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Current Cardiac Arrest News and Events, Cardiac Arrest News Articles.
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Remote cardiac rehabilitation programs are effective alternatives to on-site services
Outpatient cardiovascular rehabilitation programs were suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic, limiting patients' access to these important services. Health care systems in Canada and Japan implemented virtual or remote cardiac rehabilitation programs in response to the public health emergency. These programs were found to be as effective as in-person, outpatient rehabilitation services and could help to increase equitable access and participation rates for cardiac patients. (2020-11-09)

New medication to treat shock caused by blood or fluid loss found safe and effective
Hypovolemic shock, caused by severe loss of blood or body fluids, can be deadly if not treated promptly. Centhaquine is a new medication for the treatment of hypovolemic shock that increases blood flow to the heart and organs to prevent organ failure and death. It is still in clinical trials in the U.S. Results from a small, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in India found that centhaquine significantly improved blood pressure, blood lactate levels and reduced death rate when added to standard treatment. (2020-11-09)

Machine learning helps predict survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Machine learning predictions about the survival rate of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were more accurate when neighborhood-level factors were added to the data analysis. Future research can use this newly developed model to identify neighborhood-level intervention methods to decrease death rates from an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (2020-11-09)

Acute exposure to higher ozone levels linked to higher risk of cardiac arrest
Analysis of data from 187,000 patients found that higher ozone levels were associated with a higher risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. These findings may have important public health implications for recommendations on ozone regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2020-11-09)

Serious disparities in care and outcomes found among Black and non-white heart patients
Adults who are Black or from other underrepresented racial/ethnic groups received up to 10% fewer early treatments for heart problems compared to white patients. When compared to whites, Black patients had longer hospital stays and fewer discharges to home. Hispanics, Asians, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans all had higher in-hospital death rates than white patients. (2020-11-09)

Extra precautions during CPR due to the pandemic do not have a negative impact on survival
A U.S. medical center compared outcomes of patients in 2019 and 2020 who had in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to determine if safety precautions due to the pandemic affect patient survival. Researchers analyzed results of COVID-19 patients who had experienced in-hospital CPR and compared them to patients without COVID-19 who had experienced in-hospital CPR and found no significant difference in patient outcomes between the groups. (2020-11-09)

Genetic mutation could worsen heart function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients
DALLAS - Nov. 4, 2020 - A mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis may accelerate heart function decline in those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a new study by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The findings, published online recently in the Journal of the American Heart Association, could help doctors develop new strategies to preserve heart function in this population, potentially extending patients' lives. (2020-11-04)

Implantable device can monitor and treat heart disease
Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at UH, led a group of researchers that has reported developing a cardiac patch made from fully rubbery electronics that can be placed directly on the heart to collect electrophysiological activity, temperature, heartbeat and other indicators, all at the same time. (2020-11-03)

Mobile smartphone technology is associated with better clinical outcomes for OHCA
Mobile smartphone technology can accelerate first responder dispatch and may be instrumental to improving out?of?hospital cardiac arrest (OCHA) survival. (2020-10-30)

New strategies suggested for critical heart care in the ICU
Critically ill heart patients are at increased risk of complications that are potentially preventable and associated with death, longer hospital stays and higher costs. Best practices to prevent complications include meticulous hand hygiene among the health care team, prompt removal of invasive medical devices and implementing a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals from various specialties. (2020-10-29)

Cardiac MRI contrast agents carry low risk of adverse events
Contrast agents used to improve views of the heart on MRI carry a very low risk of allergic reactions, vomiting and other acute adverse events, according to a large new study. The findings come three years after the European Union enacted new regulations on the contrast agents. (2020-10-29)

A patch that could help heal broken hearts
According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide in recent years. During a heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), a blocked artery and the resulting oxygen deprivation cause massive cardiac cell death, blood vessel impairment and inflammation. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a cardiac patch with tiny engineered blood vessels that improved recovery from MI in rats and pigs. (2020-10-28)

Study reinforces drug's potential to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
WSU research sheds new light on a molecule that may be used to treat heart conditions that can lead to stroke, heart attack and other forms of heart disease. (2020-10-27)

A new playbook: COVID-19, athletes' hearts and return to play
In a special report published in JAMA Cardiology, sports cardiologists offer guidance for athletes' return to play after they have recovered from COVID-19. The article addresses the most common questions posed by the media, in clinics and athletic training rooms, and during discussions among cardiologists who care for athletes. (2020-10-27)

A heart-breast cancer-on-a-chip monitoring system
Dual-organ system enables the measurement of cardiac toxicity arising from breast cancer chemotherapy. A collaborative team, which includes a group from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation, has developed an organs-on-a-chip system that more widely examines the responses of breast cancer and heart tissues to therapeutic breast cancer drugs. (2020-10-26)

High fat or 'ketogenic' diets could prevent, reverse heart failure
Research from Saint Louis University finds that high fat or ''ketogenic'' diets could completely prevent, or even reverse heart failure caused by a metabolic process. The research team, led by Kyle S. McCommis, Ph.D., assistant professor in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at SLU, looked at a metabolic process that seems to be turned down in failing human hearts. (2020-10-26)

For pregnant women with heart disease, multidisciplinary care may be essential
Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of maternal mortality in the United States, but a new study suggests specialized cardio-obstetrics teams may improve outcomes. (2020-10-26)

New model predicts which patients with kidney disease may develop heartbeat irregularities
* A new model that incorporates a type of artificial intelligence can accurately predict which individuals with chronic kidney disease face a high risk of developing atrial fibrillation. * Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-24)

ASTRO: Proton therapy for lung cancer may help reduce risk of heart diseases
Treating lung cancer patients with proton therapy may help reduce the risk of radiation-induced heart diseases. (2020-10-23)

MRI safely performed in patients with pacemakers and ICDs
MRI examinations can be performed safely in patients with non-MR compatible cardiac devices, including those who are pacemaker-dependent or have abandoned leads, according to a new study. (2020-10-22)

Updated CPR guidelines tackle health disparities management of opioid-related emergencies and physical, emotional recovery
Updated CPR guidelines address health disparities and the management of opioid-related emergencies as well; early bystander and AED intervention remains key to survival. The Chain of Survival has been expanded to include a recovery link, which emphasizes physical, social, and emotional needs of patients and their caregivers after survivors leave the hospital. CPR training to now include guidance on responding to victims of suspected opioid overdose. (2020-10-21)

Sanctuary policies protect immigrants but don't threaten public safety
Stanford researcher David Hausman analyzed ICE deportations data for 296 large counties combined with FBI crime data. Sanctuary counties experienced a significant decrease in deportations in the months after sanctuary policies were adopted. Deportations of individuals with violent convictions did not decrease, but deportation of individuals without convictions decreased by about half. Sanctuary policies did not have a significant effect on crime rates or the rate at which police arrested individuals for reported crimes. (2020-10-19)

New dimensions in the treatment of muscle spasticity after stroke and nervous system defects
Chronic muscle spasticity after nervous system defects like stroke, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and painful low back pain affect more than 10% of the population, with a socioeconomic cost of about 500 billion USD. Currently, there is no satisfying remedy to help these suffering people, which generates an immense medical need for a new generation antispastic drug. Drug candidate MPH-220 could mean new hope for millions of patients suffering from spasticity. (2020-10-16)

Results from the FORECAST Trial reported at TCT Connect
In the FORECAST randomized clinical trial, the use of fractional flow reserve management derived from computed tomography (FFRCT) did not significantly reduce costs but did reduce the use of invasive coronary angiography (ICA). (2020-10-16)

Rare congenital heart defect rescued by protease inhibition
A research team at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) has successfully used small molecules to restore normal heart and valve development in an animal model for Mucolipidosis II (ML II), a rare genetic disorder. The study is reported in this month's JCI Insight. (2020-10-15)

Tied to undiagnosed disease, aortic dissection in pregnancy proves difficult to predict
The 100th report out of the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection details the experiences of 29 women who faced this rare life-threatening complication while pregnant. (2020-10-14)

NIRS-IVUSimaging can help identify high-risk plaques that can lead to adverse outcomes
New data from the PROSPECT II study shows that NIRS-IVUS intracoronary imaging can help identify angiographically non-obstructive lesions with high-risk characteristics for future adverse cardiac outcomes. (2020-10-14)

Researchers discover a cell type responsible for cardiac repair after infarction
The researcher of the Faculty of Science of the UMA Adrián Ruiz-Villalba, who is also member of the Andalusian Center for Nanomedicine and Biotechnology (BIONAND) and the Biomedical Research Institute of Malaga (IBIMA), is the first author of an international study that has identified the heart cells in charge of repairing the damage caused to this organ after infarction. This study has been recently published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, first in the world dedicated to cardiovascular research. (2020-10-13)

In New York City, behavioral "nudges" improve court attendance
Improving communication around and awareness of critical court information through behavioral interventions, or ''nudges,'' may be more effective at improving court attendance for low-level criminal offenses than threats of further punishment, a new study finds. (2020-10-08)

Simple solutions reduce court no-shows and subsequent arrest warrants
For low-level offenses in New York City, text nudges and a redesigned summons form decreased court no-show rates by about 20% and led to 30,000 fewer arrest warrants over three years, according to research from criminologist Aurélie Ouss of the University of Pennsylvania. 'Lack of awareness is likely a barrier that explains some criminal justice failures, and these can have really big consequences,' she says. (2020-10-08)

New approach helps EMTs better assess chest pain en route to hospital
A study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Health shows that on-scene use of a new protocol and advanced diagnostic equipment can help paramedics better identify patients at high risk for adverse cardiac events. (2020-10-07)

Hearts harvested from pigs may soon help solve chronic shortages of these donor organs
An analysis discusses scientific breakthroughs that have overcome obstacles to cardiac xenotransplantation. (2020-10-07)

Vigorous exercise, spongy heart
Sscientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares have used cardiac magnetic resonance technology to measure exercise-related hypertrabeculation in a general, non-athlete population. The results of the study have important practical implications because misdiagnosis of noncompaction cardiomyopathy in people who exercise regularly (whether professional athletes or amateurs) can trigger medical recommendations to stop physical exercise unnecessarily (2020-10-05)

Study: Unnecessary stress testing performed prior to knee and hip replacement surgeries
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine shows the overall rate of preoperative stress testing for hip and knee replacements is and has been decreasing consistently since 2006. Still, researchers found, 30,000 out of every 100,000 stress tests performed each year were unnecessary, as the tests didn't decrease the frequency of complications such as heart attacks or stopped hearts. (2020-10-01)

Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with COVID-19
Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with covid-19 and is associated with poor survival, particularly among patients aged 80 or older, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-09-30)

Cardiac arrest, poor survival rates common in sickest patients with COVID-19
Study shows critically ill patients with the novel coronavirus have high rates of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes even after CPR, an effect most strongly seen in older patients. (2020-09-30)

Cardiac arrhythmias linked to gene mutations
Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias can be linked to the functional and structural consequences of gene mutations. (2020-09-29)

Discovery of cells that heal cardiac damage after infarction
Researchers at Cima and the Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain) have led an international study identifying the cardiac cells responsible for repairing the damage to this organ after infarction. These ''restorative'' cells are a subpopulation of cardiac fibroblasts that play a fundamental role in the creation of the collagen scar needed to avoid the rupture of the ventricular wall. The research also reveals the molecular mechanisms involved in the activation of these cells and the regulation of their function. (2020-09-29)

Study: Childhood chemo alters heart's caretaker cells
Why do 20% of children who receive cancer chemotherapy go on to develop heart failure later in life? UT Health San Antonio researchers led by Gregory Aune, MD, PhD, are studying this question and report a clue in a new journal article. (2020-09-29)

Exosome treatment improves recovery from heart attacks in a preclinical study
Research in pigs shows that using the exosomes naturally produced from a mixture of heart muscle cells, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells -- which were all derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells -- yields regenerative benefits equivalent to the injected human induced pluripotent stem cell-cardiac cells. (2020-09-29)

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