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Current Calcium News and Events, Calcium News Articles.
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Making bones is less difficult than was previously thought
The way in which bone formation occurs needs to be redefined. This was revealed by Radboud university medical center researchers and their colleagues in a publication in Nature Communications. It turns out that bone formation does not require complex biomolecules in collagen at all. This means that the production of bone substitutes and biomaterials is less complicated than was previously thought. (2020-10-08)

Memory of the Venus flytrap
In a study to be published in Nature Plants, a graduate student Mr. Hiraku Suda and Professor Mitsuyasu Hasebe of the National Institute for Basic Biology (NIBB) in Okazaki, Japan, together with their colleagues, have succeeded in visualizing intracellular calcium concentrations in the Venus flytrap and have demonstrated that its short-term memory can indeed be explained by changes in calcium concentration. (2020-10-05)

Risk of heart disease in breast cancer patients can be predicted from routine scans
Automated analysis of breast cancer patients' routine scans can predict which women have a greater than one in four risk of going on to develop cardiovascular disease, according to research presented at the 12th European Breast Cancer Conference. (2020-10-01)

Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue. (2020-09-30)

Could your menopause symptoms be hard on your heart?
Menopause is accompanied by numerous symptoms that can interfere with a woman's quality of life, but can they also cause health problems? A new study suggests that they can, with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in women who have two or more moderate to severe symptoms. Study results will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), opening on September 28. (2020-09-28)

Lipids, lysosomes, and autophagy: The keys to preventing kidney injury
Lysosomes are cellular waste disposal organelles containing potent enzymes that cause cellular damage if they leak out of ruptured lysosomes. In a recent study led by Osaka University, researchers found that several distinct pathways involved in the repair or elimination of damaged lysosomes work together in response to lysosomal damage. The proper activation and function of these pathways was essential for preventing kidney injury in a mouse model of oxalate crystal-induced kidney damage. (2020-09-28)

Twinkling, star-shaped brain cells may hold the key to why, how we sleep
A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons. The study builds new momentum toward ultimately solving the mystery of why we sleep and how sleep works in the brain. The discovery may also set the stage for potential future treatment strategies for sleep disorders and neurological diseases and other conditions associated with troubled sleep. (2020-09-24)

Regulatory T cells could lead to new immunotherapies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis
In a new University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers have discovered how regulatory T cells (Treg) are instrumental in limiting the damage caused to the spinal cord in diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). (2020-09-21)

What happens between the sheets?
Adding calcium to graphene creates an extremely-promising superconductor, but where does the calcium go? In a new study, a Monash-led team has for the first time confirmed what actually happens to those calcium atoms. Surprising everyone, the calcium goes underneath both the upper graphene sheet and a lower 'buffer' sheet, 'floating' the graphene on a bed of calcium atoms. (2020-09-17)

Sugar promotes sperm longevity in pig reproductive tract
For many livestock species, artificial insemination (AI) is standard. But it can be tricky to achieve success the first time, thanks to variability in ovulation timing across the herd. A new University of Illinois study identifies a naturally occurring sugar that slows the maturation of sperm in pigs, opening up the possibility of extending sperm storage time within the female reproductive tract and increasing the chances of successful fertilization through AI. (2020-09-17)

Bioactive nano-capsules to hijack cell behavior
Many diseases are caused by defects in signaling pathways of body cells. In the future, bioactive nanocapsules could become a valuable tool for medicine to control these pathways. Researchers from the University of Basel have taken an important step in this direction: They succeed in having several different nanocapsules work in tandem to amplify a natural signaling cascade and influence cell behavior. (2020-09-14)

Structure of ATPase, the world's smallest turbine, solved
The chemical ATP, adenosine triphosphate, is the fuel that powers all life. Despite ATP's central role, the structure of the enzyme generating ATP, F1Fo-ATP synthase, in mammals, including humans, has not been known so far. Now, scientists from IST Austria report the first complete structure of the mammalian F1Fo-ATP synthase. This structure also settles a debate on how the permeability transition pore, a structure involved in cell death, cancer, and heart attacks, forms. (2020-09-14)

Stronger bones thanks to heat and microbiota
Osteoporosis is characterised by a deterioration of the bones and an increased risk of fractures. With one third of postmenopausal women affected, it is a major public health problem. A research team from the University of Geneva has observed that exposure to warmer ambient temperatures increases bone strength and prevents the loss of bone density. This phenomenon is linked to a change in the composition of gut microbiota and makes hopes for osteoporosis treatments. (2020-09-11)

Parasitic plants attack crops when defending themselves from microbes
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have discovered a link between defensive responses in plants and the beautiful but devastating crop parasite witchweed. Published in Nature, the new study shows that both parasitic and non-parasitic plants can detect and react to a class of organic compounds called quinones. While parasitic plants sense quinones in their prey and use it to invade, quinones trigger defensive responses in non-parasitic plants that can protect them from bacteria and other microbes. (2020-09-02)

Revisiting ratios
There's more to seawater than salt. Ocean chemistry is a complex mixture of particles, ions and nutrients. And for over a century, scientists believed that certain ion ratios held relatively constant over space and time. (2020-09-01)

How plants shut the door on infection
A new study by an international team including University of Maryland scientists has discovered the key calcium channel responsible for closing plant pores as an immune response to pathogen exposure. The findings are a major step toward understanding the defense mechanisms plants use to resist infection, which could eventually lead to healthier, more resistant and more productive crops. (2020-08-26)

How plants close their gates when microbes attack
Like humans, plants protect themselves against pathogens. An international consortium under the lead of UZH professor Cyril Zipfel has now identified a long sought-after factor of this plant immune system: The calcium channel triggers the closure of stomata upon contact with microbes such as bacteria. This innate defense mechanism could help to engineer crop plants that are resistant to pathogens. (2020-08-26)

Research illuminates new element of plant immune defense response to biotic stress
A collaboration between scientists with the Vidali at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas in Madrid resulted in the first article addressing the involvement of cytosolic calcium oscillations and waves in the immune response of P. patens to a biotic stress. Specifically, the scientists administered chitin oligosaccharides to simulate a fungal infection. (2020-08-26)

None of the most common blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, some lowered the risk
Among the 41 most common blood pressure medications, none of them raised the risk of depression, according to an analysis from Denmark. The study also found that some high blood pressure medications lowered the risk of depression. These findings may help guide medical professionals in selecting the right hypertension medication, particularly for people with a personal or family history of depression. (2020-08-24)

Broccoli and Brussels sprouts a cut above for blood vessel health
New research from Edith Cowan University has shown some of our least favourite vegetables could be the most beneficial when it comes to preventing advanced blood vessel disease. (2020-08-20)

Scan for arterial plaque is better at predicting heart attack than stroke
The amount of calcified plaque in the heart's arteries is a better predictor of future heart attacks than of strokes, with similar findings across sex and racial groups, according to new research from UT Southwestern. (2020-08-18)

Biomedical scientists piece together how medication paralyzes parasitic worms
A new study upends the widely held belief that a medication used to treat lymphatic filariasis doesn't directly target the parasites that cause the disease. The research shows the medication, diethylcarbamazine, temporarily paralyzes the parasites. (2020-08-18)

Nitrate supplementation could help breathing and lung clearance in the elderly
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology shows that nitrate improves function in the diaphragm, the muscle involved in coughing and breathing, by improving power. The study done in old mice, if replicated in humans, could provide a strategy for helping elderly people clear the lungs more effectively and avoid infection. (2020-08-16)

A phylogenetic analysis reveals the evolution of the mitochondrial calcium transporter
The system that regulates cellular calcium levels duplicated, generating two non-equivalent systems, some one billion years ago before fungi and animals diverged evolutionarily. The fungal models currently used for the study of mitochondrial calcium regulation are not adequate, as the system they possess is not equivalent to that of animals. Chytrids, a divergent group of fungi, would be the only fungi that possess a system similar to ours. (2020-08-12)

Exact climate data from the past
Corals and cave carbonates can reveal the temperatures that prevailed at the Earth's surface at the time they formed. An international team of geoscientists led by Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany, has developed a new method that makes it possible to identify whether the composition of these deposits was exclusively controlled by temperature, or if the formation process itself exerted an additional control. The new method allows scientists to determine past Earth surface temperatures more reliably. (2020-08-10)

Detailed molecular workings of a key system in learning and memory formation
UMass Amherst biochemist Margaret Strattob and colleagues report how they used advanced sequencing technology to clear up uncertainty and determine all variants of a single protein/enzyme known as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the hippocampus, the brain's memory center. (2020-08-10)

Calcium-rich supernova examined with x-rays for first time
X-ray images give unprecedented view of extremely rare type of supernova. New information suggests that these supernovae start as compact stars that lose mass at the end of life. Calcium-rich supernovae are responsible for up to half the calcium in the entire universe. SN 2019ehk has the richest calcium emission of all known transients (2020-08-05)

Calcium-rich supernova examined with X-rays for first time
New findings reveal that a calcium-rich supernova is a compact star that sheds an outer layer of gas during the final stages of its life. When the star explodes, its matter collides with the loose material in that outer shell, emitting bright X-rays. The overall explosion causes intensely hot temperatures and high pressure, driving a chemical reaction that produces calcium. (2020-08-05)

Alteration of calcium channel signaling may explain mechanism of autism spectrum disorder
Based on altering calcium channel kinetics and gene activation exhibited by the Timothy mutant, these results provide insight into the cellular mechanism that allows predicting disease risk, and genetic diagnosis of individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. (2020-08-03)

Calcium and vitamin D nutrient deficiencies lead to higher risk for osteoporosis
Research article in the journal PLoS ONE examines inadequate nutrient intake and its relationship to poor bone health, specifically risk of osteoporosis. The research was a cross sectional analysis of the U.S population from NHANES. (2020-07-28)

Not just light: The sensitivity of photoreceptors to mechanical stimuli is unveiled
''We thought we knew almost everything about photoreceptors, but we have proved that is not the case''. With these words, Vincent Torre, Professor of neurobiology of SISSA, comments the results of a new study that, thanks to a multidisciplinary approach and to the use of optical tweezers, reveals for the first time the sensitivity of nerve cells present on the retina to mechanical stimuli and opens up new questions on how they function. The work has been published in PLOS Biology. (2020-07-27)

Immune system -- Knocked off balance
Instead of protecting us, the immune system can sometimes go awry, as in the case of autoimmune diseases and allergies. An Ludwig-Maximilian-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team has dissected how mast cells regulate their calcium levels to keep the immune response under control. (2020-07-23)

L-type calcium channel blockers may contribute to heart failure, study finds
Researchers found that in rats and human cells in vitro, LCCBs cause changes in blood vessels -- known as vascular remodeling -- that reduce blood flow and increase pressure. Examining epidemiological data, the team also found that LCCBs are associated with a greater risk for heart failure. The findings suggest that care should be taken when prescribing these drugs to patients, particularly older adults and those with advanced hypertension. (2020-07-23)

Calcium channel subunits play a major role in autistic disorders
Neurobiologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have found new evidence that specific calcium channel subunits play a crucial role in the development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. (2020-07-22)

Starve the cancer
Fighting cancer often means employing a suite of techniques to target the tumor and prevent it from growing and spreading to other parts of the body. It's no small feat -- the American Cancer Society predicts roughly 1.8 million new cases of cancer in the country in 2020, underscoring the need to identify additional ways to outsmart the runaway cells. (2020-07-21)

Yale researchers discover potential treatment for rare degenerative disease
Yale pharmacology professor Barbara Ehrlich and her team have uncovered a mechanism driving a rare, lethal disease called Wolfram Syndrome and also a potential treatment. Their findings appear in the July 6 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020-07-16)

Making balanced decisions
How decisions are made and how behavior is controlled is one of the most important questions in neuroscience. The neurotransmitter dopamine plays a central role in all of this. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), together with researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, looked into the role that dopamine plays in the decision-making process and in controlling movement. (2020-07-15)

A new role for a tiny linker in transmembrane ion channels
In a study of large-conductance potassium (BK) channela, Jianhan Chen and colleagues UMass Amherst and Washington University report in eLife that their experiments have revealed 'the first direct example of how non-specific membrane interactions of a covalent linker can regulate the activation of a biological ion channel.' (2020-07-09)

New link between calcium and cardiolipin in heart defects
To function properly, the heart needs energy from cells' powerhouses, the mitochondria. In turn, mitochondria boost their energy output when calcium levels rise around them, a signal that more energy is needed. A new study shows that a shortage of cardiolipin, a type of fat, in the mitochondrial membrane, prevents calcium from entering mitochondria. The result helps explain heart and muscle weakness in the rare genetic disorder Barth syndrome. (2020-07-07)

Coronary calcium scoring: Personalized preventive care for those most at risk
An imaging test called coronary calcium scoring can help doctors to make the right recommendation about the use of statin therapy. The test is a 10-minute CT (computed tomography) scan looking for calcium deposits in the arteries supplying blood to the heart. Calcium deposits indicate the presence of coronary plaque, also known as atherosclerosis. (2020-07-06)

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