Current Bruce News and Events

Current Bruce News and Events, Bruce News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 11 | 432 Results
Researchers find a novel connection between cell metabolism and cell division
Many biological processes are subject to rhythmic changes. Well-known examples of this are the so-called circadian rhythm, an ''internal clock'' with a period of around 24 hours, or the shorter ultradian rhythm. Cell division is often linked to these rhythms. Biologists from Saarbr├╝cken and Kaiserslautern have now found out that these rhythms and their coupling with cell division is closely related to hydrogen peroxide. The study was published in the renowned journal Nature Chemical Biology. (2021-02-16)

How the insect got its wings: Scientists (at last!) tell the tale
How insect wings evolved has puzzled biologists for over a century. Finally, a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, has shown that the insect wing evolved from an outgrowth on the crustacean leg that was incorporated into the animal's body wall. (2020-12-01)

Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility. But when there are too many of these genetic exchanges, called crossover events, the segregation of chromosomes into eggs is flawed, say biologists who combined on a basic science project done across three labs at the University of Oregon and Northwestern University. (2020-10-07)

Repeated pregnancy loss may be tied to the olfactory system
Understanding the connection could lead to a new search for the causes of unexplained spontaneous miscarriage (2020-09-29)

Vitamin D deficiency leads to obesity, stunted growth in zebrafish
Using a zebrafish model, researchers have found that vitamin D deficiency during early development can disrupt the metabolic balance between growth and fat accumulation. (2020-09-29)

Zeroing out their own zap
African fish called mormyrids communicate using pulses of electricity. New research from biologists in Arts & Sciences shows that a time-shifted signal in the brain helps the fish to ignore their own pulse. This skill has co-evolved with large and rapid changes in these signals across species. (2020-08-12)

Report looks to improve quality measures for medical care of homebound older adults
There are an estimated 2 million older adults who are homebound or unable to leave their homes due to multiple chronic conditions and functional impairment. Home-based primary care provides access to care for these patients and has been shown to save costs for the Medicare program. (2020-05-22)

How birds evolved big brains
An international team of evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds. (2020-04-23)

University of Guelph develops effective way to replenish threatened plants
Planting Hill's thistle seeds has low flowering and germination rates. The study used the CPR (Conservation, Propagation, Redistribution) method to preserve the genetic material of germ cells of two plants and then use that material to produce 1,000 plants in the lab. They transplanted 300 at 12 sites in Ontario. Survival rate ranged from 67 to 99 per cent, with nearly all plants surviving the winter and showing shoot regeneration and flowering. (2020-04-22)

Archaeology: Ancient string discovery sheds light on Neanderthal life
The discovery of the oldest known direct evidence of fiber technology -- using natural fibers to create yarn -- is reported in Scientific Reports this week. The finding furthers our understanding of the cognitive abilities of Neanderthals during the Middle Palaeolithic period (30,000-300,000 years ago). (2020-04-09)

Support communities key for military wives and partners facing employment and social challenges
Military spouses can struggle to find and maintain employment and face severe restrictions on their social lives because of their partners' working patterns. (2020-03-06)

Portable device lights the way to better foodborne illness detection
Researchers at Purdue University have been working to develop new technologies to help stop the spread of foodborne illnesses, which kill 3,000 people a year, by detecting them more efficiently. They have developed a bioluminescence-based assay coupled with a portable device that works with smartphones and laptops to do on-site testing for harmful E. coli in food samples. (2020-02-04)

Pulling the plug on calcium pumps -- potential new treatment strategy for pancreatic cancer
UK scientists have identified a new way to kill pancreatic cancer cells by 'pulling the plug' on the energy generator that fuels calcium pumps on their cell surface. The study, published in the British Journal of Cancer, reports how switching off the cancer's energy supply causes the pancreatic cancer cells to become 'poisoned' by an irreversible build-up of calcium. (2020-01-16)

Follicular lymphoma remission for 2+ years indicates disease-free status could be lifelong
People with follicular lymphoma, a slow-growing lymphatic-system cancer, who have been treated and are in remission for at least two years, may no longer have what has been considered an incurable disease based on highly sensitive testing; this means they no longer need therapy or active follow-up. (2019-12-08)

Virtual and mixed reality inferior to traditional learning in anatomy education
The McMaster study compared an MR model (Microsoft HoloLens) and a VR model (HTC VIVE) derived from a physical model to the actual model. The researchers focused on overall learning performance and the effects of stereopsis by using a strategy where the non-dominant eye was covered in one test condition. (2019-11-20)

Where the sun doesn't shine? Skin UV exposure reflected in poop
The sun can indeed shine out of your backside, suggests research. Not because you're self-absorbed, but because you've absorbed gut-altering UV radiation. This is the first study to show that skin exposure to UVB light alters the gut microbiome in humans. Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, the analysis suggests that vitamin D mediates the change -- which could help explain the protective effect of UVB light in inflammatory diseases like MS and IBD. (2019-10-24)

Pivotal role found for IgG autoantibodies in IgA nephropathy
A study largely validates the hypothesis that immunoglobulin IgG is a crucial part of the pathogenic immunodeposits in glomeruli of patients with IgA nephropathy. Until now, routine immunofluorescence microscopy -- which identifies the presence of IgA in all cases of IgA nephropathy -- failed to show IgG in 50 to 80 percent of kidney biopsies. In addition, IgG found in those positive tests had never been tested for antigenic specificity, such as specificity against the IgA1. (2019-09-24)

Numbers limit how accurately digital computers model chaos
Digital computers use numbers based on flawed representations of real numbers, which may lead to inaccuracies when simulating the motion of molecules, weather systems and fluids, find UCL and Tufts University scientists. (2019-09-23)

Families continue to enjoy TV together -- but potentially ruin it for each other
TV companies battling to preserve the shared experience of scheduled TV viewing in an era of 24/7 streaming and personalised viewing need more than binge-watching contracts and no-sleeping agreements to keep customers. (2019-08-15)

New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research finds that the standard practice of using modern and fossil coral to measure sea-surface temperatures may not be as straightforward as originally thought. By combining high-resolution microscopic techniques and geochemical modeling, researchers are using the formational history of Porites coral skeletons to fine-tune the records used to make global climate predictions. (2019-06-18)

'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report
A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report in the journal Astrobiology. The bacterium that controls the formation of such rocks on Earth is ancient and thrives in harsh environments that are similar to conditions on Mars, said University of Illinois geology professor Bruce Fouke, who led the new, NASA-funded study. (See videos) (2019-05-29)

Human capital benefits of military boost economy by billions
A recent study finds that US government spending on military personnel has a positive impact on the nation's human capital -- essentially improving the American workforce. The study estimates the economic impact of this human capital improvement to be $89.8 billion for 2019 alone. (2019-05-17)

Creativity is not just for the young, study finds
If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story. A new study of winners of the Nobel Prize in economics finds that there are two different life cycles of creativity, one that hits some people early in their career and another that more often strikes later in life. (2019-04-26)

Ethical questions raised on body donation after medically assisted death
There are issues about the appropriateness of accepting or using MAID body donations; communication with donors including consenting processes, and the transparency surrounding MAID donation with staff, faculty and students. (2019-04-01)

Tracking pollen with quantum dots
Most plant species on earth are reliant on insects for pollination, including more than 30% of the food crops we eat. With insects facing rapid global decline, it is crucial that scientists understand which insects are important pollinators of different plants--this starts with tracking pollen. (2019-02-14)

Time parents spend with children key to academic success
The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce. (2019-02-04)

Examination of outpatient prescribing patterns for anxiety drugs
Benzodiazepines (tranquilizers) are a large class of drugs with lots of potential uses from treating anxiety to other conditions including insomnia, seizures and neuropathic pain. This study used nationally representative data to examine patterns in outpatient prescribing of benzodiazepines and included more than 386,000 ambulatory care visits from 2003 through 2015. (2019-01-25)

Brain imaging predicts response to public health campaign
Neuroimaging data obtained from a small group of smokers predicts the influence of a large anti-smoking media campaign targeting likely smokers, shows a new study published in JNeurosci. This approach could help improve informational materials designed to change people's attitudes and behaviors. (2019-01-07)

One big reason why women drop out of doctoral STEM programs
Many women in doctoral degree programs in fields like engineering and physics are in a class of their own -- and that's not a good thing. A new study found that the fewer females who enter a doctoral program at the same time, the less likely any one of them will graduate within six years. (2018-09-17)

Oregon chemists create circular fluorescent dyes for biological imaging
University of Oregon chemists have created a new class of fluorescent dyes that function in water and emit colors based solely on the diameter of circular nanotubes made of carbon and hydrogen. (2018-09-17)

Miniaturized HTS assay identifies selective modulators of GPR119 to treat type 2 diabetes
A novel high throughput screening (HTS) assay compatible with an ion channel biosensor component was used successfully to identify selective and active small molecule modulators of G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119), a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. (2018-09-11)

Brain-heart activity predicts post-malaria epilepsy in mice
Animals that develop epilepsy after an infection can be identified as early as three months prior to their first seizure by measuring interactions between the brain and the heart, according to new research using a mouse model of post-cerebral malaria epilepsy. Published in JNeurosci, this finding could inform efforts to diagnose and treat acquired epilepsy. (2018-08-27)

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression
Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don't respond to traditional antidepressants. (2018-07-30)

Not quite a 'double bind' for minority women in science
Many studies have shown that both minority and women scientists face disadvantages in reaching the highest levels of their careers. So it would make sense that minority women would face a 'double bind' that would particularly disadvantage them. But a new study using a massive database of scientific articles suggests that minority women actually face what might be called a 'one-and-a-half bind.' (2018-05-15)

Flavins keep a handy helper in their pocket
Freiburg researchers show for the first time in detail how a flavin-containing enzyme interacts with oxygen (2018-04-24)

Fossils highlight Canada-Russia connection 53 million years ago
A new 53 million-year-old insect fossil called a scorpionfly discovered at B.C.'s McAbee fossil bed site bears a striking resemblance to fossils of the same age from Pacific-coastal Russia, giving further evidence of an ancient Canada-Russia connection. (2018-03-28)

People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memories
People with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuits to do so. (2018-03-06)

Is hydrogen the fuel of the future?
As the race to find energy sources to replace our dwindling fossil fuel supplies continues apace, hydrogen is likely to play a crucial role in the future. (2018-02-06)

Understanding mental disorder through a scientific lens
As science reveals more about the origins and development of mental disorder, it also raises more questions. A team of clinical scientists delves into these complexities in a comprehensive new report, taking an in-depth look at three systems used for understanding mental-health disorders: the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and the Research Domain Criteria Project (RDoC). (2017-12-07)

Healthy people are at risk of developing heart disease, says Surrey expert
Healthy people who consume high levels of sugar are at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. (2017-10-04)

Page 1 of 11 | 432 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.