Current Butterfly News and Events

Current Butterfly News and Events, Butterfly News Articles.
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Butterfly wing clap explains mystery of flight
The fluttery flight of butterflies has so far been somewhat of a mystery to researchers, given their unusually large and broad wings relative to their body size. Now researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied the aerodynamics of butterflies in a wind tunnel. The results suggest that butterflies use a highly effective clap technique, therefore making use of their unique wings. This helps them rapidly take off when escaping predators. (2021-01-20)

Male butterflies mark their mates with repulsive smell during sex to 'turn off' other suitors
Butterflies have evolved to produce a strongly scented chemical in their genitals that they leave behind after sex to deter other males from pursuing their women - scientists have found. Researchers discovered a chemical made in the sex glands of the males of one species of tropical butterfly is identical to a chemical produced by flowers to attract butterflies. The study published in PLOS Biology today (19 January 2021) identified a gene for the first time. (2021-01-19)

Astronomers dissect the anatomy of planetary nebulae using Hubble Space Telescope images
Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features. Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Green Bank Observatory presented new findings about the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) and the Jewel Bug Nebula (NGC 7027) at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. (2021-01-19)

CCNY's David Lohman finds Asian butterfly mimics different species as defense mechanism
Many animal and insect species use Batesian mimicry - mimicking a poisonous species - as a defense against predators. The common palmfly, Elymnias hypermnestra (a species of satyrine butterfly), which is found throughout wide areas of tropical and subtropical Asia, adds a twist to this evolutionary strategy: the females evolved two distinct forms, either orange or dark brown, imitating two separate poisonous model species, Danaus or Euploea. (2021-01-14)

Asian butterfly populations show different mimicry patterns thanks to genetic 'switch'
A new study by researchers at the University of Chicago and the City College of New York (CCNY) has identified a unique, genetic ''mimicry switch'' that determines whether or not male and female Elymnias hypermnestra palmflies mimic the same or different species of butterflies. (2021-01-13)

Asian butterfly mimics other species to defend against predators
Many animal and insect species use Batesian mimicry -- mimicking a poisonous species -- as a defense against predators. The common palmfly Elymnias hypermnestra -- a species of satyrine butterfly that is found throughout wide areas of tropical and subtropical Asia -- adds a twist to this evolutionary strategy. (2021-01-13)

Unsure how to help reverse insect declines? Scientists suggest simple ways
Entomologist Akito Kawahara's message is straightforward: We can't live without insects. They're in trouble. And there's something all of us can do to help. (2021-01-12)

Machine learning improves particle accelerator diagnostics
Operators of Jefferson Lab's primary particle accelerator are getting a new tool to help them quickly address issues that can prevent it from running smoothly. The machine learning system has passed its first two-week test, correctly identifying glitchy accelerator components and the type of glitches they're experiencing in near-real-time. An analysis of the results of the first field test of the custom-built machine learning system was recently published in the journal Physical Review Accelerators and Beams. (2021-01-05)

I see you: Honey bees use contagious and honest visual signal to deter attacking hornets
What do honey bees and deadly hornets have to do with issues surrounding ''fake news?'' UC San Diego-led research is providing new details about honey bees and their defenses against preying hornets. Using a common iPad, James Nieh and his colleagues conducted the first study that demonstrates that a contagious warning signal counters ''fake news'' in social insects. (2020-12-07)

New butterfly-inspired hydrogen sensor is powered by light
A new bioinspired prototype offers a total package of features unmatched by any hydrogen sensor currently on the market. While commercial hydrogen sensors only work at 150C or higher, the new tech is powered by light instead of heat. And the sensor can detect hydrogen at concentrations from as little as 10 ppm (for medical diagnoses) to 40,000 ppm (the level where the gas becomes potentially explosive). (2020-12-02)

Flow physics could help forecasters predict extreme events
Researchers are studying a tornado's song and other 'doors to danger' in an increasingly chaotic world. (2020-11-23)

Can animals use iridescent colours to communicate?
New paper sheds light on the colourful world of animal communication, highlighting the challenges of studying accurately how iridescent colours work in nature (2020-11-19)

The very hungry, angry caterpillars
In the absence of milkweed--their favorite food--monarch butterfly caterpillars (Danaus plexippus) go from peaceful feeders to aggressive fighters. Researchers reporting in the journal iScience on November 19 observed that caterpillars with less access to food were more likely to lunge at others to knock them aside, and caterpillars were most aggressive during the final stages before metamorphosis. (2020-11-19)

Very hungry and angry, caterpillars head-butt to get what they want
When food is scarce, monarch butterfly caterpillars go from docile to domineering. The results look something like a combination of boxing and ''bumper'' cars. The less food, the more likely caterpillars were to try to head-butt each other out of the way to get their fill, lunging and knocking aside other caterpillars to ensure their own survival. And, they are most aggressive right before the final stages of their metamorphosis. (2020-11-19)

Manchester group discover new family of quasiparticles in graphene-based materials
After years of dedicated research a group of pioneering scientists led by Nobel Laureate Andre Geim have again revealed a phenomenon that is 'radically different from textbook physics' and this work has led to the discovery and characterisation of a new family of quasiparticles found in graphene-based materials. Called Brown-Zak fermions these extraordinary particles have the potential to achieve the Holy Grail of 2D materials by having ultra-high frequency transistors which can in turn produce a new generation of superfast electronic devices. (2020-11-13)

Direct observation of a single electron's butterfly-shaped distribution in titanium oxide
A research team led by Nagoya University has observed the smeared-out spatial distribution of a single valence electron at the centre of a titanium oxide molecule, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a new Fourier synthesis method also developed by the team. The method can determine the orbital states in materials regardless of their physical properties and without the need for difficult experiments or analytical techniques. The work was published recently in Physical Review Research. (2020-10-28)

Butterfly color diversity due to female preferences
Butterflies have long captured our attention due to their amazing color diversity. But why are they so colorful? A new publication led by researchers from Sweden and Germany suggests that female influence butterfly color diversity by mating with colorful males. (2020-10-27)

Now you see it, now you don't: Hidden colors discovered by coincidence
Scientists in Australia have stumbled across an unusual way to observe colour that had previously gone unnoticed. An example of a process called scattering, the effect occurs in some materials when light interference combines with strong electric fields. The findings, which have been published in the journal Advanced Optical Materials, have expanded our understanding of the behaviour and properties of light, and could also have practical applications in sensing technology and security devices. (2020-10-14)

Native milkweed cultivars planted by the public can support monarch butterflies and bees
Millions of people plant pollinator gardens in an effort to provide monarch butterflies with food along their annual migration route from overwintering sites in the highland forests of central Mexico to summer breeding grounds in the United States and southern Canada. For the first time, entomologists studied how effective native milkweed cultivars in small gardens are at attracting and supporting monarchs - their results suggest that this can be a valuable additional food source. (2020-10-07)

'Cool' sampling sites more likely to show false trends
Data collected by citizen science initiatives, museums and national parks is an important basis for research on biodiversity change. However, scientists found that sampling sites are oftentimes not representative, which may lead to false conclusions about how biodiversity changes. Their research, published in Conservation Biology, calls for more objective site selection and better training for citizen scientists to prevent a site-selection bias. (2020-09-29)

How does this blue flower tea change color? (video)
Maybe you've seen a beautiful, color-changing tea on social media. Chances are, it's butterfly pea flower tea. This week, we're investigating what allows it to shift from one vibrant color to the next, and Sam and George play around to see how many different colors they can get. (2020-09-28)

Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change, say scientists
Researchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature. Species that rely most on finding a suitably shady location to keep cool are at the greatest risk of population decline. The results predict how climate change might impact butterfly communities, and will inform conservation strategies to protect them. (2020-09-24)

Biologists developing global citizen network to monitor insect abundance
A University of Arkansas biologist is part of an international team of researchers is building a volunteer network of citizen scientists to help monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies. (2020-09-16)

Computational modelling explains why blues and greens are brightest colous in nature
Researchers have shown why intense, pure red colours in nature are mainly produced by pigments, instead of the structural colour that produces bright blue and green hues. (2020-09-11)

Over a century later, the mystery of the Alfred Wallace's butterfly is solved
An over a century-long mystery has been surrounding the Taiwanese butterfly fauna ever since the 'father of zoogeography' Alfred Russel Wallace described a new species of butterfly: Lycaena nisa, whose identity was only re-examined in a recent project looking into the butterflies of Taiwan. Based on the original specimens, in addition to newly collected ones, Dr Yu-Feng Hsu of the National Taiwan Normal University resurrected the species name and added two new synonyms to it. (2020-09-10)

Quantum shake
There they were, in all their weird quantum glory: ultracold lithium atoms in the optical trap operated by UC Santa Barbara undergraduate student Alec Cao and his colleagues in David Weld's atomic physics group. Held by lasers in a regular, lattice formation and ''driven'' by pulses of energy, these atoms were doing crazy things. (2020-09-09)

New subspecies of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly found in the Arctic Circle of Yakutia
An isolated population of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly species: the Arctic Apollo (Parnassius arcticus), turned out to be a new to science subspecies with distinct looks as well as DNA. Specimens had been collected during a 2019 field trip to northeastern Yakutiya (Russia), a ''real blank spot'' in terms of biodiversity research. The unique butterfly is described by Russian scientists in a recent paper, published in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal Acta Biologica Sibirica. (2020-09-08)

In butterfly battle of sexes, males deploy 'chastity belts' but females fight back
Some male butterflies seal their mate's genitalia with a waxy 'chastity belt' to prevent future liaisons. But female butterflies can fight back. Could this sexual one-upmanship ultimately result in new species? (2020-09-03)

Vagabonding female butterflies weigh in on reproductive strategies
A new study by researchers from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bengaluru, published today in the Royal Society's journal Biology Letters, shows that dispersals, when undertaken by butterflies in search of unpredictable resources, selectively burden the egg-carrying females on their long flights. (2020-08-19)

Findings refute idea of monarchs' migration mortality as major cause of population decline
Research shows that the decline in the monarchs' overwintering numbers is not due to an increase in the deaths of monarchs during the migration. The main determinant of yearly variation in overwintering population size is the size of the summer monarch butterfly population. (2020-08-17)

Metallic blue fruits use fat to produce color and signal a treat for birds
Researchers have found that a common plant owes the dazzling blue colour of its fruit to fat in its cellular structure, the first time this type of colour production has been observed in nature. (2020-08-06)

Rethink needed for treatment of Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa
Concerns over ineffective traditional treatments have prompted calls to better understand the complex processes underpinning Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa (SE-AN). SE-AN is a subgroup of people whose anorexia nervosa has become chronic, severe, and enduring - and while traditional clinical models of treatment for eating disorders focus on medical recovery, many people in this subgroup never recover in medical terms. (2020-08-05)

Plant size and habitat traits influence cycad susceptibility to invasive species
A long-term study on cycads in Guam has revealed how rapidly invasive species devastated the native Cycas micronesica species and the key factors that have influenced the plant's mortality. The research -- conducted by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam and the College of Micronesia-FSM -- is published in the May 2020 issue of Diversity, a peer-reviewed journal published by MDPI. (2020-08-03)

Simulating quantum 'time travel' disproves butterfly effect in quantum realm
Using a quantum computer to simulate time travel, researchers have demonstrated that, in the quantum realm, there is no 'butterfly effect.' In the research, information--qubits, or quantum bits--'time travel' into the simulated past. (2020-07-29)

Butterfly genomics: Monarchs migrate and fly differently, but meet up and mate
A new study confirms that while the eastern and western butterflies fly differently, they are genetically the same. The journal Molecular Ecology published the findings, led by evolutionary biologists at Emory University. (2020-07-29)

New genome mapper is like "upgrading from dial-up to fibre-optic"
Researchers describe the first technology able to visualize hundreds to potentially thousands of genomes at the same time under the microscope. (2020-07-27)

Butterfly wings inspiring next-gen technological innovations
The global energy shortages, environmental degradation and deteriorating healthcare are causing devastating effects to human life. The inherent properties of butterfly wings offer promising solutions to counter these effects through the fabrication of wing architecture inspired sensors and energy harnessing systems. Researchers in China have summarized the recent classification of butterfly wing architectures and explored sensor and energy applications inspired by butterfly wings. (2020-07-14)

Motions in the Sun reveal inner workings of sunspot cycle
The Sun's convection zone plays a key role in the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field. Analyzing data sets spanning more than 20 years researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, the University of Göttingen and New York University Abu Dhabi obtain the most comprehensive picture of the north-south flow of plasma in the convection zone ever. The flow goes around the convection zone in each hemisphere in about 22 years. (2020-06-25)

Agricultural conservation schemes not enough to protect Britain's rarest butterflies
Conservation management around the margins of agriculture fail to protect butterfly species at greatest risk from the intensification of farming, a new study says. (2020-06-23)

Hubble provides holistic view of stars gone haywire
As nuclear fusion engines, most stars live placid lives for hundreds of millions to billions of years. But near the end of their lives they can turn into crazy whirligigs, puffing off shells and jets of hot gas. Hubble has dissected such crazy fireworks in two nearby young planetary nebulas. (2020-06-18)

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