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Current Cambridge News and Events, Cambridge News Articles.
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3D printed 'invisible' fibers can sense breath, sound, and biological cells
From capturing your breath to guiding biological cell movements, 3D printing of tiny, transparent conducting fibres could be used to make devices which can 'smell, hear and touch' -- making it particularly useful for health monitoring, Internet of Things and biosensing applications. (2020-09-30)

Scientists present a comprehensive physics basis for a new fusion reactor design
As part of the Journal of Plasma Physics' continuing focus on the scientific progress in fusion physics, the journal editors and Cambridge University Press are proud to present an important Special Issue of JPP, the 'Status of the SPARC Physics Basis'. (2020-09-29)

New method developed to help scientists understand how the brain processes color
Through the development of new technology, University of Minnesota researchers have developed a method that allows scientists to understand how a fruit fly's brain responds to seeing color. (2020-09-29)

Study suggests elderly care home outbreaks in England were caused by multiple indepedent infections and also within-home spread
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Congress on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) shows that outbreaks of COVID-19 in elderly care homes were caused by multiple independent infections from outside, plus within care home spread. There is also evidence of transmission between residents and healthcare workers, including paramedics, possibily linking care home outbreaks to hospital outbreaks. (2020-09-23)

SHEA endorses requiring recommended vaccinations for healthcare personnel, educators and students
All healthcare personnel should be immunized against vaccine preventable diseases recommended by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (CDC/ACIP) as a condition of employment, according to a new policy statement by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The broad statement of support of the vaccination recommendations, published in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, suggests medical contraindications as the only exception to receiving recommended immunizations. (2020-09-17)

Research explores factors influencing soybean injury by synthetic auxin herbicides
Synthetic auxin products have given growers an important option for managing weed populations resistant to glyphosate and other herbicides. But according to an article featured in the journal Weed Technology, there is one important downside to dicamba, 2,4-D and other synthetic auxins. They often move off-target and can cause severe injury to sensitive plants growing nearby. (2020-09-14)

ARPA-type funding gives green technology an 'innovation advantage', study finds
Startups funded by US energy agency ARPA-E file patents at twice the rate of similar cleantech firms, according to latest research. UK should trial its own climate-focused ARPA as part of Covid-19 recovery package, argues Cambridge researcher. Learn lessons from US by supporting startups through ''valley of death'' to boost productivity and innovation in green tech. (2020-09-14)

Guidance balances staph infection prevention in critically ill infants with family contact
NICUs should balance prevention of Staph infections in critically ill infants with the need for skin-to-skin contact with parents and siblings, according to a Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America white paper published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. The paper serves as a clinical companion to the new recommendations from the CDC's Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee to help clinicians in NICUs make decisions about infection prevention, detection, and control practices. (2020-09-14)

Computational modelling explains why blues and greens are brightest colous in nature
Researchers have shown why intense, pure red colours in nature are mainly produced by pigments, instead of the structural colour that produces bright blue and green hues. (2020-09-11)

Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The results are published in the journal Autism. (2020-09-10)

Cancer drug can rebalance kidney function in a devastating genetic disease
Researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Zurich have discovered that a drug newly approved for cancer improves kidney dysfunction in a mouse model of Dent disease 2 and Lowe syndrome (2020-09-09)

Genome sequencing accelerates cancer detection
Recent cancer studies have shown that genomic mutations leading to cancer can occur years, or even decades, before a patient is diagnosed. Researchers have developed a statistical model that analyses genomic data to predict whether a patient has a high or low risk of developing oesophageal cancer. The results could enable early detection and improve treatment of oesophageal cancer in future. (2020-09-07)

Genetic information can predict predisposition to rare and common blood diseases
Two large-scale genetic studies have identified the bulk of genetic variation that influences medically-important characteristics of our blood cells. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and colleagues from 101 research institutions world-wide, have studied hundreds of thousands of participants and identified over 7,000 regions of the human genome that control blood cell characteristics, such as the numbers of red and white cells. (2020-09-03)

Combining PCR and antibody tests at point of care dramatically increases COVID-19 detection
A Cambridge hospital has piloted the use of combined rapid point-of-care nucleic acid and antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection after researchers at the University of Cambridge showed that this approach was superior to virus detection alone for diagnosing COVID-19 disease. (2020-09-02)

First complete dinosaur skeleton ever found is ready for its closeup at last
The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than a century and a half ago. (2020-08-27)

New insights into lithium-ion battery failure mechanism
Researchers have identified a potential new degradation mechanism for electric vehicle batteries - a key step to designing effective methods to improve battery lifespan. (2020-08-25)

Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal -- study
Researchers have identified the optimal dish positions to help ''nudge'' diners into picking more planet-friendly meals in cafeterias. Findings are the latest from Cambridge research on encouraging dietary decision-making that supports sustainable living. (2020-08-13)

Coffee stains inspire optimal printing technique for electronics
Using an alcohol mixture, researchers modified how ink droplets dry, enabling cheap industrial-scale printing of electronic devices at unprecedented scales. (2020-08-12)

Transgender and gender-diverse individuals more likely to be autistic
Transgender and gender-diverse adults are three to six times more likely as cisgender adults (individuals whose gender identity corresponds to their sex assigned at birth) to be diagnosed as autistic, according to a new study by scientists at the University of Cambridge's Autism Research Centre. (2020-08-07)

Metallic blue fruits use fat to produce color and signal a treat for birds
Researchers have found that a common plant owes the dazzling blue colour of its fruit to fat in its cellular structure, the first time this type of colour production has been observed in nature. (2020-08-06)

Study suggests embryos could be susceptible to coronavirus
Genes that are thought to play a role in how the SARS-CoV-2 virus infects our cells have been found to be active in embryos as early as during the second week of pregnancy, say scientists at the University of Cambridge and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The researchers say this could mean embryos are susceptible to COVID-19 if the mother gets sick, potentially affecting the chances of a successful pregnancy. (2020-08-04)

Four-stranded DNA structures found to play role in breast cancer
Four stranded DNA structures - known as G-quadruplexes - have been shown to play a role in certain types of breast cancer for the first time, providing a potential new target for personalised medicine, say scientists at the University of Cambridge. (2020-08-03)

Immune cell steroids help tumours suppress the immune system, offering new drug targets
Tumours found to evade the immune system by telling immune cells to produce immunosuppressive steroids. Researchers discovered that immune T cells from mouse skin and breast tumours secrete steroids, and that preventing this steroid production reduced growth of tumours in mice. The study found that either removing a key steroid-producing gene, or switching it off with a drug, dramatically slowed the formation or progression of cancers, revealing potential immunotherapy drug targets. (2020-07-30)

New drug targets for lethal brain cancer discovered
More than 200 genes with novel and known roles in glioblastoma - the most aggressive type of brain cancer - offer promising new drug targets. Researchers from the Sanger Institute and their collaborators engineered a new mouse model to show for the first time how a mutation in the well-known cancer gene, EGFR initiates glioblastoma, and works with a selection from more than 200 other genes to drive the cancer. (2020-07-29)

Gene variations at birth reveal origins of inflammation and immune disease
A study published in the journal Nature Communications has pinpointed a number of areas of the human genome that may help explain the neonatal origins of chronic immune and inflammatory diseases of later life, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. (2020-07-28)

Researchers find evidence of smallpox in the viking age
The fatal disease smallpox is older and more widespread than scientists so far have proved. A new study by an international team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the University of Cambridge shows that the Vikings also suffered from smallpox. (2020-07-23)

Genetic variant may explain why some women don't need pain relief during childbirth
Women who do not need pain relief during childbirth may be carriers of a key genetic variant that acts a natural epidural, say scientists at the University of Cambridge. In a study published today in the journal Cell Reports, the researchers explain how the variant limits the ability of nerve cells to send pain signals to the brain. (2020-07-21)

Scientists supercharge shellfish to tackle vitamin deficiency in humans
Cambridge scientists have developed a new way to fortify shellfish to tackle human nutrient deficiencies which cause severe health problems across the world. The team is now working with major seafood manufacturers to further test their microencapsulation technology, or ''Vitamin Bullets''. (2020-07-19)

Study shows how our brains remain active during familiar, repetitive tasks
New research, based on earlier results in mice, suggests that our brains are never at rest, even when we are not learning anything about the world around us. (2020-07-14)

Rapid genome sequencing and screening help hospital manage COVID-19 outbreaks
Cambridge researchers have shown how rapid genome sequencing of virus samples and enhanced testing of hospital staff can help to identify clusters of healthcare-associated COVID-19 infections. (2020-07-14)

Apathy not depression helps to predict dementia
Apathy offers an important early warning sign of dementia in individuals with cerebrovascular disease, but depression does not, new research led by the University of Cambridge suggests. (2020-07-13)

People with coronavirus symptoms more likely to have psychiatric disorders and loneliness
People who have or had COVID-19 symptoms are more likely to develop general psychiatric disorders and are lonelier, with women and young people more at risk, says a just-published study co-authored at Cambridge Judge Business School. (2020-07-13)

Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life
People who work in jobs that require less physical activity - typically office and desk-based jobs - are at a lower risk of subsequent poor cognition than those whose work is more physically active, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. (2020-07-07)

Cell 'membrane on a chip' could speed up screening of drug candidates for COVID-19
Researchers have developed a human cell 'membrane on a chip' that allows continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with our cells, and may soon be used to test potential drug candidates for COVID-19. (2020-07-06)

Playtime with dad may improve children's self-control
Children whose fathers make time to play with them from a very young age may find it easier to control their behaviour and emotions as they grow up, research suggests. (2020-06-29)

New heart valve could transform open heart surgery for millions of patients globally
A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. The team's latest in-vitro results, published in Biomaterials Science, suggest that the PoliValve could last for up to 25 years. (2020-06-29)

Cancer study shows how chemicals cause complex cell mutations
Fresh insights into why some harmful substances are so efficient at causing cancer could aid the quest for better treatments. New research reveals how chemicals can cause changes in cells to help them dodge the body's immune system and build resistance to cancer drugs. Scientists tracked the impact of a toxic substance - similar to compounds found in tobacco, exhaust and some plants - to better understand how chemicals cause mutations in our cells' DNA. (2020-06-24)

Striking differences revealed in COVID-19 mortality between NHS trusts
A University of Cambridge team led by Professor Mihaela van der Schaar and intensive care consultant Dr Ari Ercole of the Cambridge Centre for AI in Medicine (CCAIM) is calling for urgent research into the striking differences in COVID-19 deaths they have discovered between the intensive care units of NHS trusts across England. (2020-06-23)

Healthcare facilities rapidly adapt & refine practices based on new evidence & supply shortages
Healthcare epidemiologists report using unprecedented methods in response to the unique circumstances resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the results of a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Healthcare epidemiologists have been at the center of hospitals' responses to the challenges presented by limited supplies and emerging evidence. These professionals have used resourceful strategies to keep healthcare personnel and patients safe. (2020-06-23)

Physical activity prevents almost 4 million early deaths worldwide each year
At least 3.9 million early deaths are being averted worldwide every year by people being physically active, according to a new study using data from 168 countries, and published in The Lancet Global Health by researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh. By showing how many deaths are averted, it might also be possible to frame the debate in a positive way and this could have benefits to advocacy, policy and population messaging. (2020-06-17)

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