Current Capsaicin News and Events

Current Capsaicin News and Events, Capsaicin News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 4 | 148 Results
The compound that makes chili peppers spicy also boosts perovskite solar cell performance
Research publishing January 13 in the journal Joule, determined that sprinkling capsaicin, the compound that makes peppers spicy, into the precursor of methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3) perovskite during the manufacturing process led to a greater abundance of electrons (instead of empty placeholders) to conduct current at the semiconductor's surface. The addition resulted in polycrystalline MAPbI3 solar cells with the most efficient charge transport to date. (2021-01-13)

Chili-shaped device could reveal just how hot that pepper is
Some people love spicy food -- the hotter, the better. Others go out of their way to avoid the palate-singeing burn of capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick. Now, researchers have developed a portable device (whimsically shaped like a chili pepper) that can reveal how much capsaicin a pepper contains, before biting into it. They report their results in ACS Applied Nano Materials. (2020-10-21)

The good cough and the bad cough
Researchers might be able to treat a troublesome cough in disease without disrupting the protective cough we need for optimal lung health, by targeting the different brain circuits involved. That's according to new research published today in The Journal of Physiology. (2020-10-07)

New study takes aim at advanced types of non-addictive pain therapies
A team of scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences and the Biodesign Institute have recently published a study in Nature Communications that helps clarify the contributions to an ion channel's temperature - dependent activation. This in turn should aid in the development of new types of non-addictive pain therapies. (2020-08-26)

Brain waves can be used to predict future pain sensitivity
Rhythms produced by the brain can reliably be used to predict how sensitive we are to pain, new research shows. (2020-08-06)

One minute simultaneous analysis of pungency components in kimchi
The World Institute of Kimchi (WiKim) announced its development of a rapid analysis method for quantifying capsaicin (CAP) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), which are major pungency components in kimchi, within 1 min. (2020-06-15)

Consumption of chili pepper cuts down the risk of death from a heart or cerebral attack
Chili pepper is a common guest in Italians kitchens, and over the centuries it has been praised for its supposed therapeutic virtues. Now an Italian research shows that people who consume it on a regular basis have a mortality risk for every cause reduced by 23% compared to those who do not like it. (2019-12-16)

Immersion in virtual reality scenes of the Arctic helps to ease people's pain
Watching immersive 360 videos of icy Arctic scenes helps to relieve intense burning pain and could hold hope for treating chronic pain, a small study has found. (2019-11-08)

Warning to those wanting to spice up their lives
Think twice before adding that extra kick of chili sauce or chopped jalapeno to your meal. New research involving the University of South Australia shows a spicy diet could be linked to dementia. (2019-07-22)

Milk: Best drink to reduce burn from chili peppers
People who order their Buffalo wings especially spicy and sometimes find them to be too 'hot,' should choose milk to reduce the burn, according to Penn State researchers, who also suggest it does not matter if it is whole or skim. (2019-06-25)

Pain free, thanks to evolution
African mole-rats are insensitive to many different kinds of pain. As an international research team led by the MDC's Gary Lewin reports in Science, this characteristic has even allowed mole-rats to populate new habitats. Thanks to a genetic change, the highveld mole-rat is able to live alongside venomous ants with painful stings that other mole-rats avoid. (2019-05-30)

African mole-rats immune to 'wasabi pain'
A new report in Science provides the first evidence of a mammal -- the highveld mole-rat -- being immune to pain from exposure to allyl isothiocyanate, or AITC, the active ingredient of wasabi. (2019-05-30)

A highly sensitive detection for spicy tastes to choose kimchi of your preference!
The World Institute of Kimchi has announced that it has developed a new analytical tool for the ultra-trace ratiometric detection of capsaicinoids, an analysis method that can be easily applied to analyze the spicy tastes of kimchi in industrial fields. As a result, the team successfully devised a simple yet reliable ultrasensitive analytical technique that takes less than 30 mins, while its detection strength was improved by up to one million times. (2019-05-08)

Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters
It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. Saunders. (2019-04-15)

Spicy compound from chili peppers slows lung cancer progression
Findings from a new study show that the compound responsible for chili peppers' heat could help slow the spread of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women. Most cancer-related deaths occur when cancer spreads to distant sites, a process called metastasis. (2019-04-06)

Experimental Biology highlights -- Cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and medical news
Embargoed press materials are now available for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting, to be held in Orlando April 6-9. EB is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together more than 12,000 scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community. (2019-04-03)

Study identifies gene that makes gentle touch feel painful after injury
In a study of four patients with a rare genetic disorder, NIH researchers found that the PIEZO2 gene may be responsible for tactile allodynia: the skin's reaction to injury that makes normally gentle touches feel painful. This and a second NIH-funded study showed how the gene may play an essential role in the nervous system's reaction to injury and inflammation, making PIEZO2 a target for developing precise treatments for relieving the pain caused by cuts, burns, and other skin injuries. (2018-10-10)

PIEZO2, a molecular target for treating clinical pain
The researchers think topical application of PIEZO2 blockers could be beneficial for patients suffering from neuropathic pain. (2018-10-10)

Anti-obesity drug derived from chili peppers shows promise in animal trials
A novel drug based on capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their spicy burn, caused long term weight loss and improved metabolic health in mice eating a high fat diet, in new studies from the University of Wyoming School of Pharmacy. The drug, Metabocin, was designed to slowly release capsaicin throughout the day so it can exert its anti-obesity effect without producing inflammation or adverse side effects. (2018-07-17)

Tree shrew tolerance for spicy foods unlocked by researchers
Researchers accidentally observed tree shrews directly and actively consuming chili peppers, despite the deep geographic isolation between the animal and the food. To understand this tolerance for spicy food, they performed genomic and functional analyses on the tree shrew and its TRPV1. (2018-07-13)

Tree shrews can tolerate hot peppers: Mutation in pain receptor makes peppery plant palatable
Almost all mammals avoid eating chili peppers and other 'hot' foods, because of the pain they induce. But not the tree shrew, according to a study publishing July 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yalan Han of the Kunming Institute of Zoology in China, and colleagues. The researchers found that this close relative of primates is unaffected by the active ingredient in chili peppers due to a subtle mutation in the receptor that detects it. (2018-07-12)

When hypothalamic cells warm up, feeding goes down: Exercise-induced appetite suppression
Exercise heats up the hypothalamus to drive down food intake, according to a study publishing on April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Jae Hoon Jeong, Young-Hwan Jo, and colleagues at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. The findings answer a long-standing question about the cause of exercise-induced reduction in appetite. (2018-04-24)

Research explains link between exercise and appetite loss
Ever wonder why intense exercise temporarily curbs your appetite? In research described in today's issue of PLOS Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers reveal that the answer is all in your head -- more specifically, your arcuate nucleus. (2018-04-24)

Leuven researchers uncover ion channel trio that mediates painful heat sensing
Researchers at VIB and KU Leuven have uncovered a trio of complementary ion channels in sensory neurons that mediate detection of acute, harmful heat. Having three redundant molecular heat-sensing mechanisms provides a powerful fail-safe mechanism that protects against burn injuries. The seminal findings have been published today in Nature. (2018-03-14)

Researchers show how insect food choice can be manipulated
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found a way to access and manipulate taste neurons in the pharynx (throat) of the common fruit fly that could help control the spread of mosquito-related illnesses, such as dengue, malaria, yellow fever, and Zika virus, and reduce the loss of crops due to agricultural pests. (2017-12-05)

Scientists uncover dietary strategy to address obesity using component in red chili
Scientists have discovered a dietary strategy that may address obesity by reducing endotoxemia, a major contributor to chronic, low-grade inflammation (CLGI). The researchers uncovered an interaction between dietary capsaicin (CAP), the major pungent component in red chili, and gut microbiota. This novel mechanism for the anti-obesity effect of CAP acts through prevention of microbial dysbiosis. (2017-05-23)

Chili peppers and marijuana calm the gut
You wouldn't think chili peppers and marijuana have much in common. But when eaten, both interact with the same receptor in our stomachs, according to a paper by UConn researchers published in the April 24 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research could lead to new therapies for diabetes and colitis, and opens up intriguing questions about the relationship between the immune system, the gut and the brain. (2017-04-24)

New method for tapping vast plant pharmacopeia to make more effective drugs
Vanderbilt geneticists have developed an effective method for identifying the plant genes that produce the chemical ammunition plants use to protect themselves from predation and is a natural source of many important drugs. (2017-04-14)

Which drugs effectively treat diabetic nerve pain?
A federal health agency has found certain antidepressants and anti-seizure drugs are among medications that effectively treat diabetic nerve pain. The research is being published simultaneously in the March 24, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and in a more comprehensive report by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). (2017-03-24)

How to stop pain from serious burns using epigenetics
The unpleasant sensation sparked by the nervous system when confronted with a harmful stimulus can be alleviated by blocking a genetic marker that switches off the activity of the neurons involved. Jose Vicente Torres Pérez, a Spanish researcher who works at Imperial College in London, has trialled this innovative pain relief therapy on mice with serious burns. The aim is to use his findings to help burn victims. (2017-02-01)

Study finds association between eating hot peppers and decreased mortality
A large prospective study has found that consumption of hot red chili peppers is associated with a 13 percent reduction in total mortality. (2017-01-13)

Spicy molecule inhibits growth of breast cancer cells
Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Hanns Hatt and Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumor cells. The experiments were carried out with the SUM149PT cell culture, a model system for a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer, i.e. the triple-negative type. Chemotherapy is currently the only available treatment for this type of cancer. (2016-12-20)

David Julius to receive the 2017 HFSP Nakasone Award
The Human Frontier Science Program Organization has announced that the 2017 HFSP Nakasone Award has been awarded to David Julius of the University of California, San Francisco for his 'discovery of the molecular mechanism of thermal sensing in animals.' (2016-11-08)

Ginger and chili peppers could work together to lower cancer risk
For many people, there's nothing more satisfying than a hot, spicy meal. But some research has suggested that capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick, might cause cancer. Now researchers show in mouse studies that the pungent compound in ginger, 6-ginergol, could counteract capsaicin's potentially harmful effects. In combination with the capsaicin, 6-gingerol could lower the risk of cancer, they say. The study appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2016-09-07)

New research may help to develop effective pain killers
If you have ever chopped chilies and then accidentally touched your eyes you will be familiar with the burning sensation that this causes. However, the substance responsible for this sensation can also have beneficial effects. Unfortunately, it often causes side effects such as a strong burning sensation. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now identified another substance that could be just as effective at combating severe pain but is much more easily tolerated. (2016-06-30)

An effective but painful treatment
Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for early-stage skin cancer. However, this therapy can cause patients severe pain. The reason for this was previous a mystery to researchers. Physiologists at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now discovered that it is due to two specific ion channels. (2016-06-23)

Functional MRI may help identify new, effective painkillers for chronic pain sufferers
New research may allow new, more effective and safer pain medications to reach patients who suffer from chronic pain sooner. (2016-02-04)

Why it hurts to eat hot peppers (video)
You have probably had the burning pleasure of eating a jalapeno or other tear-inducing pepper. What causes this painful fire in your mouth? The short answer is capsaicin. But what exactly is capsaicin? How does it work? Why do people drink milk to relieve the pain? Reactions has the chemistry to answer all these sizzling questions and more. (2015-12-01)

How the 'heat' compound from chili peppers could help kill cancer cells
Capsaicin, the compound responsible for chilis' heat, is used in creams sold to relieve pain, and recent research shows that in high doses, it kills prostate cancer cells. Now researchers are finding clues that help explain how the substance works. Their conclusions suggest that one day it could come in a new, therapeutic form. Their study appears in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. (2015-09-09)

Study finds e-cigarette use linked to cough reflex sensitivity
The popularity of electronic cigarettes has steadily increased worldwide, but little is known about their effects on health. New research suggests that the single use of an electronic cigarette approximating the nicotine exposure of one tobacco cigarette reduces the sensitivity of the cough reflex. (2015-08-20)

Page 1 of 4 | 148 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.