Current Carbohydrates News and Events

Current Carbohydrates News and Events, Carbohydrates News Articles.
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Artificial pancreas system upgraded with AI algorithm
POSTECH professor Sung-Min Park's research team is developing a fully automated glucose management system that goes beyond the limits. (2021-02-22)

Low-quality maternal diet during pregnancy may be associated with late-childhood obesity
Eating a low quality diet, high in foods and food components associated with chronic inflammation, during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of obesity and excess body fat in children, especially during late-childhood. The findings are published the open access journal BMC Medicine. (2021-02-21)

Eating more refined grains increases risk of heart attack & death: SFU researcher
A new study published in The British Medical Journal by researchers including SFU health sciences professor Scott Lear found consuming a high number of refined grains, such as croissants and white bread, is associated with a higher risk of major cardiovascular disease, stroke and death. (2021-02-19)

New study: nine out of ten US infants experience gut microbiome deficiency
A new peer-reviewed study reveals that the vast majority of US infants may be suffering from a substantial deficiency in an important bacterium key to breast milk utilization and immune system development, as well as protection against gut pathogens linked to common newborn conditions such as colic and diaper rash. The study is the largest to date to benchmark the widespread deficiency in gut bacteria among US infants, and the resulting diminished function of their gut microbiomes. (2021-01-21)

Making protein 'superfood' from marine algae
Marine microalgae-based cellular agriculture is a promising new way to sustainably produce plant-based 'meat' and healthy 'superfoods' for the future. Researchers at Flinders University's Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development (CMBD) in Australia are responding to growing interest from consumers looking for healthier, more environmentally friendly, sustainable and ethical alternatives to animal proteins. (2021-01-21)

Researchers study what happens to your body during tailgating
Football watch parties are synonymous with eating fatty foods and drinking alcohol. Have you ever wondered what all of that eating and drinking does to your body? Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine simulated a tailgating situation with a small group of overweight but healthy men and examined the impact of the eating and drinking on their livers using blood tests and a liver scan. (2021-01-20)

NIH study compares low-fat, plant-based diet to low-carb, animal-based diet
People on a low-fat, plant-based diet ate fewer daily calories but had higher insulin and blood glucose levels, compared to when they ate a low-carbohydrate, animal-based diet, according to a small but highly controlled study at the National Institutes of Health. Led by researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the study compared the effects of the two diets on calorie intake, hormone levels, body weight, and more. (2021-01-19)

Short term low carbohydrate diet linked to remission of type 2 diabetes
Patients with type 2 diabetes who follow a strict low carbohydrate diet for six months may experience greater rates of remission compared with other recommended diets without adverse effects, suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2021-01-13)

Flag leaves could help top off photosynthetic performance in rice
A team from the University of Illinois and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) found that some flag leaves of different varieties of rice transform light and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates better than others, potentially opening new opportunities for breeding higher yielding rice varieties. (2020-12-29)

Do meal kits tick right boxes?
During the pandemic, handy meal kit delivery services are helping to develop home cooking habits incorporating healthy ingredients such as vegetables, and a balance of less harmful fats and salt. However, it's important to understand the qualities of these recipes, which vary from week to week, before deciding whether the meal kit is a suitable service for you and your family's nutritional needs and preferences,'' Australian nutrition and dietetics researchers say in a paper in Health Promotion International. (2020-11-19)

National supplies of protein, carbs and fats can predict your lifespan
A new global study from the University of Sydney has looked at how macronutrient supplies (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) of different countries are associated with the risk of death at different ages. It is the most extensive analysis to date of corresponding national macronutrient supplies, survival statistics and economic data. (2020-11-16)

Cassava may benefit from atmospheric change more than other crops
A team from the University of Illinois and Monash University studied how the root crop cassava, which feeds over 1 billion people, will adapt to the amount of carbon dioxide expected by the second half of this century. (2020-11-11)

Plants communicate at a molecular level
Working together with researchers from the University of Tübingen, the University of Tromsø, the UC Davis and the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, biologists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have discovered how tomato plants identify Cuscuta as a parasite. The plant has a protein in its cell walls that is identified as 'foreign' by a receptor in the tomato. (2020-10-20)

The key to lowering CO2 emissions is made of metal
Researchers at Osaka City University produce malic acid, which contains 4 carbon atoms, through artificial photosynthesis by simply adding metal ions like aluminum and iron. This solves a problem with current artificial photosynthesis technology of only producing molecules with 1 carbon atom and paves the way to exploring the use of CO2 as a raw material. (2020-09-28)

Cincinnati Children's scientists identify hormone that might help treat malabsorption
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's used human intestinal organoids grown from stem cells to discover how our bodies control the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat. They further found that one hormone might be able to reverse a congenital disorder in babies who cannot adequately absorb nutrients and need intravenous feeding to survive. (2020-09-22)

How to get a handle on carbon dioxide uptake by plants
How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? It's a deceptively complicated question, so a Rutgers-led group of scientists recommends combining two cutting-edge tools to help answer the crucial climate change-related question. (2020-09-21)

New building block in plant wall construction
University of Adelaide researchers as part of a multidisciplinary, international team, have uncovered a new biochemical mechanism fundamental to plant life. The research, published in The Plant Journal details the discovery of the enzymatic reaction involving carbohydrates present in plant cell walls, which are essential for their structure. (2020-08-18)

SFU chemist's new process fast-tracks drug treatments for viral infections and cancer
Discovering antiviral and anticancer drugs will soon be faster and cheaper thanks to new research from Simon Fraser University chemist Robert Britton and his international team. (2020-08-07)

Researchers discover a new and unique class of carbohydrate receptors
An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role. (2020-07-30)

NIST expands database that helps identify unknown compounds in milk
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have recently doubled the size of a reference library that includes examples of a certain type of carbohydrate found in milk from humans and several other animals. The expansion of the library will help scientists identify the unknown compounds in their own milk samples. The researchers published their new findings in Analytical Chemistry. (2020-07-27)

Plant-based diets high in carbs improve type 1 diabetes, according to new case studies
Plant-based diets rich in whole carbohydrates can improve insulin sensitivity and other health markers in individuals with type 1 diabetes, according to two case studies published by researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in the Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism. (2020-07-23)

The colorful history of plastids
Emerging genome data provides new insight into plastid evolution. (2020-07-13)

Milking algae mechanically: Progress to succeed petroleum derived chemicals
A method to extract carbohydrates and phycobiliproteins from algae was developed that does not kill the algae during harvest or rely on solvents for extraction and purification. This novel method uses mechanical shearing to 'milk' the desired compounds, greatly reducing the production cost of algae-derived compounds. (2020-07-08)

Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. As jellyfish blooms become more frequent and more massive, this could affect marine ecosystems. (2020-06-24)

Landmark study shows inflammation after meals varies dramatically among healthy adults
Researchers led by King's College London announced today the first published results from PREDICT, the largest ongoing nutritional study of its kind. (2020-06-11)

Experts debate saturated fat consumption guidelines for Americans
Should public health guidelines recommend reducing saturated fat consumption as much as possible? Nutrition experts are tackling that controversial question head-on in a new series of papers outlining key points of agreement--and disagreement -- in how to interpret the evidence and inform health guidelines. (2020-06-03)

Eating whole grains could help lower diabetes risk
A new analysis of more than 200,000 people found that eating high-quality carbohydrates, such as whole grains, was associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. (2020-06-01)

Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from space
As inevitable fellow travellers on the bodies of astronauts, spaceships, or equipment, terrestrial microorganisms will undoubtedly come into contact with extraterrestrial environments. Researchers from the Radboudumc describe in an article in Astrobiology that bacteria can survive on an 'extraterrestrial diet', which affected their pathogenic potential. (2020-05-26)

Adding a blend of spices to a meal may help lower inflammation
Penn State researchers found that adding six grams of spices to a meal high in fat and carbohydrates resulted in lower inflammation markers hours later. (2020-05-21)

IKBFU scientists have discovered a way to increase wheat immunity
A very original way to increase what can be conditionally called wheat immunity was suggested by the staff of the Laboratory of Natural Antioxidants at the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University. The results of the research, which were financed by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research and the government of the Kaliningrad region, were recently published in the Plants scientific journal. (2020-05-03)

Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria
Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria to gain beneficial attributes, such as the ability to tolerate stressful environments or break down carbohydrates for food, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2020-04-29)

Scientists studied the growth rate effect of gut bacteria on degradation of dietary fibers
It is known that approximately 80% of human immune system functions in the gastrointestinal tract. Gut bacteria and their metabolites play a fundamental role in the interaction between gut and other organs. Since the organic acids produced by colon bacteria (acetate, lactate, propionate, succinate and butyrate) activate a number of immune and hormonal processes, the microbiota composed of hundreds of different bacterial species is of vital importance for the normal functioning and health of the human body. (2020-04-28)

Reference genes are identified that are useful for genetic improvement in wheat
University of Cordoba Professor Miguel Aguilar participated in a published article on reference genes in the study of wheat meiosis, the process in which reproductive cells are generated (2020-04-21)

On Mars or Earth, biohybrid can turn carbon dioxide into new products
UC Berkeley chemists have created a hybrid system of bacteria and nanowires that captures energy from sunlight and transfers it to the bacteria to turn carbon dioxide and water into organic molecules and oxygen. On Earth, such a biohybrid could remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. On Mars, it would provide colonists with raw material to manufacture organic compounds ranging from fuels to drugs. The efficiency is greater than the photosynthetic efficiency of most plants. (2020-03-31)

More than a nice coating
Researchers at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) have shown that specialized aggregates of molecules enwrapping nerve cells in the brain, the perineuronal nets, are crucial for regulating the connections between nerve cells that control motor memories. The discovery, published in the PNAS, provide novel insight into how memories are formed and stored in the brain. (2020-03-10)

New research finds infant cereal consumption is associated with improved nutrient intake
An investigation of infant feeding patterns found infants and toddlers consuming baby cereal, such as rice cereal, had higher intakes of key nutrients of concern, such as calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc and vitamin E. The study illustrates the importance of rice baby cereal in the diets of infants and toddlers in achieving proper nutrition. (2020-03-10)

Artificial sweeteners combined with carbs may be more harmful than those sweeteners alone
The influence of artificial sweeteners on the brain and ultimately metabolism has been hotly debated in recent years. Some studies have found adverse effects on blood sugar and insulin levels, while others have not. In a study publishing March 3 in the journal Cell Metabolism, researchers say the discrepancies in these studies may be due to how the sweeteners are consumed -- or, more specifically, what they are consumed with. (2020-03-03)

Crops provide chimpanzees with more energy than wild foods
A University of Kent study has found that cultivated foods offer chimpanzees in West Africa more energetic benefits than wild foods available in the region. The findings have made a significant development for our further understanding into human-primate coexistence and can help to inform conservation efforts for future improvement, particularly in locations where agricultural expansion is encroaching on tropical forests. (2020-02-17)

Clostridioides difficile infection flourishes with a high-protein, high-fat diet
Mice fed a high-fat, high-protein diet were more likely to develop and die from antibiotic-driven Clostridioides difficile infections than mice fed a standard diet. In the same study, published in the journal mSystems, a high-carbohydrate diet was protective against severe C. difficile infection--but the researchers suspect that such a diet could produce healthy, asymptomatic carriers that can spread the pathogen. (2020-02-11)

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy. (2020-02-04)

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