Current Bullet News and Events

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Novel RNA factors may help cancer cells thrive
Recent work by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital pinpoints critical changes in an enzyme known as DICER, which create a cascade of effects on this microRNAome. The team identified primary actors circ2082, a circular RNA, and RBM3, an RNA-binding protein, which form a complex with DICER to trap it in the nucleus of glioblastoma cells, therefore disrupting the cytoplasmic microRNAome. (2021-01-08)

Imaging of ballistic wounds, bullet composition and implications for MRI safety
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), because patients with ballistic embedded fragments are frequently denied MRI (due to indeterminate bullet composition sans shell casings), radiography and CT can be used to identify nonferromagnetic projectiles that are safe for MRI. (2020-12-29)

Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a team of researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use. These recommendations emphasize helping people gain greater control over their digital environments. (2020-12-21)

Helicates meet Rotaxanes to create promise for future disease treatment
A new approach to treating cancers and other diseases that uses a mechanically interlocked molecule as a 'magic bullet' has been designed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-11-23)

Asteroid's scars tell stories of its past
Asteroid Bennu, which was just sampled by NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, only recently migrated into Earth's neighborhood, according to a detailed analysis of impact marks on boulders on its surface. The report provides a new benchmark for understanding the evolution of asteroids and offers insights into space debris hazardous to spacecraft. (2020-10-30)

Secrets of 'smasher shrimp' property ladder revealed
Mantis shrimps carefully survey burrows before trying to evict rivals, new research shows. (2020-10-28)

Mandatory country-wide BCG vaccination found to correlate with slower growth rates of COVID-19 cases
Scientists have found that countries with mandatory Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination until at least the year 2000 tended to exhibit slower infection and death rates during the first 30 days of the outbreak (2020-07-31)

Even immediate, significant efforts to reduce plastic pollution could leave Earth with 710 million metric tons by 2040, modeling suggests
Immediate and globally coordinated action to limit plastic consumption and waste could reduce the rate of plastic pollution by nearly 80% over the next two decades, according to a new modeling report. (2020-07-23)

Process for 'two-faced' nanomaterials may aid energy, information tech
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used a simple process to implant atoms precisely into the top layers of ultra-thin crystals, yielding two-sided structures with different chemical compositions. The resulting materials, known as Janus structures after the two-faced Roman god, may prove useful in developing energy and information technologies. (2020-06-26)

Protein shapes matter in Alzheimer's research
Even a small change may cause long-term consequences. For amyloid beta peptides, a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a common chemical modification at a particular location on the molecule has a butterfly effect that leads to protein misfolding, aggregation and cellular toxicity. (2020-05-19)

Repurposing existing drugs for COVID-19 offers a more rapid alternative to a vaccine
Repurposing existing medicines focused on known drug targets is likely to offer a more rapid hope of tackling COVID-19 than developing and manufacturing a vaccine, argue an international team of scientists in the British Journal of Pharmacology today. (2020-05-07)

Pharmacists warn against malarial drugs as a cure for coronavirus
Early reports that anti-malarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine could be used to prevent and cure the virus have received a caution from Huddersfield pharmacists in an article published in the British Journal of Pharmacy. (2020-04-30)

Our oceans are suffering, but we can rebuild marine life
It's not too late to rescue global marine life, according to a study outlining the steps needed for marine ecosystems to recover from damage by 2050. University of Queensland scientist Professor Catherine Lovelock said the study found many components of marine ecosystems could be rebuilt if we try harder to address the causes of their decline. (2020-04-01)

Epigenetic inheritance: A silver bullet against climate change?
The rapid pace of climate change threatens all living species. An international team of researchers from Queen Mary University of London and GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research Kiel (Germany) has demonstrated that fish living in the Baltic Sea evolve using epigenetic mechanisms, yet to a lesser extent than previously hypothesized. (2020-03-20)

Firearm violence solutions from a public health perspective
While firearm violence is a major public health challenge in the United States, it has often been considered a law enforcement issue with only law enforcement solutions. An article by two University of Pennsylvania researchers advises that treating firearm violence as a disease and taking a public health approach to prevention and treatment can help reduce its harms. (2020-03-09)

Texas A&M engineers develop recipe to dramatically strengthen body armor
Researchers at Texas A&M University have formulated a new recipe that can prevent weaknesses in modern-day armor. By adding a tiny amount of the element silicon to boron carbide, a material commonly used for making body armor, they discovered that bullet-resistant gear could be made substantially more resilient to high-speed impacts. (2020-01-22)

Need to control blood sugar? There's a drink for that, says UBC prof
With more people with diabetes and pre-diabetes looking for novel strategies to help control blood sugar, new research from UBC's Okanagan campus suggests that ketone monoester drinks--a popular new food supplement--may help do exactly that. (2020-01-07)

Researchers discover how ant species uses abdomen for extra power during jumps
Researchers in the department of entomology at the University of Illinois have shown how a species of ant uses its abdomen to add speed to its jump, in a recent study published in Integrative Organismal Biology. The results indicate that moving their abdomens aids the ants to jump further, higher, and faster overall. This is particularly helpful to the ants as they try to navigate the detritus on a forest floor. (2019-12-18)

Cancer research that's out-of-this-world
University of Technology (UTS) researcher Dr. Joshua Chou is looking to replicate the promising results of experiments he has carried out on cancer cells in the zero gravity chamber built by his team in the UTS School of Biomedical Engineering. (2019-11-26)

Carnegie Mellon system locates shooters using smartphone video
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on video recordings from as few as three smartphones. (2019-11-20)

Theoretical tubulanes inspire ultrahard polymers
Rice University engineers print 3D blocks based on theoretical tubulanes and find they're nearly as hard as diamond. (2019-11-13)

New research identifies the strengths and weaknesses of super material
Scientists have measured how the super-plastic material ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, commercially known as Dyneema or Spectra, interacts when bolted to other materials. The research has established guidelines and failure maps for use of the material in joints with steel bolts. The research shows that while the material deforms at the joints, it's incredible difficult to actually break the fibres. (2019-10-01)

Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT
Study in PNAS shows that trapping TERT mRNA in the cell nucleus may keep TERT oncogene from being manufactured, silencing the action of TERT in driving cancer. (2019-09-10)

Bullet shape, velocity determine blood spatter patterns
Blood spatters are hydrodynamic signatures of violent crimes, often revealing when an event occurred and where the perpetrator and victim were located, and researchers have worked toward better understanding the fluid dynamics at play during gunshot spatters. In the Physics of Fluids, they propose a model for the disintegration of a liquid due to an arbitrarily shaped projectile. Their model focuses on providing predictive models of gunshot blood atomization and droplet flight and spattering. (2019-08-06)

Boosting amino acid derivative may be a treatment for schizophrenia
Many psychiatric drugs act on the receptors or transporters of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. However, there is a great need for alternatives, and research is looking at other targets along the brain's metabolic pathways. Lack of glycine betaine contributes to brain pathology in schizophrenia, and new research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) shows that betaine supplementation can counteract psychiatric symptoms in mice. (2019-06-26)

Powering a solution: Professor takes charge at improving lithium ion batteries safety
Dr. Yu Zhu and his team of graduate students in The University of Akron's College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering are working to improve the safety of Li-ion batteries by creating a shear-thickening electrolyte -- a substance that can become thicker under impact, set between the battery's anode and cathode that will be impact-resistant, thus not causing a fire or an explosion upon any collision. (2019-06-19)

Locating a shooter from the first shot via cellphone
Militaries have worked hard to develop technologies that simultaneously protect soldiers' hearing and aid in battlefield communication. However, these don't help if a soldier takes it off to assess the location of incoming gunfire. A French researcher has developed a proof of concept that uses the microphones in a TCAPS system to capture a shooter's acoustic information and transmit this to a soldier's smartphone to display shooter location in real time. (2019-05-13)

Filming how our immune system kill bacteria
To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system relies on nanomachines that can open deadly holes in their targets. UCL scientists have now filmed these nanomachines in action, discovering a key bottleneck in the process which helps to protect our own cells. (2019-05-06)

Vascular surgery after firearm injury associated with increased morbidity and mortality
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) found that among all hospitalizations that were due to firearm injury, patients who underwent surgical repair of their major blood vessels had the highest injury severity score (predictor of in-hospital death). (2019-04-25)

We now know how insects and bacteria control ice
in a paper published today in the Journal of the American Chemical Society University of Utah professor Valeria Molinero and her colleagues show how key proteins produced in bacteria and insects can either promote or inhibit the formation of ice, based on their length and their ability to team up to form large ice-binding surfaces. The results have wide application, particularly in understanding precipitation in clouds. (2019-04-12)

No silver bullet for helping the Great Barrier Reef
Using a combination of advanced satellite imaging and over 20 years of coral monitoring across the Reef, a team of researchers from Dalhousie University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (Coral CoE), the University of Adelaide and Lancaster University in the UK has found that chronic exposure to poor water quality is limiting the recovery rates of corals across wide swaths of the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-03-11)

Koala-spotting drones proves a flying success
QUT researchers have developed an innovative method for detecting koala populations using drones and infrared imaging that is more reliable and less invasive than traditional animal population monitoring techniques. (2019-03-01)

Molecule silences barrel, bullet pointed at transplanted organ
A powerful immune molecule helps protect transplanted organs from rejection by putting a silencer on two other immune molecules that converge to take a direct shot at the organ, scientists report. (2019-02-05)

High-speed supernova reveals earliest moments of a dying star
An international team of researchers, including the University of Leicester, found evidence for the much theorized 'hot cocoon'. (2019-01-16)

Workplace 'resilience' programs might not make any difference
Workplace resilience programmes, designed to bolster mental health and wellbeing, and encourage employees to seek help when issues arise, might not make any difference, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2018-12-18)

Transforming our food system to ensure a sustainable future
By 2050, the world will have almost 10 billion people. It will be impossible to feed everyone without exacerbating poverty, accelarting deforestation and increasing GHG emissions unless we start making substantial changes to our food system now. This issue is covered in a new report, Creating a Sustainable Food Future , published on December 5 in the World Resources Report series. The report was produced by WRI, in partnership with the World Bank, UN Environment, UN Development Programme, CIRAD and INRA. (2018-12-06)

A toxic bullet involved in bacterial competition found by researchers
A bacterial toxin that allows an infectious strain of bacteria to defeat its competitors has been discovered by Imperial College London scientists. (2018-11-20)

Diagnostic tool helps engineers to design better global infrastructure solutions
Designing safe bridges and water systems for low-income communities is not always easy for engineers coming from highly industrialized places. A new discipline called contextual engineering helps engineers think beyond personal values, expectations and definitions of project success when tackling global infrastructure problems. (2018-11-15)

Study finds that in treating obesity, one size does not fit all
Understanding the very different characteristics of subgroups of obese patients may hold the key to devising more effective treatments and interventions, new research from Brown University found. (2018-11-13)

Hot brew coffee has higher levels of antioxidants than cold brew
Comparing the properties of cold- and hot-brew coffee, researchers found similar acidity in both, but higher antioxidant levels in hot coffee. (2018-10-31)

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