Current Bumblebees News and Events

Current Bumblebees News and Events, Bumblebees News Articles.
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Drug to treat rare genetic disease may help control transmission of African Trypanosomiasis
African trypanosomiasis (also known as sleeping sickness) is a disease transmitted by tsetse flies and is fatal to humans and other animals; however, there is currently no vaccine, this disease is mainly controlled by reducing insect populations and patient treatment. A study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Alvaro Acosta-Serrano at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and an international team of researchers suggests that the approved drug nitisinone could be repurposed to kill tsetse flies without harming important pollinator insects. (2021-01-26)

Common pesticides stop bees and flies from getting a good night's sleep
Just like us, many insects need a decent night's sleep to function properly, but this might not be possible if they have been exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides, the most common form of insecticide used worldwide, suggests research by academics at the University of Bristol. (2021-01-21)

Big bumblebees learn locations of best flowers
Big bumblebees take time to learn the locations of the best flowers, new research shows. (2020-12-28)

Researchers make 'high vis vests' to help monitor bee behaviour
A team of researchers from the University of Sheffield and The Bumblebee Conservation Trust have been trialling new, low-cost ways to monitor bee species in the UK, by dressing bees in high visibility retroreflective vests. This novel research will be presented at the British Ecological Society's virtual Festival of Ecology. (2020-12-18)

To evade humans, this medicinal plant has evolved to hide in plain sight
Researchers reporting November 20, 2020 in the journal Current Biology have found that, in places where the herb is harvested more, the plant has evolved to blend in better with the background, making them harder for people to find. As a result, the plant varies in color from brown or grey to green, depending on whether it lives in a place that is frequented by human collectors or not. (2020-11-23)

Two pesticides approved for use in US harmful to bees
A previously banned insecticide, which was approved for agricultural use last year in the United States, is harmful for bees and other beneficial insects that are crucial for agriculture, and a second pesticide in widespread use also harms these insects. That is according to a new analysis from researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-09-29)

Bumblebees benefit from faba bean cultivation
About one third of payments received by farmers are linked to 'greening measures' to promote biodiversity. These have been criticized because the benefits for biodiversity are unclear. Researchers, including Göttingen University, investigated whether the cultivation of faba beans (Vicia faba - broad bean or fava bean) can support wild bees. They found that bumblebees benefit from cultivating faba beans, while other wild bees depend on semi-natural habitats. Results are in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2020-09-10)

Venom from honeybees found to kill aggressive breast cancer cells
Honeybee venom induces cancer cell death in hard to treat triple-negative breast cancer with minimal effect on healthy cells (2020-09-01)

Does city life make bumblebees larger?
Does urbanisation drive bumblebee evolution? A new study by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig provides an initial indication of this. According to the study, bumblebees are larger in cities and, therefore, more productive than their rural counterparts. In 'Evolutionary Applications', the research team reports that differences in body size maybe caused by the increasingly fragmented habitats in cities. (2020-08-17)

Study identifies spread of bee disease via flowers
One in 11 flowers carries disease-causing parasites known to contribute to bee declines, according to a Cornell University study that identifies how flowers act as hubs for transmitting diseases to bees and other pollinators. (2020-07-23)

More flowers and pollinator diversity could help protect bees from parasites
Having more flowers and maintaining diverse bee communities could help reduce the spread of bee parasites, according to a new study. (2020-07-22)

Native bees also facing novel pandemic
There is growing evidence that another ''pandemic'' has been infecting bees around the world for the past two decades, and is spreading: a fungal pathogen known as Nosema. (2020-07-09)

Wild bees depend on the landscape structure
Sowing strips of wildflowers along conventional cereal fields and the increased density of flowers in organic farming encourage bumblebees as well as solitary wild bees and hoverflies. Bumblebee colonies benefit from flower strips along small fields, but in organic farming, they benefit from large fields. This research was carried out by agroecologists from the University of Göttingen in a comparison of different farming systems and landscape types. The results of the study have been published in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2020-06-30)

Researchers look for answers as to why western bumblebees are declining
The decline of the Western bumblebee is likely not limited to one culprit but, instead, due to several factors that interact such as pesticides, pathogens, climate change and habitat loss. (2020-06-29)

Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light
Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans. (2020-06-28)

Agroforestry is 'win win' for bees and crops, study shows
Agroforestry has long been suggested as a solution to halt the decline of pollinators, yet observational studies in temperate climates have been virtually non-existent. New study shows planting woody plants alongside crops increases wild insect pollinator numbers and pollination. (2020-06-16)

Bumblebees speed up flowering
When pollen is in short supply, bumblebees damage plant leaves in a way that accelerates flower production, as an ETH research team headed up by Consuelo De Moraes and Mark Mescher has demonstrated. (2020-05-26)

When plant pollen scarce, bumblebees biting leaves causes flowers to bloom early
Facing a scarcity of pollen, bumblebees will nibble on the leaves of flowerless plants, causing intentional damage in such a way that accelerates the production of flowers, according to a new study, which reports on a previously unknown behavior of bumblebees. (2020-05-21)

'Bee' thankful for the evolution of pollen
Over 80% of the world's flowering plants must reproduce in order to produce new flowers, according to the US Forest Service. This process involves the transfer of pollen between plants by wind, water or insects called pollinators -- including bumblebees. In a new study, researchers at the University of Missouri discovered spiny pollen -- from a native wild dandelion species in the southern Rocky Mountains -- has evolved to attach to traveling bumblebees. (2020-05-20)

Pollinator-friendly flowers planted along with crops aid bumblebees
A new study reported this week by evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University, with others, suggests that flower strips -- rows of pollinator-friendly flowers planted with crops -- offer benefits for common Eastern bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) colony reproduction, but some plants do increase pathogen infection risk. (2020-05-14)

Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health. (2020-05-14)

Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Just a few weeks ago, everyone was talking about plummeting insect numbers. A team of researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL have now demonstrated for the first time that the diversity of food plants for insects in the canton of Zurich has dramatically decreased over the past 100 years or so. The study has now been published in 'Ecological Applications'. (2020-04-24)

Bumblebees aversion to pumpkin pollen may help plants thrive
Cornell University researchers have found that squash and pumpkin pollen have physical, nutritional and chemical defense qualities that are harmful to bumblebees. The results of their recent study suggest that deterring bumblebees from collecting and eating pollen may provide an evolutionary benefit to cucurbit plants. (2020-03-11)

Sugar-poor diets wreak havoc on bumblebee queens' health
UC Riverside study shows that without adequate sugar, a bumblebee queen's fat body, which functions like a human liver, does not correctly produce enzymes required for healthy metabolism and detoxification from pesticides. (2020-02-27)

Bumblebees recognize objects through sight and touch, a complex cognitive feat
Demonstrating an unprecedented degree of cognitive complexity in an insect, researchers report that bumblebees are capable of recognizing objects across senses. (2020-02-20)

Bumblebees can experience an object using one sense and later recognize it using another
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London and Macquarie University in Sydney have published new work in the journal Science showing that bumblebees can find objects in the dark they've only seen before. (2020-02-20)

Bumblebees carry heavy loads in economy mode
Bumblebees are the big lifters of the insect world, able to fly back to the hive with almost their own bodyweight in nectar on board. A study published Feb. 5 in Science Advances shows how they do it -- and that bees can show more flexibility in behavior than you might expect from a bumbling insect. (2020-02-05)

Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention
New research from UC Riverside shows, contrary to previous scientific belief, a hormone required for sexual maturity in insects cannot travel across the blood-brain barrier unless aided by a transporter protein. The finding may soon allow scientists to prevent disease-spreading mosquitoes from maturing, or to boost reproduction in beneficial bumblebees. (2020-01-28)

Study sheds light on 'overlooked' bee species
The UK's first citizen science project focusing on solitary, ground-nesting bees has revealed that they nest in a far broader range of habitats than previously thought. (2019-12-11)

Bumblebees exposed to Chernobyl-levels of radiation consume more nectar
Researchers at Stirling University have found that exposure to chronic low-dose radiation, found in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, negatively affects bumblebee energy use by increasing their metabolic rate and food consumption. The preliminary results will be presented on Dec. 12, at the British Ecological Society Annual Meeting in Belfast. (2019-12-11)

On balance, some neonicotinoid pesticides could benefit bees
The story of neonicotinoids is growing more nuanced. Europe has banned outdoor use of three of these insecticides to protect bee populations. Two other neonicotinoids are still permitted, but little is known about their impact on bees. New research reported in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology on one of the permitted neonicotinoids indicates it effectively controls pests and might even help bees. (2019-11-27)

The use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees, new study finds
Not all neonicotinoid insecticides have negative effects on bees, according to researchers at Lund University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Their new study indicates that the use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees and pollination. (2019-11-27)

Neonicotinoids: Despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Since 2013, a European Union moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides can still be detected in rape nectar from 48% of the plots of studied fields, their concentrations varying greatly over the years. (2019-11-27)

Queen bees face increased chance of execution if they mate with two males rather than one
Queen stingless bees face an increased risk of being executed by worker bees if they mate with two males rather than one, according to new research by the University of Sussex and the University of São Paulo. (2019-08-20)

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)

Managed apiaries may lead to higher rates of viral infection in wild bumblebees
Viral pathogens that might play a role in the decline in wild bumblebees may be transmitted from managed honeybees through flowers, according to a study published June 26 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Samantha Alger of the University of Vermont, and colleagues. (2019-06-26)

Honeybees infect wild bumblebees -- through shared flowers
Viruses in managed honeybees are spilling over to wild bumblebee populations though the shared use of flowers, a first-of-its-kind study reveals. This research suggests commercial apiaries may need to be kept away from areas where there are vulnerable native pollinator species, like the endangered rusty patched bumblebee. (2019-06-26)

Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk
A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows. (2019-06-12)

As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too
A new study from the University of California, Riverside, reveals the loss of plant diversity harms the humble bumble at a critical stage in its development from egg to adult. (2019-05-15)

The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them. (2019-05-01)

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