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Current Cardiac Surgery News and Events, Cardiac Surgery News Articles.
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Predicting long-term cognitive decline following delirium
Evidence suggests that experiencing delirium after surgery can lead to long-term cognitive decline in older adults. (2017-03-15)
Researchers to develop 'wearable' robotic tools for surgery
A collaborative team of researchers is to develop a wearable robotic system for minimally invasive surgery, also known as keyhole surgery, that will offer surgeons natural and dexterous movement as well as the ability to 'sense,' 'see,' control and safely navigate through the surgical environment. (2017-03-14)
Study identifies modifiable risk factors for elbow injuries in baseball pitchers
Elbow injuries continue to be on the rise in baseball players, especially pitchers, yet little is known about the actual variables that influence these injuries. (2017-03-14)
Noninvasive imaging helps predict heart attacks
Noninvasive CT angiography and stress tests can help predict which patients are likely to suffer a heart attack or other adverse cardiovascular event, according to a new study. (2017-03-14)
Shared doctor-patient orthopaedic treatment decisions improve outcomes, patient experience
Well-informed patients who decide with their orthopaedic surgeon what treatment is best for them have better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction rates, according to new study presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). (2017-03-14)
Increased risk of postop infection when surgery closely follows epidural steroid injection
Research conducted at the University of Virginia suggests that patients may wish to take a one- to three-month break from lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESIs) before undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. (2017-03-14)
Home may be the best place to recover after total joint replacement surgery
Despite higher costs, many doctors recommend and some patients prefer, recovery at an in-patient rehabilitation facility following total hip (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. (2017-03-14)
Study: Most athletic patients return to sports, highly satisfied with ACL reconstruction
A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that most athletic patients who have reconstructive surgery for a torn ACL are highly satisfied with the procedure and able to return to sports. (2017-03-14)
Study cautions against use of bone morphogenetic proteins in children's spine surgery
Bone morphogenetic proteins, commonly used off-label to enhance pediatric spinal fusion, did not improve revision rates for pediatric spinal fusion, according to a study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery. (2017-03-14)
Bariatric surgery impacts joint replacement outcomes in very obese patients
A study from Hospital for Special Surgery finds that in morbidly obese patients, bariatric surgery performed prior to a total hip or knee replacement can reduce in-hospital and 90-day postoperative complications and improve patient health, but it does not reduce the risk of needing a revision surgery. (2017-03-14)
Location of spinal correction influences risk of PJK development
A new study reports for the first time that PJK risk following lumbar spinal fusion depends on the level of the spine fused. (2017-03-14)
Medication to treat anxiety, depression may reduce hip, knee replacement revision risk
Patients who take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), commonly prescribed medications used to treat anxiety and depression, may experience a reduced risk of revision surgery following total hip (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR), according to new research presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). (2017-03-14)
For surgeons in the OR, a way to fight bad posture
Surgeons face psychological stress. Less understood is the physical stress they endure from spending hours in awkward positions in the operating room. (2017-03-14)
High rate of return to running following arthroscopic hip surgery
Ninety-six percent of patients who were recreational or competitive runners prior to developing hip bone spurs returned to their sport within nine months of arthroscopic surgery, according to research presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). (2017-03-14)
Nearly all shoulder replacement patients under age 55 return to sports
A new study being presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), found that 96.4 percent of recreational athletes, age 55 and younger, who underwent total shoulder replacement surgery returned to at least one sport, on average, within seven months of surgery. (2017-03-14)
High cholesterol levels linked with rotator cuff surgery failure
Patients with higher cholesterol levels face a significantly greater risk for failure of minimally invasive (arthroscopic) rotator cuff surgery, according to a new study to be presented on Friday, March 17, at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). (2017-03-14)
Failed fertility therapy associated with increased risk of later cardiac disease
Women who undergo fertility therapy, but do not get pregnant, have a higher risk of developing long-term cardiovascular disease, compared with women who become pregnant, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2017-03-13)
Study will determine which type 2 diabetes patients benefit most from bariatric surgery
Bariatric surgery can reverse type 2 diabetes. But which patients with type 2 diabetes will benefit most from surgery? (2017-03-10)
Gene found to cause sudden death in young people
Researchers from Canada, South Africa and Italy have identified a new gene that can lead to sudden death among young people and athletes. (2017-03-09)
New 3-D technology improving patient care for complex kidney surgeries
Surgeons use unique 3-D solution to prepare for complex surgery that includes a glasses-free 3-D monitor in the operating room that allows them to navigate patient's atypical anatomy. (2017-03-09)
Opioids before surgery means higher costs, more problems afterward, U-M study finds
Surgery patients often go home from the hospital with a prescription for painkillers to take as they recover. (2017-03-09)
Staying a heartbeat ahead of hackers
Nearly a million new forms of malware are unleashed on the world every day. (2017-03-08)
Broadly adopted transfusion practice may not benefit patients without traumatic injury
A study from investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital finds that a blood transfusion practice previously studied only in patients with severe traumatic injuries has been widely adopted within the hospital for surgical patients without traumatic injuries, for whom it may not be beneficial. (2017-03-08)
Study finds knee surgery holds even in heavier patients
A new study by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that heavier patients had no greater risk of their meniscus repair surgery failing than those who weren't as heavy. (2017-03-06)
Screening for heart disease may lead to prevention, better treatments
Through computed tomography (CT) images of the heart and other types of imaging, build-up of dangerous coronary plaques -- which restrict the flow of blood to the heart -- can be detected, even before a person develops symptoms of heart disease. (2017-03-06)
Researchers find positive long-term colic surgery results in horses
Many horse owners and equine veterinarians find themselves facing a difficult decision when it comes to treating a horse surgically for colic, with concerns including postoperative performance and expense. (2017-03-02)
Physical therapy proves as effective as surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome
Physical therapy is as effective as surgery in treating carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a new study published in the March 2017 issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy® (JOSPT®). (2017-03-02)
Cause of killer cardiac disease identified by new method
A team of researchers have invented a new method to identify the origin of irregular electrical 'storm waves' in the heart. (2017-03-02)
Study finds patients more likely to receive surgical intervention for narrowed arteries in fee-for-service
Individuals were more likely to undergo surgery to treat narrowed arteries when they were treated by fee-for-service physicians in the private sector compared with salary-based military physicians, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery. (2017-03-01)
New plastic surgery statistics reveal focus on face and fat
New data released by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) reveals that Americans want to put their best face and body forward as their annual plastic surgery procedural statistics show a three percent growth in cosmetic procedures over the last year. (2017-03-01)
Study identifies strategies to improve knee replacement outcomes in patients with obesity
Obesity affects 35 percent of the adult population in the US. (2017-03-01)
Neither increased access to surgery nor reduced costs achieved in states that 'opt-out' of requiring physician supervision for anesthesia
'Opting-out' of the Medicare rule that requires anesthesia to be administered with physician supervision has little or no impact on access to either inpatient or outpatient surgery, according to a study published in Health Economics Review. (2017-03-01)
Shorter herceptin breast cancer treatment may produce better results
Breast cancer patients who receive the drug Herceptin for nine weeks as part of their post-surgery chemotherapy regime may enjoy better health outcomes, according to new research led by UCL, compared to those who receive it for 12 months, the period currently recommended in the English National Health Service. (2017-03-01)
FASEB Science Research Conference: Ion Channel Regulation
This SRC will highlight the latest research on mechanisms of ion channel regulation and its impact on the physiology of diverse cell types. (2017-02-28)
Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery
Light beamed into a patient's blood through an optical fiber can determine whether blood is clotting during an operation, continuously and in real time. (2017-02-27)
Time for physicians to prepare for impending appropriate use mandate
Within a year, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will implement a provision in the Protecting Access to Medicare Act that requires physicians to consult appropriate use criteria using CMS-approved computer-based clinical decision support mechanisms when ordering advanced imaging procedures. (2017-02-27)
Controversial test could be leading to unnecessary open heart operations
A University of Leicester researcher leads an aortic stenosis study. (2017-02-24)
Boston researcher receives global surgery award
Maunil Bhatt, M.D., a post graduate resident in the Department of Surgery at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center (BMC), was recently honored with a Global Surgery Research Fellowship Award by the Association for Academic Surgery (AAS) at their 12th Annual Academic Conference. (2017-02-23)
TSRI researchers find standard pacemakers and defibrillators safe for MRI using a new protocol
The MagnaSafe Registry, a new multicenter study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has demonstrated that appropriately screened and monitored patients with standard or non-MRI-conditional pacemakers and defibrillators can undergo MRI at a field strength of 1.5 tesla without harm. (2017-02-22)
CredibleMeds launches mobile app to expand access to online QTdrugs database
CredibleMeds, the internationally recognized authority on drugs that increase the risk of heart arrhythmia and sudden death, has released a free mobile application to make its online QTdrugs database instantly available for healthcare providers and patients. (2017-02-22)
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