Current Capsule Endoscopy News and Events

Current Capsule Endoscopy News and Events, Capsule Endoscopy News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
RUDN University chemist used iodine to synthesize new chalcogenides
A chemist from RUDN University, working with a group of colleagues, synthesized three new chalcogenides (compounds that contain metals and elements from group 16 of the periodic table). The team suggested an unusual approach to synthesis that was based on iodine. (2021-02-19)

A new piece of the HIV infection puzzle explored
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Heidelberg University Hospital combine high-resolution imaging to observe the infection process in cell nuclei, opening the door for new therapeutics. (2021-02-18)

New potential therapy for Crohn's disease in children
Scientists from the Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago demonstrated that a nanotherapy reduces intestinal inflammation and shrinks lesions in a rodent model of severe Crohn's disease. (2021-02-17)

Biodegradable microcapsules deliver nerve growth factor to guide neuronal development
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues have demonstrated that nanoengineered biodegradable microcapsules can guide the development of hippocampal neurons in an in vitro experiment. The microcapsules deliver nerve growth factor, a peptide necessary for neuron growth. (2021-02-16)

Intranasal influenza vaccine spurs strong immune response in Phase 1 study
An experimental single-dose, intranasal influenza vaccine was safe and produced a durable immune response when tested in a Phase 1 study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The investigational vaccine, called Ad4-H5-VTN, is a recombinant, replicating adenovirus vaccine designed to spur antibodies to hemagglutinin, a protein found on the surface of influenza viruses that attaches to human cells. (2021-02-03)

Deep Vision: Near-infrared imaging and machine learning can identify hidden tumors
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are tumors of the digestive tract that grow underneath the mucus layer covering our organs. Because they are deep inside the tissue, these ''submucosal tumors'' are difficult to detect and diagnose, even with a biopsy. Now, researchers from Japan have developed a novel minimally invasive and accurate method using infrared imaging and machine learning to distinguish between normal tissue and tumor areas. This technique has a strong potential for widespread clinical use. (2021-02-02)

Diamonds need voltage
Diamonds are fascinating - as jewellery but also because of the extreme hardness of the material. How exactly this variant of carbon is formed deep underground and under extremely high pressures and temperatures remains a mystery. Now, researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences Novosibirsk, collaborating with the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ, have documented a new influencing factor in theory and experiment. Weak electric fields can be a decisive catalyst for its formation (2021-01-21)

Eggs reveal what may happen to brain on impact
Our brains consist of soft matter bathed in watery cerebrospinal fluid inside a hard skull, and in Physics of Fluids, researchers describe studying another system with the same features, an egg, to search for answers about concussions. Considering that in most concussive brain injuries, the skull does not break, they wanted to find out if it was possible to break or deform the egg yolk without breaking the eggshell. (2021-01-19)

A master cancer gene hijacks a 'molecular crowbar' to make breast cancer cells invasive
Researchers investigated how cancer genes lead to the breakdown of the capsule that prevents cancerous cells from invading the surrounding healthy tissues and - find a hijacked ''molecular crowbar''. The new findings help understand the mechanisms of cancer spreading and reveal a cancer vulnerability. (2021-01-18)

Monash University leads breakthrough against antibiotic-resistance
New research published today has discovered how to revert antibiotic-resistance in one of the most dangerous superbugs. (2021-01-12)

Viewing upper gastrointestinal cancers in a new light
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report the use of Linked Color Imaging, an innovative modality that specifically combines selected wavelengths of light for illumination in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. This method, by enhancing the subtle variations in red and white hues that indicate mucosal transformation, greatly improves the early detection of upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasms as compared with conventional white light illumination. (2021-01-05)

The Subaru Telescope photographs the next target asteroid for Hayabusa2
On December 10, 2020 (Hawai?i Standard Time), the Subaru Telescope imaged the small asteroid 1998 KY26, the target of Hayabusa2's extended mission. The positional data for 1998 KY26 collected during the observations will be used to more accurately determine the orbital elements of this object. (2020-12-17)

First presentation after Hayabusa2 mission return set for SPIE conference 14 December
As part of the opening plenary session at the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation Digital Forum, Hitoshi Kuninaka, of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, will be discussing and responding to audience questions about the successful return of the Hayabusa2 capsule from its asteroid-sample mission, a second-time-in-history-success that marks exciting and innovating advances for the astronomical-instrumentation community. In addition, Kuninaka may have initial information regarding what potential treasures the capsule's sample container holds. (2020-12-10)

New treatment in development for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation
Researchers devised a plan to treat IBS with constipation by delivering chenodeoxycholic acid in a bilayered capsule, finding that this mode of delivery could decrease colon cramping and thus produce a better patient experience. (2020-12-08)

Research leads to better modeling of hypersonic flow
Designing a thermal protection system to keep astronauts and cargo safe requires an understanding at the molecular level of the complicated physics going on in the gas that flows around the vehicle. Recent research at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign added new knowledge about the physical phenomena that occur as atoms vibrate, rotate, and collide in this extreme environment. (2020-12-03)

Magnetic spray: Giving inanimate objects new bionergy
Recently, researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with the City University of Hong Kong (CityU), have developed an agglutinate, reprogrammable, disintegrable and biocompatible magnetic spray (M-spray) that can easily turn inanimate objects into millirobots. (2020-11-18)

Experts release new management strategies for malignant colorectal polyps
Early identification and removal of cancerous colorectal polyps is critical to preventing the progression of colorectal cancer and improving survival rates. The U.S. Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer has released new guidance for endoscopists on how to assess colorectal lesions for features associated with cancer, discuss how these factors guide management, and outline when to advise surgery after malignant polyp removal. (2020-11-04)

Identifying potential anti-COVID-19 pharmacological components of TCM
Identifying potential anti-COVID-19 pharmacological components of traditional Chinese medicine Lianhuaqingwen capsule based on human exposure and ACE2 biochromatography screening https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsb.2020.10.002 Lianhuaqingwen (LHQW) capsule, a herb medicine product, has been clinically proved to be effective in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia treatment. (2020-10-27)

UArizona Health Sciences researchers find biomarker that can appear before stomach cancer
A microRNA that can be found in a blood sample may make it easier to detect gastric cancer and could lead to improved treatment for the disease and others like it that are resistant to common immunotherapies. (2020-10-20)

Using robotic assistance to make colonoscopy kinder and easier
Scientists have made a breakthrough in their work to develop semi-autonomous colonoscopy, using a robot to guide a medical device into the body. The milestone brings closer the prospect of an intelligent robotic system being able to guide instruments to precise locations in the body to take biopsies or allow internal tissues to be examined. (2020-10-12)

New research on cataract surgery in order to improve health care
In general, surgeons who perform numerous cataract operations every year encounter relatively few severe cases, and this probably contributes to their lower complication rate, as shown by a study led from the University of Gothenburg. These results provide new knowledge in the endeavor to further improve healthcare for a large group of patients. (2020-10-02)

Researchers combine photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging in tiny package
Researchers have demonstrated a new endoscope that uniquely combines photoacoustic and fluorescent imaging in a device about the thickness of a human hair. The device could one day provide new insights into the brain by enabling blood dynamics to be measured at the same time as neuronal activity. (2020-09-21)

Sampling the gut microbiome with an ingestible pill
Gut microbes affect human health, but there is still much to learn, in part because they're not easy to collect. But researchers now report in ACS Nano that they have developed an ingestible capsule that in rat studies captured bacteria and other biological samples while passing through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. (2020-09-09)

ENT physicians and researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Virtual Annual Meeting
During the AAO-HNSF 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting & OTO Experience, which runs from September 13 through October 25, the most current research in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be introduced during the Scientific Oral Presentations. Scientific Oral Presentations are a series of three- to six-minute presentations focusing on current evidence-based research, surgical procedures, and approaches in clinical sciences and their application to patient care. (2020-09-09)

Tiny biological package gets drug right to the 'heart' of transplant rejection
For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, 'Good things come in small packages,' may become words to live by. In a recent study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection drug directly to the area surrounding a grafted heart by packaging it within a tiny three-dimensional, protein gel cocoon known as a hydrogel. (2020-09-03)

AGA recommends bidirectional endoscopy for most patients with iron deficiency anemia
The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published new clinical guidelines outlining an evidence-based approach for the initial gastrointestinal evaluation of chronic iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic patients. Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common worldwide, and a gastrointestinal cause should be considered in all patients without an obvious cause for their anemia. (2020-09-01)

Cigarette-like 'cigarillos' flout efforts to curb smoking
Tax cigarillos in line with cigarettes to stop tobacco companies from exploiting loopholes in system, say researchers. (2020-08-27)

Bio-based communication networks could control cells in the body to treat conditions
Electronic devices and biological cells communicate through very different mechanisms. Now, scientists report progress on tiny communication networks that overcome this language barrier, allowing electronics to eavesdrop on cells and alter their behavior -- and vice versa. Potential applications include a capsule that could be swallowed to track blood sugar and make insulin when needed. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

PLOS special collection launch
On August 12 2020, a Special Collection of articles addressing how to improve access to safe, quality medicines in East Africa by simplifying the regulatory processes in the region was published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. The five articles in the collection all look at how the East African Community (EAC)'s Medicines Regulatory Harmonization (MRH) initiative has aimed to solve this challenge over the past 8 years and what the future of the initiative is. (2020-08-12)

Swallowing this colonoscopy-like bacteria grabber could reveal secrets about your health
Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs. But scientists can see only so much of the gastrointestinal tract to study the role of gut bacteria in your health. Purdue University researchers built a way to swallow a tool that acts like a colonoscopy, except that instead of looking at the colon with a camera, the technology takes samples of bacteria. (2020-08-12)

New study sheds light on evolution of hell ants from 100 million years ago
An international research team co-led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology (NIGPAS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has confirmed the special trap-jaw predation mechanism of hell ants, providing new insights into their evolution. (2020-08-06)

Risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission during flexible laryngoscopy
Researchers review evidence on the risks of aerosolization and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from patients to health care workers during endoscopy of the upper aerodigestive tract. (2020-07-30)

Cinnamon may improve blood sugar control in people with prediabetes
Cinnamon improves blood sugar control in people with prediabetes and could slow the progression to type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-07-21)

New guideline: Don't routinely screen for EAC in patients with chronic GERD
A new guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, based on a rigorous systematic review of the latest evidence, found no benefit of routine screening for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and precursor conditions (Barrett esophagus and dysplasia) in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The guideline, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), recommends physicians in Canada continue current practice to not screen routinely http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190814. (2020-07-06)

The electrified brain
A group of researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have further refined the use of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. By accurately localizing electrode placement in the brains of patients, the researchers were able to identify a fiber tract which is associated with the best clinical outcomes following deep brain stimulation. The researchers' findings, have been published in Nature Communications*. (2020-07-06)

Determining effective magnetic moment of multicore nanoparticles
Most commercial nanoparticles do not possess a single magnetic core but have small magnetic crystals called crystallites. The important question is how these crystallites behave inside a multicore nanoparticle and how they respond to an applied magnetic field. In the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers compare the effective magnetic moments of different multicore nanoparticle systems and shows that they are magnetic-field dependent. The paper's findings are important for researchers optimizing magnetic nanoparticles for various applications. (2020-06-16)

Developing better fabrication techniques for pH-responsive microcapsules
Researchers have developed a new method to create microcapsules, which are tiny droplets surrounded by a solid shell. The technique can be used to make microcapsules that respond to changes in pH, which are useful for applications such as anti-corrosion coatings. (2020-06-09)

How magnetic fields and 3D printers will create the pills of tomorrow
Doctors could soon be administering an entire course of treatment for life-threatening conditions with a 3D printed capsule controlled by magnetic fields thanks to advances made by University of Sussex researchers. (2020-06-09)

Russian scientists improved the way of treatment of phenylketonuria
A person affected by this disease has to follow a low-protein diet all his life. Otherwise, phenylalanine will accumulate in the body and can lead to severe damage to the central nervous system. (2020-05-21)

How to improve the pneumococcus vaccine
Pneumococcus kills 1 million children annually according to the World Health Organization. The key to the pathogen's virulence is its thick sugar capsule, which is also the active ingredient in vaccines. Different strains have different capsules. Researchers just identified a new capsule for the pneumococcus -- the 100th to be found after more than a century of research on the pathogen. (2020-05-19)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.