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Study of auto recalls shows carmakers delay announcements until they 'hide in the herd'
Automotive recalls are occurring at record levels, but seem to be announced after inexplicable delays. A research study of 48 years of auto recalls announced in the United States finds carmakers frequently wait to make their announcements until after a competitor issues a recall - even if it is unrelated to similar defects. (2021-02-22)

Campaign promises more likely to be kept by governments run by women, research shows
Governments with strong female representation are more likely to deliver on campaign promises, according to new research from Rice University. (2021-02-22)

High-tech start-ups benefit from Twitter hype
Study shows correlation between Twitter sentiment and the valuation of start-ups by venture capitalists / Patents are stronger indicators of long-term success (2021-02-16)

Collagen structures get the royal reveal
An algorithm by Rice University scientists predicts the structures and melting temperatures of collagen, the triple helix that accounts for about a third of the body's proteins and forms the fibrous glue in skin, bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments. (2021-02-15)

Learn what you live? Study finds watching others can reduce decision bias
New research finds first evidence that watching and learning from others can help reduce bias and improve decision-making. In business, the results could help improve hiring practices or increase cost savings. (2021-02-11)

Creating more sustainable fragrances with biotech
In the face of a changing climate and crop diseases, manufacturers of products containing natural flavors and fragrances are pivoting to a new way to source ingredients. Companies have been partnering with biotechnology firms to manufacture scents and flavors using fermented microbes, which experts say are more sustainable. A new story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how the industry is brewing up new fragrances. (2021-02-10)

Small and medium-sized firms use social media to reach and persuade new customers
During the COVID-19 pandemic, small and medium-sized firms (SME) have become increasingly dependent on social media as a tool for their international sales process, according to a recent study published in International Business Review. Digital communication tools seem to be most prevalent in finding and reaching new prospects and in the persuasion phase, whereas more traditional communication tools still prevail in customer relationship management. (2021-02-09)

Potential for misuse of climate data a threat to business and financial markets
Climate information is at risk of being misconstrued and used inappropriately in financial reports and has the potential to expose businesses to significant risk, according to a new paper by Australian researchers. (2021-02-08)

Don't let pressure of one-upmanship dictate your gift selection
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon's Tepper School of Business and West Virginia University's John Chambers College of Business and Economics set out to understand gift giving dynamics in these settings and how a giver's and a recipient's evaluation of the giver's gift is influenced by the other gifts the recipient receives. (2021-02-01)

Scientists develop method to detect fake news
Social media is increasingly used to spread fake news. The same problem can be found on the capital market - criminals spread fake news about companies in order to manipulate share prices. Researchers at the Universities of Göttingen and Frankfurt and the Jožef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana have developed an approach that can recognise such fake news, even when the news contents are repeatedly adapted. The results of the study were published in the Journal of the Association for Information Systems. (2021-02-01)

Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ
Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that emotional intelligence - the ability to understand, use and manage emotions to relieve stress - may be more vital to a business' survival than previously thought. (2021-01-28)

Cannabis use both helps and hurts entrepreneurial creativity
When entrepreneurs dream up ideas for new businesses, cannabis use might help, and hinder, their creativity, according to a new study by WSU researchers. (2021-01-26)

To combat false news, correct after reading
A new study co-authored by MIT scholars finds that fact-checking labels, when attached to online news headlines, actually work better after people read false headlines, not when the labels precede the headline or accompany it. (2021-01-26)

Marketing has major benefits for entrepreneurs in emerging markets, study shows
New research from Notre Dame shows marketers can help entrepreneurs in emerging markets grow their businesses, which in turn helps them to improve lives, sustain livelihoods, enhance overall living standards and strengthen societies. (2021-01-26)

Abusive bosses 'fake nice' instead of 'make nice'
Rather than take steps to genuinely repair damage caused by their abusive behavior, such as offering sincere apologies, many of the bosses in this study were more concerned about repairing their social images. (2021-01-22)

Study finds bilateral agreements help developing economies spur foreign investment
Developing economies suffer from a paradox: they don't receive investment flows from developed economies because they lack stability and high-quality financial and lawmaking institutions, but they can't develop those institutions without foreign funds. A new study finds that bilateral investment treaties, known as BITs, can help developing economies overcome this paradox, but only as long as those countries can demonstrate a commitment to property and contract rights. (2021-01-21)

Delivering the news with humor makes young adults more likely to remember and share
Could the merging of humor and news actually help inform the public? New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania and the School of Communication at Ohio State University found that young people were more likely to remember information about politics and government policy when it was conveyed in a humorous rather than non-humorous manner. They were also more willing to share the information online. (2021-01-07)

Majority of biotech companies completing an IPO from 1997-2016 achieved product approvals
A large scale study from Bentley University of the biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings from 1997-2016 estimates that 78% of these companies are associated with products that reach phase 3 trials and 52% are associated with new product approvals. The article, titled 'Late-stage product development and approvals by biotechnology companies after IPO, 1997-2016,' shows that these emerging, public biotechnology companies continue to have a role in initiating new product development, but are no longer distinctively focused on novel, biological products. (2021-01-06)

Bosses need appreciation, too
'Tis the season to be grateful, even for your boss, according to a recent A new study suggests that when supervisors feel appreciated, it gives them a boost of energy and optimism. In the end, that's good for employees and the organization's bottom line. (2020-12-10)

Religious discrimination particularly high for Jews and Muslims, study shows
Although people of all faiths report growing religious discrimination during the past few years, the phenomenon is most common among Jews and Muslims, according to a new study from researchers at Rice University and West Virginia University (WVU). In addition, Jews and Muslims are much more likely to become victims of violence because of their religious beliefs. (2020-12-09)

'Pink tax' hurts female consumers, but electing more women combats it
The wage gap between men and women is no secret, but another form of gender discrimination directly and disproportionately affects women worldwide: the ''pink tax'' imposed by import tariffs that target female products. (2020-12-08)

Can gender inequality kill? Paper looks at impact among older Indian women
Indian women past childbearing age are dying at a higher rate than those in other countries because of poverty and limited access to resources such as food and health care, according to a study from Rice University, (2020-12-07)

Why untraceable cryptocurrencies are here to stay
Financial regulators have a wait and see approach to decentralized privacy-preserving cryptocurrencies, letting them mature before deciding how to regulate them. Yet they assume there will be some way for oversight in the future to track extraordinary transactions linked to organized crime, terrorism financing and money laundering. (2020-11-17)

Here's why conservatives and liberals differ on COVID-19
According to a new study from Lehigh Business, the differences between conservative and liberal responses to COVID-19 are mitigated when people perceive the virus itself to have agency -- the ability to control its own actions and thus exert power over people. Conservatives are generally more sensitive to threats that are relatively high in agency, say researchers with Lehigh University's College of Business and KU Leuven, Belgium. (2020-11-13)

Faster disclosure under RTRS delivering transparency that helps muni market stakeholders
University of Oregon researchers have found three-fold benefits when the gap in trade reporting in municipal bond markets changed from a full day to fifteen minutes after implementation of the Real-Time Transaction Reporting System. Municipalities, they report, can benefit from the real-time reporting system through more efficient capital markets, creating benefits for society because municipal bond offerings fund infrastructure investments that often improve quality of life, education and public safety. (2020-11-10)

Putting stock into Twitter: Social media can influence returns, WVU finance professor says
Alexander Kurov, Fred T. Tattersall Research Chair and Professor of Finance in the John Chambers College of Business and Economics, found that firm-level Twitter content has information useful for predicting next-day stock returns, and that it is a stronger predictor of returns for firms with less analyst coverage. (2020-11-09)

Luminescent wood could light up homes of the future
The right indoor lighting can help set the mood, from a soft romantic glow to bright, stimulating colors. But some materials used for lighting, such as plastics, are not eco-friendly. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a bio-based, luminescent, water-resistant wood film that could someday be used as cover panels for lamps, displays and laser devices. (2020-11-04)

Tricking fake news detectors with malicious user comments
New research from a team at Penn State's College of Information Sciences and Technology shows how these fake news detectors can be manipulated through user comments to flag true news as false and false news as true. This attack approach could give adversaries the ability to influence the detector's assessment of the story even if they are not the story's original author. (2020-11-04)

New study by ESMT Berlin shows political commitment increasingly important for CEOs
Political and social engagement is a relevant topic for European business leaders. CEOs are increasingly making public statements on political issues in order to make a positive contribution to socially relevant topics. These are the findings of a recent study at ESMT Berlin. (2020-11-02)

Mobile phones help Americans encounter more diverse news
Researchers at the Annenberg School for Communication analyzed the news consumption of tens of thousands of Americans over a five-year period on desktop computers, tablets, and mobile phones. They found that contrary to conventional wisdom, mobile devices expose Americans to a much greater variety of news, diversifying the stories that people encounter and their expanse of information sources. (2020-11-02)

Malaria test as simple as a bandage
A test for malaria looks like a bandage, but can diagnose the disease in minutes without the need for medical expertise or specialized equipment. (2020-11-02)

In a hurry to develop drugs? Here's your cHAT
Rice University scientists develop cHAT to simplify the reduction of alkenes to more useful intermediate molecules for drugs and other useful chemical compounds. (2020-10-30)

How initiatives empowering employees can backfire
Strategies meant to motivate people in the workplace may have unintended consequences -- depending on who's in charge. Recent research from Michigan State University shows that empowerment initiatives aren't necessarily the answer for business leaders hoping to motivate their employees. (2020-10-20)

Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth
Most people have seen or heard from a friend, neighbor or family member about a product or service they've used and how their experience was. It's called observational learning or word-of-mouth. These communications don't provide an unbiased assessment of true quality. Given this, businesses are faced with the difficult decision of determining when and how to spend their ad dollars. (2020-10-19)

Bisexual adults less likely to enjoy health benefits of education
Education has long been linked to health -- the more schooling people have, the healthier they are likely to be. But a new study from Rice University sociologists found that the health benefits of a good education are less evident among well-educated bisexual adults. (2020-10-15)

Pandemic-related stress leads to less employee engagement
As COVID-19 cases surged this spring, the pandemic led some people more than others to ponder their own mortality. A new study in China and the United States suggests that these people were the ones who showed the highest levels of stress and the least engagement at work. But the research also uncovered a bright spot: The right kind of boss helped reduce stress and increase engagement in their workers who were anxious about COVID-19. (2020-10-12)

UC study: More coverage of climate wanted
Large majorities of American news audiences care about climate change and want more information from the media on the topic, according to a new report from the University of Cincinnati, in partnership with Yale University and George Mason University. (2020-10-06)

There's a reason bacteria stay in shape
A simple theoretical model seeks to explain why bacteria remain roughly the same size and shape. The work by Rice University chemists could offer new insight into diseases, including cancer. (2020-10-06)

Study shows keeping gratitude journal reduces gossip, incivility in workplace
Gratitude interventions in the workplace can help employee well-being and managers can use these efforts to foster more respectful behavior in their teams. (2020-09-22)

Fast calculation dials in better batteries
A simpler and more efficient way to predict the performance of batteries will lead to better batteries, according to Rice University engineers. (2020-09-16)

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