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Current Cancer Cells News and Events, Cancer Cells News Articles.
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Bacterial degradation of the MYC oncogene -- a new cancer treatment strategy?
Scientists at Lund University have discovered how E. coli bacteria target and degrade the well-known oncogene MYC, which is involved in many forms of cancer. The study is now published in Nature Biotechnology. (2021-02-12)

New class of drug leads to 30% reduced risk of death for bladder cancer patients
A new type of drug that helps target chemotherapy directly to cancer cells has been found to significantly increase survival of patients with the most common form of bladder cancer, according to results from a phase III clinical trial led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust. (2021-02-12)

Get a load of ZIF! Better delivery of cancer immunotherapy
An antibody loaded onto a porous metal organic framework is released by the acidic environment that surrounds tumors, avoiding the adverse effects of administering the antibody alone. (2021-02-11)

Study identifies never-before-seen dual function in enzyme critical for cancer growth
In developing therapies for hard-to-treat breast and ovarian cancers in patients with BRCA gene mutations, scientists aim to identify ways to keep cancer cells from using DNA break repair pathways. New findings demonstrate a previously-unknown capability for polymerase theta (pol theta) - a key enzyme in this repair function - that shows promise as a new avenue for treatment development. (2021-02-11)

SRC-3 is a novel regulator of human immune T regulatory cells
SRC-3, a prognostic marker for aggressive human breast and other cancers, also regulates human immune T regulatory cells (Tregs), which are involved in fighting cancer. (2021-02-11)

A new strategy to destroy cancer cells using magnetic nanoparticles and fields
The scientists analyzed how magnetic nanoparticles can be manipulated in in vitro conditions to achieve a selective antitumor effect. The method is based on the combined action of nanoparticles and permanent magnetic fields on human tumor cells. (2021-02-11)

STING activation reduces graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researcher Yongxia Wu, Ph.D., identified a new target molecule in the fight against graft-versus-host disease. (2021-02-11)

Researchers find parallels in spread of brain cancer in mammals, zebrafish
Virginia Tech scientists have identified a new zebrafish model that could help advance glioblastoma multiforme research. Glioblastoma is an aggressive form of primary brain tumor - fewer than one in 20 patients survive five years after diagnosis. (2021-02-11)

Why Black men's prostate cancer may be more responsive to immunotherapy
Black men die more often of prostate cancer yet have greater survival benefits from immunotherapy treatment. A new study discovered the reason appears to be an increase of a surprising type of immune cell in the tumor. The findings could lead to immune-based precision medicine treatment for men of all races with localized aggressive and advanced prostate cancer. (2021-02-10)

Anti-cancer drug's mode of operation deciphered
Freiburg researchers show how the membrane protein CD20 keeps the immune system's antibody-producing cells in check. (2021-02-10)

Brain tumor study reveals surprising gene deletion and method to overcome drug resistance
Experts at Cincinnati Children's report success at averting drug resistance in a subtype of brain tumors called glioblastomas. Importantly, the research indicates that the approach may also work in other cancers, such as melanoma, that exhibit a similar pathway of drug resistance. (2021-02-10)

How cells recycle the machinery that drives their motility?
Research groups at University of Helsinki and Institut Jacques Monod, Paris, discovered a new molecular mechanism that promotes cell migration. The discovery sheds light on the mechanisms that drive uncontrolled movement of cancer cells, and also revises the 'text book view' of cell migration. (2021-02-09)

Known tumour suppressor gene found essential for development, regeneration&stress-response
- Experiments carried out in the Drosophila fly have led to the identification of the headcase (hdc) gene as pivotal for adult progenitor cells, allowing them to undergo metamorphosis and give rise to adult tissue structures. - The study by IRB Barcelona's Development and Morphogenesis in Drosophila lab has been published in PLOS Genetics. (2021-02-09)

New study discovers possible early detection method for elusive ovarian cancer
A study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School found a way to detect the presence of ovarian cancer in patients using Pap test samples, normally used to detect cervical cancer. (2021-02-09)

Drug is promising against pancreatic and breast cancers
The drug is effective at treating pancreatic cancer and prolonging survival in mice, according to a study published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. A second study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows the drug is also effective against triple-negative breast cancer, a fast-growing and hard-to-treat type of breast cancer that carries a poor prognosis. Clinical trials are set to begin in 2021. (2021-02-09)

Winner-takes-all synthetic gene circuit process opens new pathways to disease treatment
Multicellular synthetic circuits will be a much more effective way to treat cancer. (2021-02-08)

Identification of three genes that determine the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells
Tissue stem cells can self-renew and differentiate, supplying cells necessary for tissues at various developmental stages. However, detailed analysis in vivo is difficult, so the molecular mechanisms underlying the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells have remained a mystery. Here, by using organoids that mimic tissue structure and function in vivo and GeCKO screening to inactivate arbitrary genes, Alk, Bclaf3 and Prkra have been identified as genes regulating stemness. (2021-02-08)

Halt cell recycling to treat cancer
Targeting and changing autophagy, otherwise known as cell recycling, has been linked to helping control or diminish certain cancers. Now, University of Cincinnati researchers have shown that completely halting this process in a very aggressive form of breast cancer may improve outcomes for patients one day. (2021-02-08)

Technion researchers discover new pathway for attacking cancer cells
The folate cycle is a process essential to DNA and RNA production. As a result, it is highly important to both cancer cells and healthy cells. Because DNA production is a critical stage in cell division, and thus in tumor growth, the folate cycle is a common target for chemotherapy. However, for the very same reason, there are significant side effects to attacking it. (2021-02-05)

Today's stem cell special: Small intestine on a plate!
A team of scientists from Japan have found success in growing small intestinal cells, akin to those found in the human body, from human-induced pluripotent stem cells. The scientists used a procedure they previously developed on embryonic stem cells for this discovery. They claim that the grown cells can be used for laboratory studies focusing on human small intestinal drug transport and metabolism. (2021-02-05)

New biomarker may predict which pancreatic cancer patients respond to CD40 immunotherapy
Inflammation in the blood could serve as a new biomarker to help identify patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who won't respond to the immune-stimulating drugs known as CD40 agonists, suggests a new study from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania published in JCI Insight. (2021-02-04)

How elephants evolved to become big and cancer-resistant
In this new study, 'We explored how elephants and their living and extinct relatives evolved to be cancer-resistant,' says University at Buffalo biologist Vincent Lynch. He adds, regarding the findings, 'Elephants have lots and lots and lots of extra copies of tumor suppressor genes, and they all contribute probably a little bit to cancer resistance.' (2021-02-04)

Fecal microbiota transplants help patients with advanced melanoma respond to immunotherapy
For patients with cancers that do not respond to immunotherapy drugs, adjusting the composition of microorganisms in the intestines--known as the gut microbiome--through the use of stool, or fecal, transplants may help some of these individuals respond to the immunotherapy drugs, a new study suggests. Researchers at the NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, conducted the study in collaboration with investigators from UPMC Hillman Cancer Center at the University of Pittsburgh. (2021-02-04)

Role of cell cycle on analyzing telomerase activity with a fluorescence off-on system
Traditional detecting techniques for telomerase activity are mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based classic telomeric repeat amplification protocols (TRAPs) and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). However, those methods were mainly relied on the analysis of asynchronous cells with different phases of cell cycle, the heterogeneous behavior of cell cycle were overlooked, which might affect the accuracy of their detection results. (2021-02-04)

Researchers assess cognitive impairment in patients with breast cancer
A recent analysis of published studies in Psycho-Oncology estimates that one-quarter of adults with breast cancer have cognitive impairment before starting therapy. (2021-02-03)

More than half of cancer survivors have underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID
New study finds more than half (56.4%) of cancer survivors in the United States reported having additional underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID-19 illness. (2021-02-03)

Modern anti-cancer drugs work via tiny molecular motions
Modern immunotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs support a natural mechanism of the immune system to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. They dock onto a specific receptor of the killer cell and prevent it from being switched off by the cancer cells. In a molecular dynamics study scientists from MedUni Vienna and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (Boku) Vienna, have analysed this mechanism for the drugs nivolumab and pembrolizumab. (2021-02-03)

Moffitt researchers discover mechanism that regulates anti-tumor activity of immune cells
In a new article published in Nature, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers demonstrate why some ovarian cancer patients evolve better than others and suggest possible approaches to improve patient outcomes. (2021-02-03)

Popular breast cancer drugs don't work the way we thought they did
New research suggests that a class of drugs called PARP inhibitors, designed to treat hereditary forms of ovarian and breast cancer, don't work the way we thought they did. It also paints a fuller picture of how they work, opening the door to improvements in next-generation drugs. (2021-02-03)

Study examines role of biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury in cancer patients
A study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in Kidney International Reports finds that immune checkpoint inhibitors, may have negative consequences in some patients, including acute kidney inflammation, known as interstitial nephritis. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are used to treat cancer by stimulating the immune system to attack cancerous cells. (2021-02-03)

MSK scientists learn how genes and environment conspire in pancreatic cancer development
Both genes and environment are necessary to trigger pancreatic cancer development. A new study from Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers explains why. (2021-02-03)

Senolysis by glutaminolysis inhibition ameliorates various age-associated disorders
A collaborative research group led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) has identified an inhibitor of the glutamate metabolic enzyme GLS1 so that its administration selectively eliminates senescent cells in vivo. They confirmed that the GLS1 inhibitor eliminated senescent cells from various organs and tissues in aged mice, ameliorating age-associated tissue dysfunction and the symptoms of obese diabetes, arteriosclerosis, and NASH. The results of this research were published in 'Science' on January 15, 2021. (2021-02-03)

Imaging identifies breast cancer patients unlikely to benefit from hormone therapy
Hormone therapy can be very effective for so-called estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. But it only works for a little more than half of women who receive the treatment. In a small study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that women whose tumors did not respond to a one-day estrogen challenge did not benefit from hormone therapy. The findings could help doctors choose treatments most likely to help their patients. (2021-02-02)

Study shows aspirin before a diagnosis may lower colorectal cancer mortality
A new study finds that long-term aspirin use before a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) may be associated with lower CRC-specific mortality. (2021-02-02)

Breast cancer-on-a-chip for testing immunotherapy drugs
A collaborative team from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI) successfully designed and tested a breast cancer-on-a-chip and rapid assay for screening immunotherapy drugs. (2021-02-02)

When hyperactive proteins trigger illnesses
Autoimmune diseases, in which the body's own immune system attacks healthy tissue, can be life-threatening and can impact all organs. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now found a possible cause for these self-destructive immune system attacks: a hyperactive RANK protein on the surface of B cells. The research opens the door to new therapeutic possibilities. (2021-02-02)

Moffitt researchers identify why CAR T therapy may fail in some lymphoma patients
In a new study published in Blood, the official journal of the American Society of Hematology, Moffitt researchers show that immune dysregulation can directly affect the efficacy of CAR T therapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. (2021-02-02)

Cancer research expands body's own immune system to kill tumors
Scientists are hoping advances in cancer research could lead to a day when a patient's own immune system could be used to fight and destroy a wide range of tumors. Cancer immunotherapy has some remarkable successes, but its effectiveness has been limited to a relatively small handful of cancers. In APL Bioengineering, researchers describe how advances in engineering models of tumors can greatly expand cancer immunotherapy's effectiveness to a wider range of cancers. (2021-02-02)

Yale researchers develop injection to treat skin cancer
Yale researchers are developing a skin cancer treatment that involves injecting nanoparticles into the tumor, killing cancer cells with a two-pronged approach, as a potential alternative to surgery. (2021-02-02)

Novel 3D printed stents deliver breakthrough treatment for oesophageal cancer
World-first 3D printed oesophageal stents developed by the University of South Australia could revolutionise the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to provide more accurate, effective and personalised treatment for patients with oesophageal cancer. (2021-02-02)

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