Current Bronze Age News and Events

Current Bronze Age News and Events, Bronze Age News Articles.
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Changing livestock in ancient Europe reflect political shifts
In ancient European settlements, livestock use was likely primarily determined by political structure and market demands, according to a study published February 17, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ariadna Nieto-Espinet and colleagues of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Barcelona. (2021-02-17)

Study describes the diversity of genetic changes that cause inherited kidney disease
A study has described genetic changes in patients with the most common form of hereditary kidney disease that affects an estimated 12.5 million people worldwide. The research, which focussed on Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in Ireland, provides insights into PKD that will assist doctors and patients in the management of this of inherited condition. (2021-02-08)

Increased risk of dying from COVID for people with severe mental disorders
People with severe mental disorders have a significantly increased risk of dying from COVID-19. This has been shown in a new study from Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Among the elderly, the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19 was almost fourfold for those with severe mental disorders compared to non-mentally ill people in the same age. (2021-02-03)

Fine tuned: adjusting the composition and properties of semiconducting 2D alloys
Semiconducting 2D alloys could be key to overcoming the technical limitations of modern electronics. Although 2D Si-Ge alloys would have interesting properties for this purpose, they were only predicted theoretically. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have realized the first experimental demonstration. They have also shown that the Si to Ge ratio can be adjusted to fine tune the electronic properties of the alloys, paving the way for novel applications. (2021-02-02)

What did the Swiss eat during the Bronze Age?
People living at the Bronze Age faced a series of challenges: climate, opening up of trade and population growth. How did they respond to changes in their diet? UNIGE and UPF have carried out isotopic analyses on skeletons together with plant remains. They discovered that manure use had become widespread over time to improve crop harvests in response to demographic growth. They also found that there had been a radical change in dietary habits. (2021-02-02)

Frequent cannabis use by young people linked to decline in IQ
A study has found that adolescents who frequently use cannabis may experience a decline in Intelligence Quotient (IQ) over time. The findings of the research provide further insight into the harmful neurological and cognitive effects of frequent cannabis use on young people. (2021-01-28)

An ancient economy
As one of the most experienced archaeologists studying California's Native Americans, Lynn Gamble(link is external) knew the Chumash Indians had been using shell beads as money for at least 800 years. (2021-01-28)

On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maikel H. G. Kuijpers and C?t?lin N. Popa of Leiden University, Netherlands. (2021-01-20)

Researchers discover potential new therapy for chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer
Scientists have discovered a molecule that can selectively kill cells of a hard-to-treat subtype of breast cancer, which could lead to a new therapy. (2021-01-18)

Participation in competitive sport in adolescence brings midlife health benefits to women
Females who participate in competitive sport during adolescence have better fitness at midlife than do females with no competitive sport background in adolescence, reveals a study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä. (2020-12-07)

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have demonstrated that adolescents who valued their interests and curiosity had higher wellbeing in old age from a 60-year-old cohort in the UK. We additionally found that adolescents with low self-control who valued money and steady jobs had significantly lower wellbeing in old age. (2020-11-11)

Age gates on alcohol websites are ineffective, Texas A&M research shows
''Age gates'' that aim to keep underage users off alcohol websites are mostly ineffective, a Texas A&M University alcohol researcher found. (2020-11-11)

Paleogenomics -- the prehistory of modern dogs
An international team of scientists has used ancient DNA samples to elucidate the population history of dogs. The results show that dogs had already diverged into at least five distinct lineages by about 11,000 years ago and that their early population history only partially reflects that of human groups. (2020-11-06)

Population dynamics and the rise of empires in Inner Asia
In a new study published in Cell, researchers seek to understand the genetic, sociopolitical and cultural changes surrounding the formation of the eastern Eurasian Steppe's historic empires. The study analyzes genome-wide data for 214 ancient individuals spanning 6,000 years and discusses the genetic and cultural changes that preceded the rise of the Xiongnu and Mongol nomadic pastoralist empires. (2020-11-05)

Bronze Age travel routes revealed using pioneering research method
Archaeologists from the University of Sydney have reconstructed the ancient seasonal migration routes of Bronze Age herders in Xinjiang, north-western China. Published in the high-ranking journal PLOS ONE, their research was the result of innovative methodology. To determine snow cover and vegetation cycles, crucial to the survival of Bronze Age people and their flocks, they examined both satellite imagery and archaeological evidence, as well as interviewing modern-day herders. (2020-11-04)

Sea-level rise will have complex consequences
Rising sea levels will affect coasts and human societies in complex and unpredictable ways, according to a new study that examined 12,000 years in which a large island became a cluster of smaller ones. (2020-11-04)

Archaeologists reveal human resilience in the face of climate change in ancient Turkey
An examination of two documented periods of climate change in the greater Middle East, between approximately 4,500 and 3,000 years ago, reveals local evidence of resilience and even of a flourishing ancient society despite the changes in climate seen in the larger region. The study demonstrates that human responses to climate change vary at the local level, and highlights how challenge and collapse in some areas were matched by resilience and opportunities elsewhere. (2020-10-29)

Bronze Age herders were less mobile than previously thought
Bronze Age pastoralists in what is now southern Russia apparently covered shorter distances than previously thought. It is believed that the Indo-European languages may have originated from this region, and these findings raise new questions about how technical and agricultural innovations spread to Europe. An international research team, with the participation of the University of Basel, has published a paper on this topic. (2020-10-21)

Mammography screening saves lives also in older age
Mammography, which is an x-ray picture of the breast, is efficient also for women over the age of 70. For women invited to regular mammography screening over the age of 70, the reduction in mortality rate was significant. This according to a vast new study from Sweden. (2020-10-20)

New blood test predicts which COVID-19 patients will develop severe infection
Scientists have developed, for the first time, a score that can accurately predict which patients will develop a severe form of Covid-19. (2020-10-14)

Gold- and bronze-like paints that don't contain metal
Lustrous metallic paints are used to enhance the beauty of many products, such as home decorations, cars and artwork. But most of these pigments owe their sheen to flakes of aluminum, copper, zinc or other metals, which have drawbacks. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega have developed organic-only dyes that can form films resembling gold or bronze, without the need for metals. (2020-10-14)

Age does not contribute to COVID-19 susceptibility
Scientists have estimated that the age of an individual does not indicate how likely they are to be infected by SARS-CoV-2. However, development of symptoms, progression of the disease, and mortality are age-dependent. (2020-10-12)

Olympic athletes should be mindful of their biological clocks
Biological clocks have sizeable effects on the performance of elite athletes. This conclusion was drawn by chronobiologists from the University of Groningen after studying the times achieved by swimmers in four different Olympic Games. Shifting the clock to reach peak performance at the right time could make the difference between winning and losing. The results were published on 8 October in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-10-08)

Anglo-Saxon warlord found by detectorists could redraw map of post-Roman Britain
A discovery by a metal detectorist on club outing proved to be a significant burial with the remains of an imposing warlord, along with well-preserved weapons and items. (2020-10-04)

Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found. (2020-09-28)

Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
Traces of violence on 1700 year old skeletons allow researchers to reconstruct warfare and sacrifices of nomads in Siberia. An international and interdisciplinary team of anthropologists, archaeologists and specialists in forensic sciences led by Marco Milella from the University of Bern performed a detailed and revealing analysis of the traumas found on the skeletal remains. (2020-09-18)

Blonde Scandinavians or well-travelled Southern Europeans? Research busts myths of Vikings
Our notion of the Scandinavian Viking very likely stems from films rather than history. In reality, their genome contains lots of genes from Southern and Eastern Europe, which also implies that they had dark rather than blonde hair. And within the Scandinavian borders, the Vikings did not really mix genetically; instead, they travelled abroad on plundering raids. This is revealed by new research from the University of Copenhagen. (2020-09-16)

Domestic horses probably did not originate in Anatolia
Domestic horses likely did not originate in Anatolia as previously suspected, according to a new study of ancient horse remains dating as far back as 9000 BCE. Instead, they may have been introduced to the peninsula -- which makes up most of modern-day Turkey -- and the nearby Caucasus region from the Eurasian Steppe by about 2000 BCE, during the Bronze Age. (2020-09-16)

Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age
Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-09-10)

New dating of Nebra sky disk
Until now the Nebra sky disk was deemed to be from the Early Bronze Age and therefore the world's oldest depiction of the cosmos. Archaeologists from Goethe University Frankfurt and Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich have now reanalysed diverse data on the reconstruction of the discovery site and surrounding circumstances of the find. Their findings are that the disk must be dated in the Iron Age, making it about 1,000 years younger than previously assumed. This makes all previous astronomical interpretations obsolete. (2020-09-03)

New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. In an article recently featured in the journal Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, Nishant Malik, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, outlined the new technique he developed and showed how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt. (2020-09-03)

Study reveals lactose tolerance happened quickly in Europe
A new study published in Current Biology reveals that the ability for humans to digest milk (lactase persistence) spread through Central Europe quickly in evolutionary terms. (2020-09-03)

Lactose tolerance spread throughout Europe in only a few thousand years
The human ability to digest the milk sugar lactose after infancy spread throughout Central Europe in only a few thousand years. This is the conclusion reached by an international research team led by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. The researchers analyzed genetic material from the bones of individuals who had fallen in a conflict around 1200 B.C. on the banks of the Tollense, a river in present-day Germany, and report their findings in Current Biology this week. (2020-09-03)

RCSI research finds air pollution in Ireland associated with strokes
Scientists have found that air pollution in the winter is associated with more hospitalisations for all strokes in Dublin. (2020-08-11)

POSTECH solves the durability issue of hydrogen cars
Professor Yong-Tae Kim's research team improves the durability of automotive fuel cells through selective electro-catalysis. (2020-07-13)

Age discrimination laws don't protect older women as they do older men
Older women in the workforce should be considered collectively as a unique demographic group that includes both gender and age if they're to receive adequate protection against workplace discrimination, according to a new paper published by a University at Buffalo economist. (2020-06-18)

RCSI researchers find potential new way to improve treatment for common bleeding disorder
Scientists have found a potential new way to promote blood clotting that could be used to help develop treatments for Von Willebrand Disease, the most common genetic bleeding disorder. (2020-06-11)

Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links
Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail. (2020-06-11)

How is a metal formed?
Metal is characterized by free electrons which give rise to its high electric conductivity. But how exactly is a metallic conduction band formed from originally localized electrons and what is the corresponding microscopic picture for the material involved? Scientists succeeded in mapping at the molecular level the electrolyte-to-metal transition in alkali metal -- liquid ammonia solutions using a combination of photoelectron spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations. (2020-06-05)

Age affects decisions related to breast cancer surgery
A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that breast cancer surgery is safe for patients who are older than 70 years of age, but age can influence the decision to undergo surgery. (2020-06-03)

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