Current Carbon Cycle News and Events | Page 25

Current Carbon Cycle News and Events, Carbon Cycle News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
'Charismatic carbon'
According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), addressing carbon emissions from our food sector is absolutely essential to combatting climate change. While land and agriculture took center stage in the panel's most recent report, missing was how the oceans at large could help in that fight. (2019-08-29)

Synthesis of UV absorbers from cashew nut shell liquid
Researchers succeeded in using cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) as a substitute for petroleum in organic synthesis. Their aim was the development of a sustainable synthesis of soluble organic UV filters. (2019-08-29)

Southern Ocean circulation patterns that keep the lid on stored carbon are more complex than previously thought
Scientists have found evidence that the horizontal circulation of carbon-rich ocean water in the subpolar Southern Ocean works in tandem with vertical circulation, together controlling how much carbon the region stores in the deep ocean or releases to the atmosphere. These findings contradict the conventional framework for carbon cycling in Antarctic waters, (2019-08-28)

Research sheds new light on Antarctic control of global climate
Scientists have made a new discovery that challenges previous understanding of the relationship between the polar Southern Ocean, next to Antarctica, and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Their findings show that, contrary to existing assumptions, biological processes far out at sea are the most important factors determining how the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide. (2019-08-28)

Glacier-fed rivers may consume atmospheric carbon dioxide
Glacier-fed rivers in northern Canada may be consuming significant amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-08-27)

Pitt researchers create breathalyzer that can detect marijuana
A team from the Department of Chemistry and the Swanson School of Engineering has developed a breathalyzer device that can measure the amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive compound in marijuana, in the user's breath. The breathalyzer was developed using carbon nanotubes, tiny tubes of carbon 100,000 times smaller than a human hair. Nanotechnology sensors can detect THC at levels comparable to or better than mass spectrometry, which is considered the gold standard for THC detection. (2019-08-27)

Would a carbon tax help to innovate more-efficient energy use?
Taxing carbon emissions would drive innovation and lead to improved energy efficiency, according to a new paper published in Joule from Carnegie's Rong Wang (now at Fudan University), Harry Saunders, and Ken Caldeira, along with Juan Moreno-Cruz of the University of Waterloo. (2019-08-27)

Individualized approach to identify 'fertile windows' could benefit many women
Menstrual cycles are considerably varied with only 13% of women having cycles that last 28 days, according to a new study led by UCL and Natural Cycles, a contraceptive app. (2019-08-26)

A new way to make valuable chemicals
A new discovery has advanced the field of carbon capture and utilization. Researchers have formed carbon-nitrogen bonds in an electrochemical carbon monoxide reduction reaction, which led to the production of high-value chemicals called amides, that are useful in a variety of industries, including pharmaceuticals. (2019-08-26)

Wildfires could permanently alter Alaska's forest composition
A team of researchers led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory projected that the combination of climate change and increased wildfires will cause the iconic evergreen conifer trees of Alaska to get pushed out in favor of broadleaf deciduous trees, which shed their leaves seasonally. (2019-08-26)

New threat from ocean acidification emerges in the Southern Ocean
Scientists investigating the effect of ocean acidification on diatoms, a key group of microscopic marine organisms, phytoplankton, say they have identified a new threat from climate change -- ocean acidification is negatively impacting the extent to which diatoms in Southern Ocean waters incorporate silica into their cell walls. The findings are important in the context of global climate change because of the implications for global carbon and silicon cycles and ultimately ocean productivity. (2019-08-26)

Study finds big increase in ocean carbon dioxide absorption along West Antarctic Peninsula
Climate change is altering the ability of the Southern Ocean off the West Antarctic Peninsula to absorb carbon dioxide, according to a Rutgers-led study, and that could magnify climate change in the long run. The study, led by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, is published in the journal Nature Climate Change. (2019-08-26)

How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake
Plants face a dilemma in dry conditions: they have to seal themselves off to prevent losing too much water but this also limits their uptake of carbon dioxide. A sensory network assures that the plant strikes the right balance. (2019-08-26)

Dangerous wild grass will be used in batteries
Hogweed, which has grown over vast territories of Russia, can be useful as a material for batteries. Scientists from NUST MISIS have investigated the possibilities of fibrous substances in the plant stems. They have turned them into electrodes -- elements of devices capable of storing energy. It was experimentally proven that the treated dangerous plant can successfully replace traditional sources of energy without compromising the quality of the batteries. (2019-08-26)

Salt marshes' capacity to sink carbon may be threatened by nitrogen pollution
Salt marshes sequester carbon at rates an order of magnitude higher than land ecosystems. A new study from the MBL Ecosystems Center indicates nitrate pollution of coastal waters stimulates the decomposition of organic matter in salt marsh sediments that normally would have remained stable, and can alter the capacity of salt marshes to sequester carbon over the long term. (2019-08-23)

Can't get thinner than this: synthesis of atomically flat boron sheets
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) find a simple method for producing atomically thin layers of oxidized borophene, a promising 2D boron-based nanomaterial that could serve in a variety of fields. (2019-08-23)

Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research
The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behavior across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers used advanced single-cell technology to isolate individual parasites and measure their gene activity. The result is the Malaria Cell Atlas, which gives the highest resolution view of malaria parasite gene expression to date and monitors how individual parasites change as they develop in both the mosquito and human host. (2019-08-22)

New study reveals carbon nanotubes measurement possible for the first time
Swansea University scientists report an entirely new approach to manipulation of carbon nanotubes that allows physical measurements to be made on carbon nanotubes that have previously only been possible by theoretical computation. (2019-08-22)

Water availability determines carbon uptake under climate warming: study
A research group led by Dr. NIU Shuli from the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that water availability in soil determines the direction of carbon-climate feedback. (2019-08-22)

More frequent wildfires in the boreal forest threaten previously protected soil carbon
University of Saskatchewan researchers have found that as major wildfires increase in Canada's North, boreal forests that have acted as carbon sinks for millennia are becoming sources of atmospheric carbon, potentially contributing to the greenhouse effect. The results were published Aug. 21 in the prestigious journal Nature. (2019-08-21)

Parasite needs chemical (lipid/nutrient) in cat intestines for sex
Toxoplasma gondii is a microbial parasite that infect humans and complete its full life cycle only in cats. New research published August 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology shows why: the sexual phase of the parasite's life cycle requires linoleic acid, a nutrient/lipid found at uniquely high levels in the felines, because cats lack a key enzyme for breaking it down. (2019-08-21)

Boreal forest fires could release deep soil carbon
Increasingly frequent and severe forest fires could burn generations-old carbon stored in the soils of boreal forests, according to results from the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) funded by NASA's Earth Science Division. Releasing this previously buried carbon into the atmosphere could change these forests' balance of carbon gain and loss, potentially accelerating warming. (2019-08-21)

Extreme wildfires threaten to turn boreal forests from carbon sinks to carbon sources
A research team investigated the impact of extreme fires on previously intact carbon stores by studying the soil and vegetation of the boreal forest and how they changed after a record-setting fire season in the Northwest Territories in 2014. They collected 200 soil samples and used radiocarbon dating to estimate the carbon age. They found combustion of legacy carbon in nearly half of the samples taken from young forests (less than 60 years old). (2019-08-21)

Scientists find precise control of terminal division during plant stomatal development
A research group led by Prof. LE Jie at the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found a genetic suppressor of flp stomatal defects. They found that RPA2a, a core subunit of Replication Protein A (RPA) complexes, acted downstream from the core cell cycle genes of CDKB1 to ensure terminal division during stomatal development and the formation of paired guard cells to create functional stomata units. (2019-08-20)

Study reveals profound patterns in globally important algae
A globally important ocean algae is mysteriously scarce in one of the most productive regions of the Atlantic Ocean, according to a new paper. A massive dataset has revealed patterns in the regions where Atlantic coccolithophores live, illuminating the inner workings of the ocean carbon cycle and raising new questions. (2019-08-20)

Plants could remove six years of carbon dioxide emissions -- if we protect them
By analysing 138 experiments, researchers have mapped the potential of today's plants and trees to store extra carbon by the end of the century. (2019-08-20)

All-in-one: New microbe degrades oil to gas
The tiny organisms cling to oil droplets and perform a great feat: As a single organism, they may produce methane from oil by a process called alkane disproportionation. Previously this was only known from symbioses between bacteria and archaea. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology have now found cells of this microbe called Methanoliparia in oil reservoirs worldwide. (2019-08-20)

New study offers roadmap for detecting changes in the ocean due to climate change
When will we see significant changes in the ocean due to climate change? A new study finds that some changes are noticeable already, while others will take up to a century. (2019-08-19)

Microorganisms build the best fuel efficient hydrogen cells
With billions of years of practice, nature has created the most energy efficient machines. One, [Ne-Fi] hydrogenase, is the oldest in microorganisms and is used for hydrogen metabolism. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, researchers at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) reveal the proton transfer pathway of this enzyme, a discovery expected to contribute to new biofuel cells. (2019-08-19)

Researchers refine guidelines for pediatric brain injuries
There are no guideliInnes on whether a noninvasive method of measuring carbon dioxide from patients' exhalations, known as end-tidal capnography, is as effective as drawing blood through a child's artery. This study published in JAMA Network Open found that measuring the carbon dioxide level through an artery is still the most accurate diagnostic for pediatric brain trauma. (2019-08-16)

Scientists assess reliability of multiple precipitable water vapor datasets in Central Asia
Scientists evaluated multiple satellite and reanalysis precipitable water vapor (PWV) datasets against radiosonde observations in Central Asia. They further constructed a skill-weighted ensemble mean of the reanalysis datasets, based on the different performances of individual datasets. (2019-08-16)

MDM2 counteracts resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors for melanoma therapy
A study from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Department of Veterans Affairs led by Anna Vilgelm, MD, Ph.D., and Ann Richmond, Ph.D., has identified a possible second-line treatment for melanoma patients. (2019-08-15)

Moon glows brighter than sun in images from NASA's Fermi
If our eyes could see gamma rays, the Moon would appear brighter than the Sun! That's how NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has seen our neighbor in space for the past decade. (2019-08-15)

Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth's carbon cycle
The Earth's carbon cycle is crucial in controlling the greenhouse gas content of our atmosphere, and ultimately our climate. (2019-08-15)

Compost key to sequestering carbon in the soil
For their 19-year study, UC Davis scientists dug roughly 6 feet down to compare soil carbon changes in different cropping systems. They found that compost is a key to storing carbon, a strategy for offsetting CO2 emissions. (2019-08-14)

Charcoal-based drug delivery system improves efficacy of common herpes drug
A study led by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago has found that combining acyclovir -- a commonly prescribed topical herpes medication -- with particles of activated carbon improves efficacy of the drug. (2019-08-14)

New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling
A new review of silicon cycling in glacial environments, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, highlights the potential importance of glaciers in exporting silicon to downstream ecosystems. (2019-08-14)

New study: Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane
As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union. (2019-08-14)

Hard-working termites crucial to forest, wetland ecosystems
Soil bedding increases microbial and termite decomposition activity (2019-08-14)

Non-native invasive insects, diseases decreasing carbon stored in US forests
A first-of-its-kind study by a team that included the United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service and Purdue University scientists finds that non-native invasive insects and diseases are reducing the amount of carbon stored in trees across the United States. (2019-08-13)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.