Current Burgess Shale News and Events

Current Burgess Shale News and Events, Burgess Shale News Articles.
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For selenium in rivers, timing matters
Researchers have gained new insight into an ongoing environmental health problem. (2021-02-23)

Shale gas development in PA increases exposure of some to air pollutants
Air pollution levels may have exceeded air quality standards during the development of some Marcellus Shale natural gas wells in Pennsylvania, potentially impacting more than 36,000 people in one year alone during the drilling boom, according to Penn State scientists. (2021-02-18)

Songbirds' reproductive success reduced by natural gas compressor noise
Some songbirds are not dissuaded by constant, loud noise emitted by natural gas pipeline compressors and will establish nests nearby. The number of eggs they lay is unaffected by the din, but their reproductive success ultimately is diminished. (2021-02-18)

Nanoengineered cement shows promise for sealing leaky gas wells
Leaking natural gas wells are considered a potential source of methane emissions, and a new nanomaterial cement mixture could provide an effective, affordable solution for sealing these wells, according to a team of Penn State scientists. (2020-12-14)

Incredible vision in ancient marine creatures drove an evolutionary arms race
Ancient deep sea creatures called radiodonts had incredible vision that likely drove an evolutionary arms race according to new research published today. (2020-12-02)

Worst-case emissions projections are already off-track
New University of Colorado Boulder research reveals that emissions are not growing as fast as the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's assessments have indicated--and that the IPCC is not using the most up-to-date climate scenarios in its planning and policy recommendations. (2020-11-30)

61 healthcare groups urge Congress to support implementing the physician fee schedule
Today, more than 60 healthcare stakeholders, representing Medicare providers, signed a letter urging congressional leaders to support bipartisan legislation that would implement the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's (CMS) Calendar Year 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) final rule as written. (2020-11-17)

Study reveals how to improve natural gas production in shale
A new hydrocarbon study contradicts conventional wisdom about how methane is trapped in rock, revealing a new strategy to more easily access the valuable energy resource. (2020-11-12)

Landscape to atomic scales: Researchers apply new approach to pyrite oxidation
Pyrite, or fool's gold, is a common mineral that reacts quickly with oxygen when exposed to water or air, such as during mining operations, and can lead to acid mine drainage. Little is known, however, about the oxidation of pyrite in unmined rock deep underground. (2020-10-29)

Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface. (2020-10-07)

A new way to solve thermal maturity of marine shales with high-over maturities
Maturity is important for petroleum source rock evaluation as well as shale oil and gas exploration. For Lower Paleozoic and Precambrian marine shales?big challenges exist for an exact measurement of maturity owing to the lack of distinguishable organic matter under optical microscopy, such as vitrinite and solid bitumen. Now researchers in Beijing have conducted a new method to solve this problem using laser Raman parameters of mineral-organic aggregation in shales. (2020-09-10)

Early Cambrian fossil discovery gives new understanding into the origin of hemichordates
A half-a-billion years old fossil species of marine animal sheds light on how the anatomies of the two main types of an animal group called the hemichordates are related, and provides new evidence in the historical debate among zoologists. The fossils are over half-a-billion years old and were discovered at a Burgess Shale site in the Canadian Rockies by scientists at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History and University of Montreal. (2020-08-27)

Study of natural gas flaring finds high risks to babies
Researchers from USC and UCLA have found that exposure to flaring -- the burning off of excess natural gas -- at oil and gas production sites is associated with 50% higher odds of preterm birth, compared with no exposure. (2020-07-15)

Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs
Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel. (2020-06-22)

Study evaluates stress level of rehabilitated sea turtles during transport
A new study co-authored by six scientists with the New England Aquarium has found that rehabilitated Kemp's ridley and loggerhead sea turtles experience a substantial stress response when transported to release locations in the southern United States but that the turtles remained physically stable and ready for release. (2020-06-16)

Bedrock type under forests greatly affects tree growth, species, carbon storage
A forest's ability to store carbon depends significantly on the bedrock beneath, according to Penn State researchers who studied forest productivity, composition and associated physical characteristics of rocks in the Appalachian ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania. (2020-06-10)

Ultrastable, selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation developed
A group of Japanese scientists has developed an ultrastable, selective catalyst to dehydrogenate propane - an essential process to produce the key petrochemical substance of propylene - without deactivation, even at temperatures of more than 600°C. (2020-06-05)

Solving the space junk problem
Aging satellites and space debris crowd low-Earth orbit, and launching new satellites adds to the collision risk. The most effective way to solve the space junk problem, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is not to capture debris or deorbit old satellites: it's an international agreement to charge operators 'orbital-use fees' for every satellite put into orbit. (2020-05-25)

Does MRI have an environmental impact?
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have surveyed the amount of gadolinium found in river water in Tokyo. Gadolinium is contained in contrast agents given to patients undergoing medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and it has been shown in labs to become toxic when exposed to ultraviolet rays. The researchers found significantly elevated levels, particularly near water treatment plants, highlighting the need for new public policy and removal technologies as MRI become even more commonplace. (2020-05-23)

Early humans thrived in this drowned South African landscape
An interdisciplinary, international team of scientists has reconstructed the paleoecology the Paleo-Agulhas Plain, a now-drowned landscape on the southern tip of Africa that was high and dry during glacial phases of the last 2 million years and may have been instrumental in shaping the evolution of early modern humans. (2020-05-15)

Catalyst opens door to more efficient, environmentally friendly ethylene production
Researchers have engineered a new catalyst that can more efficiently convert ethane into ethylene, which is used in a variety of manufacturing processes. The discovery could be used in a conversion process to drastically reduce ethylene production costs and cut related carbon dioxide emissions by up to 87%. (2020-04-24)

Tight spaces tip presence of petrochemicals
Rice University engineers put to rest a long-held theory about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance to detect oil and gas deposits in the nanoscale pores of shale formations. (2020-04-13)

Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction
A research team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) found that both lake and peat-forming forest ecosystems probably took as long as 10 million years to recover after the end-Permian mass extinction. (2020-04-03)

Sea otters, opossums and the surprising ways pathogens move from land to sea
A parasite known only to be hosted in North America by the Virginia opossum is infecting sea otters along the West Coast. A study from the University of California, Davis, elucidates the sometimes surprising and complex pathways infectious pathogens can move from land to sea to sea otter. (2020-03-19)

Mysterious ancient sea-worm pegged as new genus after half-century in 'wastebasket'
Fifty years ago, researchers placed a mystery worm in a 'wastebasket' genus and interest in the lowly critter waned -- until now. (2020-03-17)

Stone-age 'likes': Study establishes eggshell beads exchanged over 30,000 years
A clump of grass grows on an outcrop of shale 33,000 years ago. An ostrich pecks at the grass, and atoms taken up from the shale and into the grass become part of the eggshell the ostrich lays. (2020-03-09)

Paper: Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers
A new paper co-written by Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shows that the growing traffic burden in shale energy boomtowns from trucks hauling wastewater to disposal sites resulted in a surge of road fatalities and severe accidents. (2020-03-02)

Containing methane and its contribution to global warming
Methane is a gas that deserves more attention in the climate debate as it contributes to almost half of human-made global warming in the short-term. A new IIASA study shows that it is possible to significantly contribute to reduced global warming through the implementation of available technology that limits methane release to the atmosphere. (2020-02-28)

Study: The opioid crisis may be far worse than we thought
New research appearing in the journal Addiction shows that the number of deaths attributed to opioid-related overdoses could be 28% higher than reported due to incomplete death records. This discrepancy is more pronounced in several states, including Alabama, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and Indiana, where the estimated number of deaths more than doubles -- obscuring the scope of the opioid crisis and potentially affecting programs and funding intended to confront the epidemic. (2020-02-27)

Atomic structures mapped in measles, mumps, flu and RSV
Northwestern University researchers have, for the first time, determined the 3D atomic structure of a key complex in paramyxoviruses, a family of viruses that includes measles, mumps, human parainfluenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). (2020-02-17)

Shale drilling activity linked to increased sexually transmitted infections in Texas, Yale study
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that rates of two sexually transmitted infections (STIs), gonorrhea and chlamydia, are 15% and 10% higher, respectively, in Texas counties with high shale drilling activity (''fracking''), compared to counties without any fracking. (2020-02-13)

UTA study examines potential sources of groundwater contamination in private wells
A study led by environmental researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington suggests a disconnect between the perception of groundwater contamination and the extent to which that contamination is attributable to oil and natural gas extraction. (2020-02-06)

Airborne measurements point to low EPA methane estimates in south central US
Approximately twice as much methane is seeping into the atmosphere than the Environmental Protection Agency estimates from oil and gas facilities in the south central U.S., according to a series of measurements taken by meteorologists using NASA aircraft. (2020-01-27)

Effects of natural gas assessed in study of shale gas boom in Appalachian basin
A new study estimated the cumulative effects of the shale gas boom in the Appalachian basin in the early 2000s on air quality, climate change, and employment. The study found that effects on air quality and employment followed the boom-and-bust cycle, but effects on climate change will likely persist for generations to come. The study, which also considered how to compensate for these effects, provides insights for long-term decision making in this field. (2019-12-17)

New report: Teacher effectiveness has a dramatic effect on student outcomes
A new IZA World of Labor report publishing tomorrow, Dec. 5, 2019, finds teacher effectiveness to have a strong effect on pupils attainment. It goes on to look at ways to increase it including reforming hiring practices, and reforming teacher training and development. (2019-12-05)

Co-combustion of wood and oil-shale reduces carbon emissions
Utilization of fossil fuels, which represents an increasing environmental risk, can be made more environmentally friendly by adding wood -- as concluded based on the preliminary results of the year-long study carried out by thermal engineers of Tallinn University of Technology. In search of less polluting ways of energy production, increasing the amount of biomass as a source of raw materials offers a good way to use fossil fuels and reduce emissions. (2019-12-03)

Rocky Mountain not-so high: Oil, gas wells drive down Colorado home values, reveals WVU research
Heather Stephens, assistant professor of resource economics and management at West Virginia University, found that shale development negatively impacts house prices, particularly for houses with private water and close proximity to the mountains. (2019-11-12)

Replacing coal with gas or renewables saves billions of gallons of water
The transition from coal to natural gas in the US electricity sector is reducing the industry's water use, Duke University research finds. For every megawatt of electricity produced using natural gas instead of coal, the water withdrawn from rivers and groundwater drops by 10,500 gallons, and water consumed for cooling and other plant operations and not returned to the environment drops by 260 gallons. Switching to solar or wind power could boost these savings even more. (2019-10-21)

Startled fish escape using several distinct neuronal circuits
A fast knee-jerk 'ballistic' escape response and a more considered 'delayed' escape response are mediated by distinct and parallel neuronal pathways in zebrafish, according to a study published October 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Harold Burgess of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and colleagues. (2019-10-15)

Rest may help reduce PTSD symptoms, UCL study finds
A period of rest following a traumatic event can reduce the subsequent development of involuntary 'memory intrusions'*, one of the hallmark symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new UCL study has found. (2019-10-09)

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