Current Canada News and Events

Current Canada News and Events, Canada News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Study finds even the common house sparrow is declining
A new study by Cornell Lab of Ornithology scientists aims to clarify the status of the non-native European House Sparrow, using 21 years of citizen science data from the Cornell Lab's Project FeederWatch. (2021-02-11)

Gender gap: Women represent two-thirds of doctorates, only one-third of academic jobs
Women today represent two-thirds of all Canadian doctorates in archaeology, but only one-third of Canadian tenure-stream faculty. While men with Canadian PhDs have done well in securing tenure-track jobs in Canada over the past 15 years, women have not, according to a new study from McGill University. The current COVID-19 pandemic is likely to exacerbate these existing inequalities. (2021-02-11)

Women's voices in the media still outnumbered by those of men - study
New research from Simon Fraser University shows that women's voices continue to be underrepresented in the media, despite having prominent female leaders across Canada and internationally. Researchers in SFU's Discourse Processing Lab found that men outnumber women quoted in Canadian news media about three to one. The findings from the team's Gender Gap Tracker study were published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-05)

More mammals are being struck by aircraft each year
Investigators have published a global review of mammal strikes with aircraft, noting that events have been increasing by up to 68% annually. More mammals were struck during the landing phase of an aircraft's rotation than any other phase, according to the article published in Mammal Review. (2021-02-03)

Neuromuscular disease registry helps patients access research, clinical trials, new genetic tests, and therapies
Amsterdam, February 2, 2021 - The Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry (CNDR) was launched in 2010 to increase efficient patient access to cutting-edge research and clinical trials, to increase understanding of the natural history and epidemiology of neuromuscular disease across Canada, and to facilitate research collaboration. (2021-02-02)

Alternate type of surgery may prevent total knee replacement
An underused type of knee surgery in younger patients, called high tibial osteotomy, shows considerable success in reducing the need for total knee replacement, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200934. (2021-02-01)

Roadblocks to success for PhD grads could mean missed opportunities for Canada
Canada could be sitting on a significant untapped resource, as the number of PhD holders in this country rises, but persistent barriers make it hard for them to put their skills to work. According to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), PhD graduates play a critical role in the Canadian economy, but many are missing out on important opportunities to contribute their expertise and bolster growth and innovation. (2021-01-26)

Dinosaur embryo find helps crack baby tyrannosaur mystery
They are among the largest predators ever to walk the Earth, but experts have discovered that some baby tyrannosaurs were only the size of a Border Collie dog when they took their first steps. (2021-01-25)

Methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells underestimated
A recent McGill study published in Environmental Science and Technology finds that annual methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas (AOG) wells in Canada and the US have been greatly underestimated - by as much as 150% in Canada, and by 20% in the US. Indeed, the research suggests that methane gas emissions from AOG wells are currently the 10th and 11th largest sources of anthropogenic methane emission in the US and Canada, respectively. (2021-01-19)

New study compiles four years of corn loss data from 26 states and Ontario, Canada
Plant pathologists working at universities across 26 corn-producing states in the United States and in Ontario, Canada, compiled data about annual corn reductions caused by diseases. Estimated loss from each disease varied greatly by region. (2021-01-15)

Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in medicine
Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in health care to address its harmful effects on people's health, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201579 (2021-01-11)

Progress made on youth drowning in Aust, NZ, Canada - but more work required
Ten years of data from Australia, New Zealand and Canada reveals a drop in drowning deaths among people under 20 - but a large increase in drowning for adolescent females and First Nations peoples. (2021-01-11)

Child marriage is legal and persists across Canada
Canada is at the forefront of global efforts to end child marriage abroad. Yet this practice remains legal and persists across the country. In Canada, more than 3,600 marriage certificates were issued to children, usually girls, under the age of 18 between 2000 and 2018, according to a new study from researchers at McGill University. In recent years, an increasing number of child marriages have been common-law unions. (2021-01-08)

Trench fever in urban people who are homeless
A disease common during the First World War, trench fever, has been found in some urban populations experiencing homelessness in Canada, and physicians should be aware of this potentially fatal disease, highlights a practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-12-07)

Bleach-alternative COVID-19 surface disinfectants may pollute indoor air: USask research
Cleaning surfaces with hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants has the potential to pollute the air and pose a health risk, according to research led by University of Saskatchewan (USask). (2020-12-01)

Recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfi
Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete. Researchers at UBC Okanagan's School of Engineering conducted side-by-side comparisons of recycled and conventional concrete within two common applications--a building foundation and a municipal sidewalk. They found that the recycled concrete had comparable strength and durability after five years of being in service. (2020-11-30)

Insulators in Alberta at higher risk of chest infections, COPD: study
Construction workers in Alberta, Canada who work with hazardous insulation materials are much more likely to be affected by repeated chest infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. (2020-11-26)

Association between nursing home crowding, COVID-19 infection, mortality in Ontario, Canada
Researchers examined the association between nursing home crowding and COVID-19 across the entire nursing home system of Ontario, Canada, during the first months of the pandemic. (2020-11-09)

$1 million to support manufacturing of COVID-19 treatments, vaccines at uOttawa, Ottawa Hospital
Researchers from the University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital have been awarded $1,050,000 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation to support facilities for manufacturing innovative treatments and vaccines for COVID-19. (2020-11-09)

Expensive gene therapies raise challenges and opportunities: Expert panel report
Gene therapies are being approved for use in Canada, but could strain healthcare budgets and exacerbate existing treatment inequities across the country. However, there are opportunities to control spending, streamline approvals and support fair access through innovation, coordination and collaboration, according to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). (2020-11-03)

Key populations for early COVID-19 immunization in Canada
Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends vaccinating key populations, such as people at risk of severe illness or death, those at risk of transmitting the virus and essential workers, during the initial rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine in Canada. The preliminary guidance, developed for the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-11-03)

Canada should approve HIV self-testing
Canada should integrate self-testing for HIV into the health system to help reduce the burden of the disease, argues a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201160. (2020-11-02)

Ontario should vaccinate newborns for hepatitis B, study suggests
Not all pregnant women are universally screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Ontario, even though this screening is recommended, and the majority of those who test positive do not receive follow-up testing or interventions, leading to infections of newborns, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-10-26)

Researchers find consistent mercury levels in arctic seals
Ringed seals and other Arctic marine mammals are important in the diet of Arctic Indigenous peoples. A study spanning 45 years of testing indicates that mercury concentrations in ringed seals from the Canadian Arctic have remained stable, showing very limited declines over time. (2020-10-07)

Mask mandates shown to significantly reduce spread of COVID-19
A new study by Simon Fraser University researchers has found clear evidence that wearing a mask can have a significant impact on the spread of COVID-19. (2020-10-06)

Expert opinion: COVID-19 vaccine rollout unlikely before fall 2021
Experts working in the field of vaccine development tend to believe that an effective vaccine is not likely to be available for the general public before the fall of 2021. In a paper published this week in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, a McGill-led team published the results of a recent survey of 28 experts working in vaccinology. (2020-10-01)

Inequalities in premature deaths have increased between the rich and poor in Canada
Socioeconomic inequalities in premature deaths in Canada have increased over the last 25 years, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191723. (2020-09-28)

Education: an influencing factor for intergenerational mobility in Canada
The relationship between the income levels of parents and their children once they reach adulthood is complex, but education could be one of the factors that influence Canadian intergenerational mobility. (2020-09-25)

COVID-19 and the decolonization of Indigenous public health
Indigenous self-determination, leadership and knowledge have helped protect Indigenous communities in Canada during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and these principles should be incorporated into public health in future, argue the authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200852. (2020-09-21)

Suspension of fertility treatments during COVID-19 has mental health impacts
The suspension of fertility treatments due to the COVID-19 pandemic has had a variety of psychological impacts on women whose treatments were cancelled, but there are several protective factors that can be fostered to help in the future, according to a new study by Jennifer Gordon and Ashley Balsom of University of Regina, Canada, published 18 September in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2020-09-21)

Canadian researchers identify four barriers to use of 'gold-standard' abortion pill
Canada is the first country to facilitate provision of medical abortion in primary care settings through evidence-based deregulation of mifepristone, which is considered the 'gold standard' for medical abortion. A Canadian study investigated the factors that influence successful initiation and ongoing provision of medical abortion services among Canadian health professionals and how these factors relate to abortion policies, systems and service access throughout the country. (2020-09-15)

Patient access to after-hours primary care could prevent some less urgent ER visits
Patients who receive in-home nursing care have lower emergency room utilization if they have access to after-hours primary care. Previous research found that home nursing patients in Ontario, Canada, have an increased risk of visiting the ER after normal clinic hours on the same day they receive a home nursing visit. These ER visits may be linked to the visiting nurse identifying a health issue they are unable to appropriately address during the visit. (2020-09-15)

The widespread footprint of blue jean microfibers
With many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, blue jeans are a more popular wardrobe choice than ever. But most people don't think about microscopic remnants of their comfy jeans and other clothing that are shed during laundering. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected indigo denim microfibers not only in wastewater effluent, but also in lakes and remote Arctic marine sediments. (2020-09-02)

One quarter of prescription drugs in Canada may be in short supply
Research from the Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (CHÉOS) sheds new light on the factors behind drug shortages in Canada, a common problem across the country. (2020-09-01)

There's a shortage of info on drugs for children in Canada
The research team manually reviewed monographs of all new drugs approved by Health Canada between 2007 and 2016. During this time, Health Canada approved 281 drugs, 270 of which had clear benefit for children. However, only 75 (28 per cent) of the drug monographs were approved for children and there were only 10 (4 per cent) drugs approved for use in newborns. (2020-09-01)

Graduate student names new trace fossil discovered during coursework
University of Alberta graduate student Scott Melnyk made an intriguing fossil find during a graduate level course--and ended up identifying the fossilized tracks of a newly discovered wood-boring organism in a new study. (2020-09-01)

Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more then the usual suspects, study shows
What do lynx, flying squirrels, ravens, and wolverines have in common? They will all scavenge from snowshoe hare carcasses under the right conditions, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. And they're not alone. In fact, researchers documented 24 different species feeding from snowshoe hare carcasses in Canada's northern boreal forest. (2020-08-13)

Scientists develop first quantum algorithm to characterize noise across large systems
Quantum systems are notoriously prone to errors and noise. In order to overcome this and build a functional quantum computer, physicists should ideally understand the noise across an entire system. That has been out of reach until now, with Dr Robin Harper and colleagues developing the first system-wide quantum algorithm to characterise noise. (2020-08-10)

Study: Most Americans don't have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income
A new study from Oregon State University found that 77% of low- to moderate-income American households fall below the asset poverty threshold, meaning that if their income were cut off they would not have the financial assets to maintain at least poverty-level status for three months. (2020-08-06)

Women skip medications more in the US than other countries
For patients, especially those living with chronic conditions, nonadherence to prescription medicines due to cost is a common problem. By not filling prescriptions, skipping doses, delaying refills, or splitting pills, patients risk compromising the therapeutic benefit of their treatments. To understand the extent of this problem, researchers studied survey data from 11 high-income countries. They found that the largest disparities for non-adherence occurred among younger women in the U.S. (2020-08-03)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.