Current Bronx News and Events

Current Bronx News and Events, Bronx News Articles.
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Tobacco exposure in kids, risk of increased blood pressure
Researchers investigated whether children and adolescents who smoked or lived with a smoker had an increased risk of elevated blood pressure. (2021-02-23)

Vaccine confidence grows under new administration, latest CUNY SPH Survey reveals
Under the Biden Administration, New Yorkers' acceptance of the Covid-19 vaccine has increased significantly. In September, 55% of residents reported they would take the vaccine when it became available and this January, 64% reported they would take it. (2021-02-09)

New study: available drugs can prevent rejection and tissue injury after transplantation
Controlling inflammation after transplantation of organs, cells, or tissues is critical for graft survival; however, it can be difficult. Continuing injuries due to chronic rejection can be particularly problematic. Now, a team of researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine report that neutralizing the cell signaling molecule, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), can prevent cascades of injurious molecules and signals after cell transplantation in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. (2020-12-21)

Stroke and altered mental state increase risk of death for COVID-19 patients
People hospitalized with COVID-19 and neurological problems including stroke and confusion, have a higher risk of dying than other COVID-19 patients, according to a study published online today by researchers at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the journal Neurology. These findings have the potential to identify and focus treatment efforts on individuals most at risk and could decrease COVID-19 deaths. (2020-12-18)

Exoskeleton-assisted walking improves mobility in individuals with spinal cord injury
''Participants showed improvement regardless of level of injury, completeness, or duration of injury,'' noted Dr. Forrest, ''indicating that exoskeletons can be used to improve mobility across a broad spectrum of individuals with neurological deficits caused by spinal cord injury. Our results can be used to guide the application of exoskeletons to spinal cord injury rehabilitation, and the timely acquisition of skills for the safe use of these devices for rehabilitation and community use.'' (2020-11-12)

Lung scans for stroke patients could provide earlier COVID-19 detection
Examination of the lungs via computed tomography angiogram (CTA) scans helped researchers screen for and detect COVID-19 earlier than traditional nasal swab tests in acute stroke patients. Using CTA scan results in combination with COVID-19 symptom questionnaires, researchers were able to detect COVID-19 with 83% accuracy. (2020-10-29)

Study finds that children's immune response protects against COVID-19
The first study comparing the immune responses of adults and children with COVID-19 has detected key differences that may contribute to understanding why children usually have milder disease than adults. The findings also have important implications for vaccines and drugs being developed to curb COVID-19. The study was published today in Science Translational Medicine and was conducted by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Children's Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM), and Yale University. (2020-09-21)

Pollution exposure at work may be associated with heart abnormalities among Latinx community
Hispanic/Latinx adults exposed to burning wood, vehicle exhaust, pesticides or metals while at work may have abnormal heart structure and function. The longer workers are exposed at their jobs, the more likely they are to have heart structure and function abnormalities. (2020-08-26)

Common blood test identifies benefits and risks of steroid treatment in COVID-19 patients
A new study led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System (www.montefiore.org) confirms the findings of the large scale British trial of steroid use for COVID-19 patients and advances the research by answering several key questions: Which patients are most likely to benefit from steroid therapy? Could some of them be harmed? Can other formulations of steroids substitute for the agent studied in the British trial? The research was published today in the Journal of Hospital Medicine. (2020-07-22)

Montefiore and Einstein test a new drug combination to conquer COVID-19
Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine have begun the next stage of the Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT), to evaluate treatment options for people hospitalized with severe COVID-19 infection. The new iteration of the trial, known as ACTT 2, is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-05-26)

FreshDirect depot brings increased traffic to South Bronx
The 2018 opening of the FreshDirect warehouse in Mott Haven, Bronx, significantly increased truck and vehicle flow within that neighborhood, according to a study led by scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Increases in traffic translated into small increases in air pollution and noise. Results are published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. (2020-05-11)

Disproportionate burden of COVID-19 for immigrants in the Bronx, New York
The authors explain why COVID-19 presents a greater burden for immigrant communities and this article advocates for a more equitable health care system. (2020-05-08)

Cancer patients face high mortality from COVID-19
People with cancer who develop COVID-19 are much more likely to die from the disease than those without cancer, according to physician-researchers at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. The study, published today in the online edition of Cancer Discovery, is the largest so far to assess outcomes for patients with cancer who have also been infected with COVID-19. (2020-05-01)

Stark disparities in COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates among New York
Researchers found that COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates varied across New York City boroughs. The Bronx -- with the highest proportion of racial/ethnic minorities, the most poverty, and lowest educational attainment -- had higher rates of hospitalization and death related to COVID-19 than all other boroughs. These rates were lowest in affluent Manhattan, comprised of a predominately white population. COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 persons was nearly two times greater in the Bronx than in Manhattan. (2020-04-29)

Sexual risk behavior is reduced with involvement of parents and healthcare providers
Randomized Control Trial under an NIH grant demonstrates the efficacy of a clinic-based triadic healthcare intervention called 'Families Talking Together' to protect adolescents from sexual health risks such as unwanted pregnancy and HIV/AIDS. (2020-04-28)

Microbiome may hold key to identifying HPV-infected women at risk for pre-cancer
Gardnerella bacteria in the cervicovaginal microbiome may serve as a biomarker to identify women infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) who are at risk for progression to precancer, according to a study published March 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Robert Burk and Mykhaylo Usyk of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and colleagues. (2020-03-26)

Study examines a new model for older adult wellness
Community-based wellness instructors can provide tailored wellness care to older adults, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. A randomized controlled trial assessing whether community self-management with wellness coaching could improve participants' overall wellbeing was the foundation to outline the components of a new model of community-based wellness called the Person-centered Wellness Home. (2020-01-22)

Treatment of migraine pain in randomized clinical trial
Adults experiencing a migraine of moderate or severe severity took the drug ubrogepant or placebo and reported if after two hours they were free of pain and of their most bothersome migraine-associated symptom in this randomized clinical trial. (2019-11-19)

Firearm-related eye injuries to patients under 21
Researchers used data from a national registry of hospitalized trauma cases in the United States to examine patterns of firearm-related eye injuries among patients under age 21 from 2008 through 2014. There were about 8,700 eye injuries from firearms in the US during that time, of which nearly a quarter (1,972) were in patients under 21, mostly male adolescents ages 12 to 18. (2019-10-10)

Study links sleep disturbances and Alzheimer's among Hispanics
Sleep disturbances among Hispanics may increase their risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study led by a University of Miami Miller School neurologist and sleep expert. (2019-10-09)

ECOG-ACRIN announces late-breaking TAILORx data at ESMO Congress 2019
The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2019 Congress will present, and JAMA Oncology will concurrently publish, the clinical outcomes of a subset of women with early breast cancer who participated in TAILORx, the landmark breast cancer treatment trial. This secondary analysis of the prospective TAILORx trial will focus on the arm that received chemotherapy plus endocrine therapy to prevent recurrence, based on a score of 26-100 on the 21-tumor gene expression assay. (2019-09-25)

Delaying start of head, neck cancer treatment in underserved, urban patients associated with worse outcomes
This observational study looked at the factors and outcomes associated with delaying the start of treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in an underserved urban population. The analysis included 956 patients with HNSCC treated at a health center in New York City. The authors report that delaying the initiation of treatment beyond 60 days was associated with poorer survival and an increased risk of HNSCC recurrence. (2019-09-12)

Experience of being a minority puts US teens at higher risk of anxiety, depression
Puerto Rican teens growing up as minorities in the South Bronx are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than their peers growing up as a majority in Puerto Rico, even under similar conditions of poverty. (2019-09-09)

Changes in subsistence hunting threaten local food security
Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests -- the mainstay of local people as a source of protein and a direct connection to these ecosystems -- is in jeopardy from a variety of factors. (2019-05-17)

Bronx river turtles get a check-up
A team of scientists and veterinarians gave a health evaluation of turtles living in the Bronx River, one of the most urbanized rivers in the U.S. and the only remaining freshwater river that flows through New York City. (2019-05-02)

Nurses use FDNY geospatial mapping of opioid overdoses to inform clinical practice in real time
Nurse practitioners and nursing students can use local, real-time maps of opioid overdoses to inform their clinical work with adolescents in community health settings, finds new research from NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. (2019-04-10)

Some children can 'recover' from autism, but problems often remain
Research in the past several years has shown that children can outgrow a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), once considered a lifelong condition. In a new study, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System have found that the vast majority of such children still have difficulties that require therapeutic and educational support. The study was published online today in the Journal of Child Neurology. (2019-03-12)

Scientists look to past to help identify fish threatened with local extinction
Marine scientists from the University of Queensland, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups have developed a methodology to assess fish stocks that combines new data with archeological and historical records - some dating back to the 8th Century AD. (2019-02-13)

Perceived barriers to minority medical students pursuing dermatology
The specialty of dermatology is one of the least diverse medical fields. In this study, a survey was conducted among 155 medical students (58 percent of whom were nonwhite) to understand perceived barriers to pursuing a career in dermatology by minority medical students. (2019-01-09)

Polluted city neighborhoods are bad news for asthmatic children
Children with asthma who grow up in a New York City neighborhood where air pollution is prevalent need emergency medical treatment more often than asthmatics in less polluted areas. This is according to researchers from Columbia University in the US in a new study published in the Springer Nature-branded journal Pediatric Research. (2018-10-18)

PPR virus poses threat to conservation
A team of conservationists from the Royal Veterinary College, WCS, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna published a letter in this week's edition of the journal Science on the threat of the virus peste des petits ruminants (PPR) to conservation. (2018-10-15)

Are vulnerable lions eating endangered zebras?
Are Laikipia's recovering lions turning to endangered Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) for their next meal? (2018-08-31)

Estrogen could promote healthy development of preterm infants
Premature birth alters the balance of interneurons in the cerebral cortex that can be restored with estrogen treatment, according to a study of human brain tissue and preterm rabbits published in JNeurosci. (2018-07-23)

Soccer heading -- not collisions -- cognitively impairs players
Worse cognitive function in soccer players stems mainly from frequent ball heading rather than unintentional head impacts due to collisions, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found. The findings suggest that efforts to reduce long-term brain injuries may be focusing too narrowly on preventing accidental head collisions. The study published online today in the Frontiers in Neurology. (2018-04-24)

Research explains link between exercise and appetite loss
Ever wonder why intense exercise temporarily curbs your appetite? In research described in today's issue of PLOS Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers reveal that the answer is all in your head -- more specifically, your arcuate nucleus. (2018-04-24)

Landmark paper finds light at end of the tunnel for world's wildlife and wild places
A new WCS paper published in the journal BioScience finds that the enormous trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization are rewriting the future of biodiversity conservation in the 21st century, offering new hope for the world's wildlife and wild places. (2018-04-23)

NYU Dentistry study identifies effective school-based cavity prevention program
School-based prevention programs can substantially reduce children's cavities -- but what type of treatment should be delivered in schools to best prevent tooth decay? A new study by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry, published in the journal BMC Oral Health, suggests that cavity prevention programs with a combination of prevention strategies may be more effective than one alone for reducing tooth decay. (2018-04-16)

Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking water
A team of researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and other groups have found that increasing land clearing for logging in Solomon Islands-even with best management strategies in place -- will lead to unsustainable levels of soil erosion and significant impacts to downstream water quality. (2018-04-16)

Planting a park on the Cross-Bronx expressway would save money and lives
Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health explored the cost-effectiveness of placing a deck park on top of the Cross-Bronx Expressway, finding the plan would save money and lives. The results are published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2018-01-30)

Use of dirty heating oil in NYC concentrated uptown
Residential buildings that continued to burn residual fuel oil were concentrated in Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, as of late 2015. Compared to cleaner heating sources such as natural gas, these dirty fuels produce high levels of particulate matter, exposure to which is linked to asthma, obesity, developmental delays, and other health problems. (2018-01-22)

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