Current Cambridge News and Events

Current Cambridge News and Events, Cambridge News Articles.
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First COVID-19 lockdown cost UK hospitality and high street £45 billion in turnover, researchers estimate
However, UK supermarkets and online retailers made an additional £4 billion each thanks to the coronavirus lockdown that began in March last year, according to recent estimates. (2021-02-18)

Lab-grown 'mini-bile ducts' used to repair human livers in regenerative medicine first
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have used a technique to grow bile duct organoids - often referred to as 'mini-organs' - in the lab and shown that these can be used to repair damaged human livers. This is the first time that the technique has been used on human organs. (2021-02-18)

New method developed for 'up-sizing' mini organs used in medical research
A team of engineers and scientists has developed a method of 'multiplying' organoids: miniature collections of cells that mimic the behaviour of various organs and are promising tools for the study of human biology and disease. (2021-02-08)

Study highlights risk of new SARS-CoV-2 mutations emerging during chronic infection
SARS-CoV-2 mutations similar to those in the B1.1.7 UK variant could arise in cases of chronic infection, where treatment over an extended period can provide the virus multiple opportunities to evolve, say scientists. (2021-02-05)

High schoolers discover four exoplanets through Harvard and Smithsonian mentorship program
They may be the youngest astronomers to make a discovery yet. This week, 16-year-old Kartik Pinglé and 18-year-old Jasmine Wright have co-authored a peer-reviewed paper in The Astronomical Journal describing the discovery of four new exoplanets about 200-light-years away from Earth. (2021-01-28)

SHEA releases COVID-19 research agenda identifying gaps in knowledge
Massive amounts of COVID-19 research has been published since the pandemic began, but much more study is needed to understand how to prevent, identify, and treat the virus. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America is publishing a COVID-19 research agenda outlining 10 areas where we need to learn more to fight COVID-19 and future pandemics. (2021-01-21)

Scientists present novel approach for monitoring freshwater health
Researchers have used the world's smallest, smartphone-sized DNA sequencing device to monitor hundreds of different bacteria in a river ecosystem. (2021-01-19)

DNA test can quickly identify pneumonia in patients with severe COVID-19, aiding faster treatment
Researchers have developed a DNA test to quickly identify secondary infections in COVID-19 patients, who have double the risk of developing pneumonia while on ventilation than non-COVID-19 patients. (2021-01-15)

Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from the University of Cambridge, the University of Milan and Google Research have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds. (2021-01-14)

Mindfulness can improve mental health and wellbeing -- but unlikely to work for everyone
Mindfulness courses can reduce anxiety, depression and stress and increase mental wellbeing within most but not all non-clinical settings, say a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge. They also found that mindfulness may be no better than other practices aimed at improving mental health and wellbeing. (2021-01-11)

'Virtual biopsies' could replace tissue biopsies in future thanks to new technique
A new advanced computing technique using routine medical scans to enable doctors to take fewer, more accurate tumour biopsies, has been developed by cancer researchers at the University of Cambridge. This is an important step towards precision tissue sampling for cancer patients to help select the best treatment. In future the technique could even replace clinical biopsies with 'virtual biopsies', sparing patients invasive procedures. (2021-01-06)

Survey shows dicamba may reduce the effectiveness of junglerice controls
A recent survey featured in the journal Weed Technology explores the prevalence of junglerice in cotton and soybean crops and whether dicamba interferes with the effectiveness of herbicides used to control the weed. (2020-12-15)

Study shows the impact of genetic diversity on effective alligatorweed control
New research featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management (IPSM) shows that genetics matter when it comes to the effective control of alligatorweed, an invasive plant found in or near aquatic settings (2020-12-15)

Apathy could predict onset of dementia years before other symptoms
Apathy -- a lack of interest or motivation -- could predict the onset of some forms of dementia many years before symptoms start, offering a 'window of opportunity' to treat the disease at an early stage, according to new research from a team of scientists led by Professor James Rowe at the University of Cambridge. (2020-12-14)

Nursing homes may misinterpret mental changes, falls as infection
There is a widespread belief that a change in the mental status or an increase in falls in a nursing home resident may indicate an underlying infection. This contributes to the overuse of antibiotics, according to revised clinical guidance by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The guidance, published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, outlines criteria on evaluating non-localizing symptoms as indicators of infection. (2020-12-09)

Gut research identifies key cellular changes associated with childhood-onset Crohn's Disease
Scientists have tracked the very early stages of human foetal gut development in incredible detail, and found specific cell functions that appear to be reactivated in the gut of children with Crohn's Disease. The results are an important step towards better management and treatment of this devastating condition. (2020-12-07)

Ethnic minorities face rising disparity in homicide risk across England and Wales
Calculations now familiar from coronavirus coverage - cases per 100,000 people - applied to ethnicity and homicide victimisation in the UK for the first time. So far this century, Black Britons have been over five and a half times more likely to become murder victims than White British people. Researchers call on ONS and police forces to calculate and present more 'meaningful' crime data to aid prevention and public understanding. (2020-11-17)

Novel glass materials made from organic and inorganic components
Researchers from the Universities of Jena and Cambridge have succeeded in creating a new class of hybrid glass materials that combine organic and inorganic components. To do this, the scientists use special material combinations in which chemical bonds between organometallic and inorganic glasses can be generated. They included materials composed of organometallic networks. This is primarily because their framework structures can be created in a targeted manner. (2020-11-16)

Scientific journal launches new series on the biology of invasive plants
The journal Invasive Plant Science and Management (IPSM) announced the launch of a new series focused on the biology and ecology of invasive plants. (2020-11-16)

The future's uncertain - but noradrenaline can help us adapt
A brain chemical called noradrenaline is responsible for our responses to uncertain situations - helping us to learn quickly and adapt our behaviour, a new study has found. (2020-11-13)

Computer vision app allows easier monitoring of diabetes
A computer vision technology developed by University of Cambridge engineers has now been developed into a free mobile phone app for regular monitoring of glucose levels in people with diabetes. (2020-11-13)

CrystEngComm celebrates the CSD in a special issue
The journal CrystEngComm has published a special issue to mark the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) reaching 1 million structures, with 33 papers that highlight the breadth of applications made possible with this data. (2020-11-10)

Female mongooses start battles for chance to mate
Female banded mongooses lead their groups into fights then try to mate with enemy males in the chaos of battle, new research shows. (2020-11-09)

Technique to regenerate optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment
Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. (2020-11-05)

SARS-CoV-2 uses 'genome origami' to infect and replicate inside host cells
Scientists at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with Justus-Liebig University, Germany, have uncovered how the genome of SARS-CoV-2 - the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 - uses genome origami to infect and replicate successfully inside host cells. (2020-11-05)

Focus on COVID-19 deaths in under-65s for better insights into infection rates
Simply comparing the total number of deaths across countries may provide a misleading representation of the underlying level of transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, because of large differences in reported COVID-19 death rates in elderly populations in different countries. (2020-11-02)

Giving the immune system a double boost against cancer
Cancer immunotherapies are very effective for some patients, but many cancers do not respond to the currently available treatments. Researchers are developing a new approach that expands the number of treatable tumor types. (2020-10-30)

Study of COVID-19 levels in oncology staff suggests need for more extensive testing
A study of oncology staff carried out immediately after the spring peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK indicates that many had been infected with the coronavirus as they tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies. This included staff who did not show any symptoms. (2020-10-29)

Age and pre-existing conditions increase risk of stroke among COVID-19 patients
Fourteen out of every 1,000 COVID-19 patients admitted to hospital experience a stroke, a rate that is even higher in older patients and those with severe infection and pre-existing vascular conditions, according to a report published this week. (2020-10-28)

Single brain region links depression and anxiety, heart disease, and treatment sensitivity
Over-activity in a single brain region called the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) underlies several key symptoms of mood and anxiety disorders, but an antidepressant only successfully treats some of the symptoms. A new study, published today in the journal Nature Communications, suggests that sgACC is a crucial region in depression and anxiety, and targeted treatment based on a patient's symptoms could lead to better outcomes. (2020-10-26)

Tiny golden bullets could help tackle asbestos-related cancers
Gold nanotubes - tiny hollow cylinders one thousandth the width of a human hair - could be used to treat mesothelioma, a type of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos, according to a team of researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Leeds. (2020-10-26)

'Mini-lungs' reveal early stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection
'Mini-lungs' grown from tissue donated to Cambridge hospitals has provided a team of scientists from South Korea and the UK with important insights into how COVID-19 damages the lungs. Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell, the researchers detail the mechanisms underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection and the early innate immune response in the lungs. (2020-10-22)

Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. (2020-10-19)

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science. The SHEA White Paper, ''Management of Healthcare Personnel Living with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus in United States Healthcare Institutions,'' was published online in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-10-14)

Popularity of COVID-19 conspiracies and links to vaccine 'hesitancy' revealed by international study
Study of UK, US, Ireland, Mexico and Spain suggests ''Wuhan lab'' myth is seen as reliable by between a fifth and a third of populations. Older people and those who are good with numbers are better at spotting fake coronavirus news, according to research. People who rate coronavirus conspiracy theories as more reliable say they are much less likely to get vaccinated. (2020-10-13)

New virtual reality software allows scientists to 'walk' inside cells
Virtual reality software which allows researchers to 'walk' inside and analyze individual cells could be used to understand fundamental problems in biology and develop new treatments for disease. (2020-10-12)

Game 'pre-bunks' COVID-19 conspiracies as part of UK's fight against fake news
Cambridge research shows a 'pre-bunk' game can reduce susceptibility to fake news for up to three months after just one play. Latest findings come as new Go Viral! game is launched in partnership with the UK Government to fight the spread of COVID-19 false information. * The games let users play the role of a fake news producer so they can understand how misinformation is circulated online. (2020-10-09)

Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers
Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations - which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to anger - may be because they are 'rehearsing' strategies to cope with hot-headed friends. (2020-10-06)

Imaging technique could replace tissue biopsies in assessing drug resistance in cancer
Imaging techniques could replace the need for invasive tissue biopsies in helping rapidly determine whether cancer treatments are working effectively, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2020-10-06)

Studies explore the role of cover crops in suppressing glyphosate-resistant horseweed
Horseweed is considered one of the most troublesome weeds in the United States and Canada - able to produce devastating losses in both corn and soybean yields when left uncontrolled. Two recent studies - one published by the journal Weed Science and the other by the journal Weed Technology - provide insights on the role cover crops might play in controlling horseweed and reducing the need for herbicides. (2020-10-05)

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