants added to printed circuit boards to keep them from catching fire. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering have developed a ball-milling method to break down these potentially harmful compounds, enabling safer disposal. (2020-01-15)

Iodine may slow ozone layer recovery
Air pollution and iodine from the ocean contribute to damage of Earth's ozone layer. (2020-01-13)

Freeze frame: Scientists capture atomic-scale snapshots of artificial proteins
Scientists at Berkeley Lab are the first to use cryo-EM (cryogenic electron microscopy), a Nobel Prize-winning technique originally designed to image proteins in solution, to image atomic changes in a synthetic soft material. Their findings have implications for the synthesis of 2D materials for a wide variety of applications. (2019-12-04)

Tiny tweaks for big wins in solar cells
Changes in composition are shown to affect light-harvesting layer crystallization and perovskite solar cell efficiency. (2019-08-26)

Sea snail compound reduces cancer risk
The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. Researchers at Flinders University, Southern Cross University and Monash University in Australia have isolated one compound in the gland secretions from the Australian white rock sea snail (Dicathasis orbita) which has not only antibacterial and anti-inflammatory qualities, but important anti-cancer properties. (2019-08-26)

A crystal clear step closer to commerical solar cells
Record-breaking, high-efficiency single crystals bring perovskite solar cells closer to market. (2019-07-11)

What happens when you explode a chemical bond?
Light-induced breakage of chemical bonds can lead to damage in the body and environment, but techniques for studying this photochemical reaction have been limited to before and after snapshots. With attosecond lasers and a technique to probe the energy states of photoexcited molecules, UC Berkeley chemists have made a movie of the process preceding breakup. The technique will help study biological molecules that absorb light without breaking bonds, such as rhodopsin in the retina. (2019-07-11)

Researchers explain visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites
Researchers led by an electrical engineer from the University of Houston have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices. (2019-06-24)

Characterization of 'hidden' dioxins from informal e-waste processing
The composition of mixed brominated/chlorinated dibenzofurans (PXDFs) and diphenyl ethers in soils from an e-waste site in Ghana suggests a formation of PXDFs through condensation of the flame retardant PBDEs and subsequent bromine-to-chlorine exchange. PXDFs were substantial contributors of toxic equivalents among dioxins from e-waste burning. (2019-04-13)

Peptides with brominated tryptophan analogs could protect marine animals
Bromotryptophan is a nonstandard amino acid that is rarely incorporated in ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (ribosomal peptides). Bromotryptophan and its analogs sometimes occur in non-ribosomal peptides. This paper presents an overview of ribosomal and non-ribosomal peptides that are known to contain bromotryptophan and its analogs. (2019-04-04)

Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing
A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control. (2019-03-15)

New approach improving stability and optical properties of perovskite films
Metal halide perovskites are regarded as next generation materials for light emitting devices. A recent joint-research co-led by the scientist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a new and efficient fabrication approach to produce all-inorganic perovskite films with better optical properties and stability, enabling the development of high colour-purity and low-cost perovskite light-emitting devices (LEDs) with a high operational lifetime. (2019-02-13)

UN warns of rising levels of toxic brine as desalination plants meet growing water needs
A fast-rising number of desalination plants (~16,000, with capacity concentrated in the Middle East / North Africa) quench a growing thirst for freshwater but also create a salty dilemma: how to deal with the chemical-laden leftover brine. In a new analysis, UN experts say that for every litre of freshwater, desalination plants produce on average 1.5 litres of brine (though values vary dramatically by plant). Globally, 142 million cubic meters of brine is discharged daily. (2019-01-14)

'Environmentally friendly' flame retardant could degrade into less safe compounds
To reduce the risk of fire, many everyday products -- from building materials to furniture to clothing -- contain flame retardants. In recent years, some of these compounds were shown to have harmful effects on the environment, causing them to be replaced by more eco-friendly alternatives. However, a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, indicates that heat or ultraviolet light could break down a 'safe' flame retardant into potentially harmful compounds. (2019-01-09)

How ice particles promote the formation of radicals
The production of chlorofluorocarbons, which damage the ozone layer, has been banned as far as possible. However, other substances can also tear holes in the ozone layer in combination with ice particles, such as those found in clouds. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, the University of Duisburg-Essen and Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have discovered a possible mechanism for this. They describe it in the journal Physical Review Letters on Nov. 13, 2018. (2018-12-07)

High-performance solar cells: Physicists grow stable perovskite layers
Crystalline perovskite cells are the key to cutting-edge thin-film solar cells. Although they already achieve very high levels of efficiency in the laboratory, commercial applications are hampered by the fact that the material is still too unstable. Furthermore, there is no reliable industrial production process for perovskites. In a new study published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) present an approach that could solve this problem. (2018-11-08)

Perovskites -- materials of the future in optical communication
Researchers at the universities in Linköping and Shenzhen have shown how an inorganic perovskite can be made into a cheap and efficient photodetector that transfers both text and music. ''It's a promising material for future rapid optical communication'', says Feng Gao, researcher at Linköping University. (2018-10-15)

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