Current Cardiovascular Angiography News and Events

Current Cardiovascular Angiography News and Events, Cardiovascular Angiography News Articles.
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Give the heart a ketone? It may be beneficial
There is growing evidence that ketone bodies may be beneficial to heart disease patients regardless of the method of delivery used to increase ketone delivery to the heart. A Journal of the American College of Cardiology review paper examines emerging evidence regarding ketone bodies' effects on the heart and the potential for ketone therapy as a cardiovascular intervention in heart disease patients. (2021-02-23)

Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-22)

Periodontal disease increases risk of major cardiovascular events
People with periodontitis are at higher risk of experiencing major cardiovascular events, according to new research from Forsyth Institute and Harvard University scientists and colleagues. (2021-02-21)

Study examines aspirin and statin use among older Americans
An analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicates that while adults aged 75 years and older do not benefit from taking aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease, many do so on a regular basis. (2021-02-18)

Radiomics shows cocaine fuels coronary artery disease risk
Radiomics--the extraction of very detailed quantitative features from medical images--provides a refined understanding of how cocaine use and other risk factors affect the course of coronary artery disease, according to a new study. Researchers said the study shows the power of radiomics to improve understanding of not just cardiovascular disease, but cancer and other conditions as well. (2021-02-16)

Mother's heart health in pregnancy impacts child's heart health in adolescence
A mother's heart health while she is pregnant may have a significant impact on her child's cardiovascular health in early adolescence (ages 10 to 14), according to a new study. It is the first study to examine the implications of a mother's cardiovascular health during pregnancy for offspring health in the longer term. (2021-02-16)

CPAP treatment increases physical activity in adults with sleep apnea, heart disease
A new study found that treating obstructive sleep apnea with CPAP therapy increased self-reported physical activity in adults with a history of heart disease. (2021-02-16)

Mid-life cardiovascular disease prevention may protect against later dementia
Employing cardiovascular disease prevention strategies in mid-life may delay or stop the brain alterations that can lead to dementia later in life, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-15)

Women have a lower range of 'normal' blood pressure than men
A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that women have a lower ''normal'' blood pressure range compared to men. The findings were published today in the peer-reviewed journal Circulation. (2021-02-15)

Research highlights ways to protect astronaut cardiovascular health from space radiation
In the inky blackness of space an invisible threat is ever present - radiation. It can have a huge array of negative effects on astronaut health, including cardiovascular disease. However, if we are ever to journey to the red planet, we will need to understand and reduce this risk. A new review charts a course through what we know about the cardiovascular risks of space radiation, and the best ways to protect space travelers. (2021-02-12)

ACC urges COVID-19 vaccine prioritization for highest risk heart disease patients
COVID-19 vaccine prioritization should prioritize those with advanced cardiovascular (CVD) disease over well-managed CVD disease, according to an American College of Cardiology (ACC) health policy statement published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). (2021-02-12)

New guidance on how cardiac patients with diabetes can exercise more safely
Cardiac patients who also have diabetes will be able to do their rehabilitation exercises more safely, thanks to the world's first guidance on the subject, which has been published by international experts including a Swansea University academic. The guidance will be a crucial resource for healthcare professionals, so they can help the growing number of cardiac rehabilitation patients who also have diabetes. (2021-02-04)

Study reveals how air pollution may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease
A new study has found a link between high levels of air pollution at an individual's home address and an elevated risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Air pollution exposure appears to heighten the production of inflammatory cells in the bone marrow, triggering inflammation of the arteries. (2021-02-04)

Care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement at heart of improving access to care
The American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit will feature several poster presentations on care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement that offer innovative concepts to combat access to care, especially during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and as the broader health care system works to improve health equity. Research examines the rapid adoption of virtual outpatient care, enabling rural primary care teams to improve cardiovascular health and optimizing emergency room use after clinic hours. (2021-02-01)

Study links intensive BP lowering to reduced CV risk in patients exposed to air pollution
In the study 'The Benefits of Intensive Versus Standard Blood Pressure Treatment According to Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure' published this week in the journal Hypertension, researchers at University Hospitals (UH) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine found intensive BP lowering is effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients exposed to high levels of air pollution. (2021-02-01)

Automated AI algorithm uses routine imaging to predict cardiovascular risk
Investigators teamed up to develop and evaluate a deep learning system that may help change this. The system automatically measures coronary artery calcium from CT scans to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about cardiovascular prevention. (2021-01-29)

Leading cardiovascular organizations call for urgent action to reduce air pollution
Air pollution is a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Long-term exposure to air pollution has also been linked to an increased risk of death from COVID-19. This dangerous 'triple threat' of air pollution, COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease should be taken seriously, warn major health authorities. (2021-01-28)

Hypertension symptoms in women often mistaken for menopause
Pregnancy complications and early menopause increase women's future risk of heart disease. Cardiologists, gynaecologists and endocrinologists recommend how to help middle-aged women prevent later heart problems in a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) consensus document published today in European Heart Journal, a journal of the ESC. ''Physicians should intensify the detection of hypertension in middle-aged women,'' states the document. (2021-01-26)

Male breast cancer patients face high prevalence of heart disease risk factors
Male breast cancer patients were found to have a high prevalence of cardiovascular conditions, in a small study of this rare patient population presented at the American College of Cardiology's Advancing the Cardiovascular Care of the Oncology Patient Virtual course. (2021-01-25)

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1263, Yao Dong, Jun-E Liu and Ling Song from the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery. (2021-01-22)

Mayo Clinic study indicates age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks. Mayo Clinic researchers discuss these sex and age differences in study findings published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2021-01-20)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease and stroke risk
Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart. (2021-01-18)

CVIA publishes selected abstracts from the 31st GW-ICC Conference
Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, publishes selected abstracts from the 31st Great Wall International Cardiology (GW-ICC) Conference, October 19 - 25, 2020 Beijing, January 13, 2021: Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA), in its role as the official journal of the Great Wall International Cardiology Conference (GW-ICC), has published selected abstracts from the 31st GW-ICC. Abstracts are now online at https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cscript/cvia/2020/00000005/a00101s1/art00001 (2021-01-13)

New research reveals early warning sign for heart disease
The build-up of calcium in a major artery outside of the heart could predict future heart attack or stroke, a new Edith Cowan University led study has demonstrated. (2021-01-13)

COVID-19 pandemic indirectly disrupted heart disease care
Deaths from ischemic heart disease and hypertensive diseases in the United States increased during the COVID-19 pandemic over the prior year, while globally, COVID-19 was associated with significant disruptions in cardiovascular disease testing. These findings are from two papers publishing in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the indirect effects of the pandemic on cardiovascular disease patients and their care. (2021-01-11)

Dual smoking and vaping doesn't cut cardiovascular risk: Boston University study
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death associated with smoking cigarettes. But as use of e-cigarettes (''vaping'') becomes more popular, including as a way to cut back on cigarettes, little is known about its effect on cardiovascular health. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study, published in the journal Circulation, finds that vaping may not cut risk of cardiovascular disease in the way that most adults use them--in combination with cigarettes. (2021-01-06)

CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 5 Issue 2
The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the second issue of Volume 5. This issue brings together important research from authors in the USA and China, and includes new papers on 'Current Management Strategies in Patients with Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation' and 'Epicardial Adipose Tissue in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.' (2020-12-22)

Impaired blood vessel and kidney function underlie heart disease risk in people with HIV
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired blood vessel function, which increases risk of heart and blood vessel-disease. The increased heart disease risk is especially pronounced in people with HIV who also have kidney disease. The increased heart disease risk remains regardless of HIV severity or use of antiretroviral therapy. (2020-12-17)

Hearing loss and high blood sugar linked to poorer learning and memory among older Latinos
Researchers report that hearing loss and high blood sugar are associated with poor cognitive performance among middle-aged and older Latinos. (2020-12-17)

Aboriginal women share their stories on keeping the heart strong
More than a decade after committing $130+ billion to Closing the Gap, there has been little improvement in health outcomes experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. (2020-12-17)

Elite soccer players help define normal heart measures in competitive athletes
Analyses of professional soccer players' heart test results provide insights on athletes' cardiac structure and function. The hearts of elite soccer players frequently exhibit electrical and structural patterns that are above guideline-defined normal ranges. (2020-12-16)

Higher variability in glomerular filtration rate is associated with higher mortality
In this paper published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD), researchers evaluated associations between eGFR variability and subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality among SPRINT participants. They found that greater eGFR variability was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality independent of baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and other risk factors. (2020-12-14)

Study shows women less likely to survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than men
DALLAS - Dec. 15, 2020 - A study of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest shows that women have a lower likelihood of survival compared with men and are less likely to receive procedures commonly administered following cardiac arrest. (2020-12-14)

Patients with non-cardiac chest pain are reassured with brief education
Patients diagnosed with non-cardiac chest pain are reluctant to believe they do not have heart disease. A new study shows that explaining the test results convinces patients and reduces the likelihood of future chest pain. The research is presented at EACVI - Best of Imaging 2020, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Chest pain is one of the most frequent causes of consults at the emergency department. (2020-12-12)

Test your heart health by climbing stairs
Climbing four flights of stairs in less than a minute indicates good heart health, according to research presented at EACVI - Best of Imaging 2020, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'The stairs test is an easy way to check your heart health,' said study author Dr. Jesús Peteiro, a cardiologist at University Hospital A Coruña, Spain. (2020-12-11)

Fracking sites may increase heart failure hospitalizations across large regions
Heart failure patients who live in communities affected by fracking are at increased risk for hospitalization, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology today. The study looked at the environmental exposure risk of thousands of heart failure patients across Pennsylvania. (2020-12-07)

Amino acid connected to NAFLD could provide treatment clues
Basic science research explores the effects of impaired glycine metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - and how to potentially use glycine-based treatment to help people with NAFLD. (2020-12-03)

COVID-19 advice may have reduced exposure to heart attack triggers
A new study suggests that COVID-19 guidance in Sweden may have reduced people's risks of having a heart attack. By using anonymous location data from mobile phones, researchers developed an aggregate picture of the activities of the Swedish population and mapped it against attendances at the country's 29 emergency cardiac angiography units. (2020-12-03)

Patients receiving low dose steroid at increased risk of cardiovascular disease
Glucocorticoids are steroids widely prescribed to treat a range of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. While high doses of steroids are known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, the impact of lower doses is unknown. A study published in PLOS Medcine by Mar Pujades-Rodriguez at Leeds University and colleagues suggests that even low doses of glucocorticoid may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. (2020-12-03)

LGB adults may be less likely to take statins to prevent heart disease
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) adults are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease than non-LGB adults. Yet, LGB adults who have diabetes or high cholesterol are less likely than non-LGB adults to use statins, which help prevent cardiovascular events such as heart attacks. There is an urgent need for prevention programs aimed at reaching at-risk LGB adults to increase knowledge about the benefits of statins. (2020-12-02)

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