Current Cancer Diagnosis News and Events | Page 25

Current Cancer Diagnosis News and Events, Cancer Diagnosis News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Individualized model could help guide treatment of non-metastatic prostate cancer
A new risk model, easily accessible on a web interface, can predict the survival of non-metastatic prostate cancer patients, as well as the effect of different treatment approaches on survival. The modeling approach, developed by David Thurtle of the University of Cambridge, UK, and colleagues, is described this week in PLOS Medicine. (2019-03-12)

Web tool aims to better inform and refine need for treatment in early prostate cancer
A new tool to predict an individual's prognosis following a prostate cancer diagnosis could help prevent unnecessary treatment and related side effects, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2019-03-12)

Infertility is linked to small increased risk of cancer
A study of over 64,000 women of childbearing age in the USA has found that infertility is associated with a higher risk of developing cancer compared to a group of over three million women without fertility problems, although the absolute risk is very low at just 2 percent. The research is published in Human Reproduction journal. (2019-03-12)

New 'tracers' improve diagnosis of cancer and may be useful for treatment
Researchers have identified two new nuclear medicine tracers that make it easier to diagnose and potentially treat multiple types of cancer, providing high-quality images with less patient preparation and shorter acquisition times. The research is featured in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (http://jnm.snmjournals.org). (2019-03-11)

New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors
MIT researchers have developed a near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging system that could enable them to find tiny tumors, as small as a couple of hundred cells, deep within the body. (2019-03-07)

Do rural populations experience greater worry and fatalism about cancer?
Researchers will answer that question today at the Society of Behavioral Medicine's 40th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions. People living in rural areas are more likely to have ambiguous beliefs and fears about getting cancer, as well as more fatalistic viewpoints than urban dwellers, reports a research team from Mayo Clinic. (2019-03-07)

Cancer death rate higher for patients with mental health history
Cancer patients who have been hospitalised for mental health problems prior to their cancer diagnosis were 73 percent more likely to die from their cancer compared to those who had never had psychiatric help, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer. (2019-03-06)

Breast cancer patients weigh in on addressing financial burdens
A qualitative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health yielded nine patient-driven recommendations across circumstances that include changes to insurance, supportive services and financial assistance to reduce long-term, breast cancer-related economic burden. (2019-03-06)

Genomics could better match treatments to pancreatic cancer patients
Pancreatic cancer is a grim diagnosis, but this new study, the largest of its kind, identifies genomic markers that could increase survival by better matching chemotherapy drugs to patients. (2019-03-04)

Breast cancer cells rely on pyruvate to expand in new tissues
Most patients who die of breast cancer die of metastasis, the process by which cancer cells spread to other organs of the body. Cancer cells alter their metabolism to grow and expand across other organs. A new study by Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt from the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology and her PhD student Ilaria Elia has shown that breast cancer cells require the nutrient pyruvate to do this. (2019-03-04)

Pancreatic cancer collective comments on promising new pancreatic cancer
Lustgarten Foundation and SU2C offer comments on research describing a new combination drug therapy demonstrating promise for patients with pancreatic cancer. This research is the foundation for a Pancreatic Cancer Collective New Therapies Challenge Grant to Dr. Martin McMahon (Huntsman Cancer Institute). The Collective offers this video of Dr. McMahon and David Tuveson, MD, PhD commenting. (2019-03-04)

How common are mental health disorders after diagnosis of head and neck cancer?
Treatment for head and neck cancer (HNC) might cure the disease but it also can result in adverse effects such as disfigurement and speech difficulties, which can affect quality of life for patients. Using information from a large insurance claims database, this study examined how common mental health disorders were in patients with HNC and how they were associated with diagnosis and treatment. (2019-02-28)

Inflammation signals induce dormancy in aging brain stem cells
In old age, the amount of stem cells in the brains of mice decreases drastically. The remaining ones protect themselves from completely vanishing by entering a state of dormancy, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now reported in Cell. The old stem cells are hard to awaken, but once reactivated, they are just as potent as young ones. (2019-02-28)

Protein content as a marker for response to therapy in brain cancer
Brain tumors vary widely in how they respond to treatment. However, early assessment of therapy response is essential in order to choose the best possible treatment for the patient. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now been able to show in a study using non-invasive high-resolution 7-Tesla MRI scans that the protein content of tumors correlates with response to treatment and survival. (2019-02-28)

Research suggests that medications for kidney transplants increase risk of skin cancer
A study led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) has analysed the pattern of skin cancer rates in kidney transplant patients, which suggests the increased risk is related to the anti-rejection medications. (2019-02-27)

Colon cancer growth reduced by exercise
Exercise may play a role in reducing the growth of colon cancer cells according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. The study found that after a short session of high intensity interval training (HIIT), growth of colon cancer cells was reduced, and this also increased indicators of inflammation. (2019-02-27)

Cancer survivors see mostly positives in how they have changed
Two years after diagnosis, breast cancer survivors have four times more positive than negative thoughts about changes they experienced because of their illness, a new study found. (2019-02-26)

Better together: Mitochondrial fusion supports cell division
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that when cells divide rapidly, their mitochondria are fused together. In this configuration, the cell is able to more efficiently use oxygen for energy. This work illuminates the inner workings of dividing cells and shows how mitochondria combine to help cells to multiply in unexpected ways. (2019-02-26)

The Lancet Oncology: Worldwide estimates suggest that nearly 1 in 2 children with cancer are left undiagnosed and untreated
A modelling study published in The Lancet Oncology journal estimates that there are almost 400,000 new cases of childhood cancer annually, while current records count only around 200,000. (2019-02-26)

Super-enhancers: novel target for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma
Among many pathways of cancer progression that PDAC relies on, anomalous activation of the sonic hedgehog pathway has shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. (2019-02-26)

Researchers ID gene that may predict pancreatic cancer in people with Type 2 diabetes
Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a gene called ''UCP-1'' that may predict the development of pancreatic cancer in people with Type 2 diabetes. Their findings are published in Gastroenterology. (2019-02-25)

New microfluidics device can detect cancer cells in blood
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Queensland University of Technology of Australia, have developed a device that can isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples. (2019-02-25)

For young adult cancer survivors, debt and work-related impairments
One of the largest-ever studies of work-related risks in young adult cancer survivors finds that of 872 survivors, 14.4 percent borrowed more than $10,000 and 1.5 percent said they or their family had filed for bankruptcy as a direct result of illness or treatment. (2019-02-25)

Sperm quality unaffected by one course of chemotherapy for early testicular cancer
Men with early stage testicular cancer can safely receive one course of chemotherapy or radiotherapy after surgery without it having a long-term effect on their sperm count, according to a study published in Annals of Oncology. Until now, this has not been clear, although it is known already that several rounds of chemotherapy or high doses of radiotherapy given to men with more advanced testicular cancer can reduce sperm count and concentration. (2019-02-24)

Study: ACA Medicaid expansion shows impact on colon cancer screenings, survival in Kentucky
A new University of Kentucky study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows a direct link between the adoption of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion and the impact of colon cancer on Kentuckians. (2019-02-22)

Consuming garlic and onions may lower colorectal cancer risk
Consumption of allium vegetables -- which include garlic, leeks, and onions -- was linked with a reduced risk of in colorectal cancer in a study of men and women in China. (2019-02-21)

Report says health systems are key to improving cancer outcomes in the United States
A new report says without a national investment and commitment to transforming health care delivery in the United States, many people will not benefit from the substantial progress made against cancer. (2019-02-20)

New AI able to identify and predict the development of cancer symptom clusters
Cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy could soon benefit from a new AI that is able to identify and predict the development of different combinations of symptoms -- helping to alleviate much of the distress caused by their occurrence and severity. (2019-02-20)

New method to detect cancer cells faster, potentially improving outcomes
A new Purdue University technique to analyze proteins expressed on cancer cells shows promise in more rapidly detecting these cell types in patients. (2019-02-20)

T-cell receptor diversity may be key to treatment of follicular lymphoma, Mayo study finds
Healthy white blood cells, called ''T-cells,'' play a crucial role in how the body fights follicular lymphoma. That's according to the results of a study led by Mayo Clinic hematologists Zhi Zhang Yang, M.D., and Stephen Ansell, M.D., Ph.D., that was published in Cell Reports. T-cells are a key part of the immune system and protect the body by fighting infections and cancer. (2019-02-19)

More needs to be done to raise awareness of lung cancer risk in people with COPD
People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) need more support when understanding and acting on new chest symptoms, a study in the journal Psycho-Oncology reports. (2019-02-18)

Smoking may limit body's ability to fight dangerous form of skin cancer
Melanoma patients with a history of smoking cigarettes are 40 percent less likely to survive their skin cancer than people who have never smoked, according to a new report funded by Cancer Research UK. (2019-02-17)

Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients
Researchers have created new machine learning software that can forecast the survival rates and response to treatments of patients with ovarian cancer. (2019-02-15)

Novel app uses AI to guide, support cancer patients
Artificial intelligence is helping to guide and support some 50 breast cancer patients in rural Georgia through a novel mobile application that gives them personalized recommendations on everything from side effects to insurance. (2019-02-15)

DDT exposure tied to breast cancer risk for all women through age 54
All women exposed to high levels of DDT are at increased risk for breast cancer through age 54, but the timing of cancer risk depends on when they were first exposed. Women exposed before 14 years of age, particularly in infancy and early childhood, were most likely to develop premenopausal breast cancer, while those who were exposed after infancy were at increased risk of developing cancer later, at 50-54 years of age. (2019-02-13)

Recurring infections could lead to delayed bladder or kidney cancer diagnosis
Women with bladder or kidney cancer may lose out on a prompt diagnosis if they are already being regularly treated for recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs), according to new research presented at Cancer Research UK's Early Diagnosis Conference in Birmingham today (Wednesday). (2019-02-13)

Link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer ignored by women most at risk
Middle aged women in Australia aren't getting the message about the proven link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer, at a time when more are drinking while cancer rates in their age bracket are increasing, according to a new study. (2019-02-13)

Only 'modest' improvement in heart failure survival rates since 2000
Survival after a diagnosis of heart failure in the United Kingdom has shown only modest improvement in the 21st century and lags behind other serious conditions, such as cancer, finds a large study published by The BMJ today. (2019-02-13)

New research suggests a simple blood test could improve the early detection of lung cancer
New research led by scientists at the MRC Toxicology Unit suggests that by analysing levels of DNA in the blood, the early detection of lung cancer could be improved. The study, published in the journal Disease Models and Mechanisms, found that in preliminary tests using mice, a blood test could measure the circulating levels of DNA in the blood which cancer cells shed as they grow and multiply, and could even predict the presence of tumours in the lungs before they became cancerous. (2019-02-12)

Large study fails to link phthalates and increased breast cancer risk
In the largest study to date on phthalates and postmenopausal breast cancer, a University of Massachusetts Amherst cancer epidemiology researcher found no association between breast cancer risk and exposure to the plasticizing and solvent chemicals used in such common products as shampoo, makeup, vinyl flooring, toys, medical devices and car interiors. (2019-02-12)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.