Current Carbon Nanotubes News and Events | Page 25

Current Carbon Nanotubes News and Events, Carbon Nanotubes News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Need more energy storage? Just hit 'print'
Drexel University researchers have developed a conductive ink made from a special type of material they discovered, called MXene, that was used by the Trinity College researchers to print components for electronic devices. The ink is additive-free, which means it can print the finished devices in one step without any special finishing treatments. (2019-04-17)

Modern Midas turns bacterial components into catalysts
A team from University of Science and Technology of China found a way to transform bacterial cellulose into solid acid catalysts, just like the power of Midas to turn a stone into gold. (2019-04-17)

New research offers solution to riddle of ocean carbon storage
Research by a team of the world's leading oceanographers has proposed a new explanation for how the ocean absorbs and stores carbon, solving a riddle that has long puzzled scientists. It's well established that carbon in the atmosphere is absorbed by phytoplankton and transported to the ocean floor as the microscopic organisms die and sink by gravity through the water. (2019-04-17)

Balancing the ocean carbon budget
How exactly does the ocean -- the Earth's largest carbon sink -- capture and store carbon? The answer to this question will become increasingly important as the planet warms and as we try to get ahead of a runaway climate scenario. (2019-04-17)

Climate engineering needs to look at the big picture, says researcher
Climate engineering research is too focused on specific aspects of individual projects, argues Nadine Mengis. She believes broader studies about the impacts of these efforts will have on other Earth system variables (2019-04-16)

How inland waters 'breathe' carbon -- and what it means for global systems
A new Yale study reveals important insights into the factors that influence the release of greenhouse gases from rivers and streams, including a key relationship between storm events, ecology, and topography in moderating this release. (2019-04-16)

Plastic's carbon footprint
From campaigns against microplastics to news of the great Pacific garbage patch, public awareness is growing about the outsized effect plastic has on the world's oceans. However, its effect on the air is far less obvious. Plastic production, use, and disposal all emit prodigious amounts of greenhouse gasses, but scientists haven't had a firm grasp on the scope. (2019-04-15)

Electric vehicle adoption improves air quality and climate outlook
A Northwestern University study quantified the differences in air pollution generated from battery-powered electric vehicles versus internal combustion engines. The researchers found that even when their electricity is generated from combustion sources, electric vehicles have a net positive impact on air quality and climate change. (2019-04-12)

New tunable nanomaterials possible due to flexible process invented by Bath physicists
Physicists at the University of Bath have developed a flexible process allowing the synthesis in a single flow of a wide range of novel nanomaterials with various morphologies, with potential applications in areas including optics and sensors. (2019-04-11)

2D gold quantum dots are atomically tunable with nanotubes
Gold atoms ski along boron nitride nanotubes and stabilize in metallic monolayers. The resulting gold quantum dots could be a promising material for future electronics and quantum computing. (2019-04-11)

Human activities shift dominant tree-fungi pairing in North America
The dominant type of tree-fungi pairing found in North American forests has shifted during the past three decades, in response in human activities such as increased nitrogen deposition and fire suppression, as well as climate change. (2019-04-10)

Greener, more efficient natural gas filtration
MIT researchers have developed a new polymer membrane that can dramatically improve the efficiency of natural gas purification, while reducing its environmental impact. (2019-04-09)

Shrinking the carbon footprint of a chemical in everyday objects
MIT chemical engineers have devised an alternative approach to synthesizing epoxides, a type of chemical that is found in many products, including plastics, pharmaceuticals and textiles. Their approach could reduce the greenhouse gas emissions produced by current manufacturing techniques. (2019-04-09)

Climate change impacts peatland CO2 gas exchange primarily via moisture conditions
A new study led by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and Natural Resources Institute Finland suggests that peatland CO2 exchange is more strongly influenced by drying than warming as such, and that soil moisture may be critical to determining whether fen ecosystems are able to adapt to a changing climate. The study was recently published in Global Change Biology. (2019-04-08)

Carbon lurking in deep ocean threw ancient climate switch, say researchers
A million years ago, a longtime pattern of alternating glaciations and warm periods dramatically changed, when ice ages suddenly became longer and more intense. Scientists have long suspected that this was connected to the slowdown of a key Atlantic Ocean current system that today once again is slowing. A new study of sediments from the Atlantic bottom directly links this slowdown with a massive buildup of carbon dragged from the air into the abyss. (2019-04-08)

Renewables are a better investment than carbon capture for tackling climate change
Solar panels and wind turbines coupled with energy storage offer a better hope for tackling climate change than trying to capture carbon from fossil fuel power stations, according to new research published by Nature Energy. New research shows that resources that would be spent on developing and installing carbon capture technologies would be better invested in creating more solar panels and wind turbines and focusing on developing energy storage options to support these instead. (2019-04-08)

Carbon-negative power generation for China
Researchers from the Harvard and China have analyzed technical and economic viability for China to move towards carbon-negative electric power generation. (2019-04-08)

Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth
Ancient organic matter of biological origin has been tracked in multiple samples of rock spanning over 2,000 million years of Earth's history, according to UCL researchers. (2019-04-08)

The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon
As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding. A government-run program in the Amazon rainforest in northwestern Brazil transforms forest carbon value into public wealth by focusing on labor rather than land rights. In the Brazilian state of Acre, some of the revenue from carbon credits is distributed to rural laborers and family farmers without land rights. A Dartmouth study examines the benefits and risks associated with Acre's unique approach. (2019-04-05)

Metal-free catalyst to convert aldehyde into ketone, a basic structure of pharmaceuticals
We succeeded in synthesizing a ketone, a basic structure of many pharmaceuticals, from an aldehyde and a carboxylic acid using N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst under mild conditions. Conventional methods for such syntheses required transition-metal catalysts. Our method is also applicable to conversion of a carboxylic acid, a part of many pharmaceuticals, into a corresponding ketone. A reaction pathway involving single electron transfer is proposed. Our novel method is expected to contribute to acceleration of drug discovery. (2019-04-03)

study looks to iron from microbes for climate help
Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could 'fertilize' microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new paper in Frontiers. The paper proposes a novel way to provide iron to large areas of the ocean, 30 percent of which is poor in the essential element. (2019-04-03)

Restore natural forests to meet global climate goals
International plans to restore forests to combat global warming are flawed and will fall far short of meeting 1.5C climate targets, according to new research by UCL and University of Edinburgh scientists. (2019-04-02)

New record on the growth of graphene single crystals
An exciting rapid growth of large graphene single crystal on liquid Cu with the rate up to 79 μm s-1 based on the liquid metal chemical vapor deposition strategy was released by Lei Fu et al. in Science China Materials. (2019-04-02)

Teaching computers to intelligently design 'billions' of possible materials
At the University of Missouri, researchers in the College of Engineering are applying one of the first uses of deep learning -- the technology computers use to intelligently perform tasks such as recognizing language and driving autonomous vehicles -- to the field of materials science. (2019-04-02)

London cyclists warned evening commute has the dirtiest air, so pick a clean route home
Cyclists in London should take a different route back home during evening peak-time hours to avoid breathing in harmful black carbon from vehicles. (2019-04-01)

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2019
ORNL used artificial intelligence to analyze data from published medical studies about bullying to reveal the potential of broader impacts, such as mental illness or disease; New low-cost, printed, flexible sensor can wrap around power cables to precisely monitor electrical loads from household appliances; ORNL is evaluating paths for licensing remotely operated microreactors, which could provide clean energy to isolated regions; ORNL-led team used carbon nanotubes to improve process that removes salt from water. (2019-04-01)

Odd reaction creates a stir in the lab
Rice University chemists show how PTFE - aka Teflon - in standard lab stir bars affects a chemical reaction used to reduce nanotubes, skewing the results. (2019-03-29)

Speedier stomata in optogenetically enhanced plants improve growth and conserve water
By introducing an extra ion channel into the stomata of mustard plants, researchers have developed a new a way to speed up the stomatal response in their leaves. (2019-03-28)

Freshwater coastal erosion alters global carbon budget
Shoreline erosion can transform freshwater wetlands from carbon-storage pools to carbon sources, according to a new study led by Illinois State Geological Survey researchers. Wave action and high water levels sweep away soils and plants at a rate much higher than nature can replace them. An accurate measurement of this carbon budget imbalance may help better prioritize coastal management efforts and improve global carbon-cycle models. (2019-03-27)

HIV/tuberculosis co-infection: Tunneling towards better diagnosis
1.2 million people in the world are co-infected by the bacteria which causes tuberculosis and AIDS. This combination is deadly: it makes patient diagnosis and treatment difficult, and increases the pathogenicity of these two infectious agents. A team led by researchers at the CNRS and Inserm have revealed that in the presence of tuberculosis, HIV-1 moves from one cell to the next via nanotubes which form between macrophages, drastically increasing the percentage of infected cells. (2019-03-26)

The solid Earth breathes
The solid Earth breathes as volcanoes ''exhale'' gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) -- which are essential in regulating global climate -- while carbon ultimately from CO2 returns into the deep Earth when oceanic tectonic plates are forced to descend into the mantle at subduction zones. (2019-03-26)

Microorganisms are the main emitters of carbon in Amazonian waters
A study performed with microorganisms inhabiting floodplains, which comprises 20 percent of the whole Amazon, showed that the microbial food chain produces 10 times more CO2 than the classical food chain, mostly by decomposing organic matter. (2019-03-26)

Study examines commercial hybrid-electric aircraft, reduced carbon emissions
Although we're still a long way from commercial airplanes powered by a combination of fossil fuel and batteries, a recent feasibility study at the University of Illinois explored fuel/battery configurations and the energy lifecycle to learn the tradeoffs needed to yield the greatest reductions in carbon dioxide emissions. (2019-03-25)

Scientists turn back evolutionary clock to develop high-CO2-tolerant microalgae
A team of scientists led by Prof. XU Jian from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof. Ansgar Poetsch from Ruhr University, developed a way to improve tolerance to high levels of CO2 in the industrial oil-producing microalgae Nannochloropsis. (2019-03-24)

Study shows how electricity-eating microbes use electrons to fix carbon dioxide
A Washington University team showed how a phototrophic microbe called Rhodopseudomonas palustris takes up electrons from conductive substances like metal oxides or rust to reduce carbon dioxide. (2019-03-22)

Alpine tundra releases long-frozen CO2 to the atmosphere, exacerbating climate warming
Thawing permafrost in high-altitude mountain ecosystems may be a stealthy, underexplored contributor to atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. (2019-03-21)

Carbon monoxide detectors could warn of extraterrestrial life
A UC Riverside-led team used computer models of chemistry in the biosphere and atmosphere to identify two intriguing scenarios in which carbon monoxide readily accumulates in the atmospheres of living planets. The models show that relatively high amounts of carbon monoxide are compatible with life and should not automatically rule out the possibility of life on some planets. (2019-03-19)

Uncertain projections help to reveal the truth about future climate change
A team of four scientists from the US and the UK explain how differing climate model projections can be used collectively to reduce uncertainties in future climate change, in a paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change. (2019-03-18)

How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers at the University of Sydney have mapped out how carbonate formations formed from 'marine snow' have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Andria Dutkiewicz warns that global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. (2019-03-13)

X-ray analysis of carbon nanostructures helps material design
Nanostructures made of carbon are extremely versatile: they can absorb ions in batteries and supercapacitors, store gases, and desalinate water. How well they cope with the task at hand depends largely on the structural features of the nanopores. A new study from the HZB has now shown that structural changes that occur due to morphology transition with increasing temperature of the synthesis can also be measured directly -- using small-angle X-ray scattering. The results have now been published in the journal Carbon. (2019-03-13)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.